February 28, 1939

THE LATE J. W. RUTHERFORD


Right .Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, hon. members will have learned with deep regret of the death, last night, of the member for Kent, Ontario, Doctor James W. Rutherford. While death, when it occurs, seems to take us by surprise, in the case of Doctor Rutherford, the surprise is that having met with the very serious accident he did, in September, 1935, he continued to live as long as he did. Only a very brave and resolute spirit could have endured the physical suffering he endured for so long a time and have risen above it to the extent that on occasions he did. Death to the doctor meant release from suffering borne with the utmost patience and fortitude over three and a half years. The personnel of the House of Commons has so largely changed in recent years that I doubt if there are, in its membership at the present time, one-fifth of those who were members of parliament at the time Doctor Rutherford himself became a member in 1926. The accident with which the Doctor met occurred in the course of the electoral campaign of 1935. It deprived him of further personal participation in the elections, and deprived him also of the opportunity of taