March 9, 1939

ARROW LAKES, B.C., WHARFINGER

CON

Mr. ESLING:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was W. J. Doherty appointed wharfinger at Renata, on the Arrow lakes, in British Columbia? If so, when did he assume his duties? 3

2. What remuneration has he received from the date of his appointment to January 31, 1939?

3. What amount is due him 15, 1939?

up to February

Topic:   ARROW LAKES, B.C., WHARFINGER
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

1. Yes. May 19, 1938.

2. He has collected thirty-nine cents and is entitled to 50 per cent as remuneration.

3. Nil.

subversive propaganda

Topic:   ARROW LAKES, B.C., WHARFINGER
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CCF

Mr. HEAPS:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Has the attention of the government been drawn to the activities of recently naturalized subjects actively engaged in subversive propaganda tending to create racial hatreds and animosities?

2. If it is proven, after investigation, that these persons are guilty of subversive activities, will the government revoke their naturalization certificates?

Topic:   ARROW LAKES, B.C., WHARFINGER
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LIB

Mr. LAPOINTE (Quebec East): (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. The matter is being investigated.

Topic:   ARROW LAKES, B.C., WHARFINGER
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FOOD DONATIONS TO ALBERTA DROUGHT AREAS

SC

Mr. JOHNSTON (Bow River):

Social Credit

1. Did the Alberta government make any requests to the dominion government for vegetables, fruit or fish for the drought areas during 1938?

2. If so, on what basis were the costs to be borne by: (a) the provincial government; and (b) the dominion government?

3. What costs were borne by the Saskatchewan government in respect to the dominion government's donations of apples, beans, cheese and fish for the drought areas during 1938?

Topic:   FOOD DONATIONS TO ALBERTA DROUGHT AREAS
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LIB

SUDETEN AND OTHER EUROPEAN IMMIGRANTS

LIB

Mr. GARIEPY:

Liberal

1. Is it true, as published in La Presse of the 4th instant, page 1, that arrangements have been completed for the transportation to Canada of a number of Sudeten people and for their settlement on farms in Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia?

2. Is the government aware of these arrangements, if such exist, or of any arrangements whatsoever for the transportation to, and settlement in Canada of Sudetens or other European immigrants ?

3. What is the nature, object and date of these arrangements, and who are the persons with whom the arrangements have been made?

4. When will such arrangements go into effect?

5. How many individuals will be admitted into Canada, and where will they be located by virtue of any agreement reached?

6. What is the extent of the financial responsibility, if any, assumed by the dominion government for carrying out this settlement plan?

7. Will the government submit the proposed plan of settlement for the consideration of parliament?

Sudeten Immigrants

Topic:   SUDETEN AND OTHER EUROPEAN IMMIGRANTS
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LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. CRERAR:

I propose to read on the orders of the day a statement that I think will answer the questions that have been asked in regard to this matter.

Topic:   SUDETEN AND OTHER EUROPEAN IMMIGRANTS
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COLONEL GEORGE MCLEOD

SC

Mr. KENNEDY:

Social Credit

1. Is Colonel George McLeod of Edmonton, Alberta, in the employ of the federal government?

2. If so, what position does he hold?

3. When was he appointed?

4. At what salary?

5. Is he allowed a per diem expense account, and, if so, how much?

6. What is the total amount he has received since his appointment: (a) in salary; (b) for expenses?

Topic:   COLONEL GEORGE MCLEOD
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LIB

Mr. DUNNING: (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Creditors' representative on the Alberta board of review under the Farmers' Creditors Arrangement Act, 1934.

3. December 31, 1936.

4. Fees. (S25 for every full day on which he is engaged in his duties pursuant to his appointment.)

5. Yes. A travelling allowance of $10 per diem and railway expenses while travelling.

6. (a) $13,350; (b) $4,182.40.

Topic:   COLONEL GEORGE MCLEOD
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SUDETEN IMMIGRANTS

SETTLEMENT IN CANADA OP FAMILIES FROM CZECHO-SLOVAKIA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Minister of Mines and Resources):

A few days ago questions were asked in regard to the matter of the proposed settlement in Canada of some Sudeten German refugees. I may say at once that there has been some misunderstanding as to the actual facts. A report, originating in London, appeared in the following Canadian press dispatch on March 3:

London, March 3.-Arrangements have been completed for the transportation of 3,000 Sudeten Germans to Canada, it was reported to-night. They will be settled in the Peace River district and in northern Saskatchewan.

The Czech government has agreed to provide the $2,000,000 which the settlers will take to Canada to establish themselves in farming communities. The money came from loans and gifts made by the British and French governments after the Munich settlement.

Canadian railway companies, it is reported, have completed arrangements to take the first group of settlers early in April.

It is understood an agreement has been reached between the Canadian and Czech governments calling for each family to take a minimum of $1,500. The new settlers will be Germans who refused to become citizens of the Reich after the Munich agreement transformed their homes from under the control of Czechoslovakia to that of Germany. They refused to be nazified and voluntarily gave up their homes.

Since the German occupation of the Sudeten areas the men and their women and children have been living under conditions of extreme hardship, with the Czech government providing refugee camps for them.

It is understood a majority of the new settlers are experienced farmers. They will be chosen carefully on behalf of the Canadian government but the total is not expected to exceed 3,000.

Topic:   SUDETEN IMMIGRANTS
Subtopic:   SETTLEMENT IN CANADA OP FAMILIES FROM CZECHO-SLOVAKIA
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CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Was that all a quotation?

Topic:   SUDETEN IMMIGRANTS
Subtopic:   SETTLEMENT IN CANADA OP FAMILIES FROM CZECHO-SLOVAKIA
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LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. CRERAR:

Yes, a Canadian press dispatch from London. A Prague dispatch of the fifth instant contained the following:

Prague, March 5.-Eight hundred families of former German socialists and democrats, cut adrift from their homes by Chancellor Hitler's annexation of the Sudetenland, have received permission from Ottawa to establish a village of their own in Canada, it was announced here Saturday.

The Czecho-Slovak and British governments have arranged for approximately 3,000 people to emigrate to the dominion. They will be led by two former members of the Czech Chamber of Deputies, Wenzel Jaksch and Siegfrid Taub.

Reports in London last Friday said the emigrants would be settled in the Peace River district and in northern Saskatchewan. The Prague government has allotted $1,500 to each family. This will come from the $75,000,000 which Britain recently granted Czecho-Slovakia, half as a loan and half as a gift, to aid refugees and assist in reconstruction work. . . ,

Following the partition of Czecho-Slovakia as a result of the Munich settlement, an acute refugee problem arose in Czecho-Slovakia due to the fact that tens of thousands of Czech citizens of German racial origin in the Sudeten area, who had been opposed to the nazi philosophy, fled from their homes in advance of the occupation by German troops. Shortly after this, urgent inquiries were made, from London and Prague, not only of the Canadian but of other governments as well, seeking some relief for these refugees, and Canada was asked if she would take some part in helping to solve the problem. Inquiries were set afoot by our immigration branch to discover the type and background of the refugees, and it was found that they had been engaged mainly in agriculture and small village industries. They were described as a sturdy type, but without capital, since in their flight they had abandoned everything. There were thus two classes-those who might come as agriculturists, a#d those who might come to establish new industries in this country.

When the immigration regulations were amended by order in council in the autumn of 1930, under the previous government, provision was made for the admission of farmers with sufficient means to establish themselves in agriculture in Canada. There has been a movement of such families from year to year, averaging during the past two

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Sudeten Immigrants

or three years about five hundred families a year. These have been settled on lands purchased with their own capital, usually farms that had come into the market at a fairly low price. All this settlement has been under the auspices of the colonization branches of our two railways. From reports that the department receives from time to time, it is apparent that the work is being well done. Many of these families have been established successfully with less than SI,500.

Early in December last a delegation from Czecho-Slovakia visited Canada to see if homes could be found for some of these refugees. The delegation consisted of an official of the Czech government and two others representing the German group from the Sudeten area. Their request was fully explored. They were told that, while we could not change the immigration regulations at present in force, no objection would be raised to their inclusion in the movement of agricultural families which has been going on for several years. It was pointed out that they would be required to meet rigid examination overseas as to their physical and mental health and their general fitness for settlement. They were further advised that each family unit-and it was estimated the average family unit was about four-would be required to have on arrival in Canada at least SI,500 of capital.

After this delegation returned to London we were advised that they had succeeded in getting capital whereby these families would be provided with the financial assistance necessary to meet the conditions laid down here, and referred to a moment ago.

Canada has not undertaken any obligation or expenditure in connection with this movement. All the costs of transportation and settlement will come from funds secured from abroad. The actual task of settlement will continue to be undertaken by the colonization branches of the railways. The statement that we have agreed to take 3,000 souls, as the London report suggests, or 800 families, as the Prague report suggests, is pure guess work. We have not agreed to take any specified number. The number to be taken will depend upon the number of those found to be physically and otherwise fit. The examination as to fitness will be hejd overseas, and colonization officials of the railways, together with medical doctors of the department of health, and immigration officials, will cooperate in an effort to see that those who come to Canada will be an asset to this dominion. The examinations will begin shortly. The total number of this group at present in Czecho-Slovakia itself is less than half the number mentioned in press dispatches.

It should be emphasized that such of these families as come to Canada for land settlement will be located under the auspices of the colonization branches of the railways. We have no information at the moment where they will be settled, but we understand that the railways intend putting them into small groups where suitable land is available, in order to make supervision for the first few years less expensive than if they were scattered over wider areas. The report from Prague that these people are coming for village settlement is entirely erroneous.

While the methods being followed for the admission of refugees to Canada may not be satisfactory to all, I believe we are going about the matter in the way best calculated to help some of these unfortunate people, without at the same time disturbing conditions here. Many members of the house know something of the pressure on the department to open the doors wider for the admission of greater numbers than are at present coming in. It is undeniably true that the plight of hundreds of thousands of the refugees in Europe is a desperate one and must appeal to the humanitarian instincts of all. The criticism has been made that, since Canada has vast areas either thinly settled or not settled at all, with a wealth of resources that many other countries envy, we should adopt a more generous attitude in the matter of immigration and give an opportunity to worthy people to make homes for themselves in our fortunate land. We must, however, having regard to existing conditions, recognize that there are limits within which we can assist; within those limits we are trying to deal with these problems with as much consideration as can be given.

Topic:   SUDETEN IMMIGRANTS
Subtopic:   SETTLEMENT IN CANADA OP FAMILIES FROM CZECHO-SLOVAKIA
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March 9, 1939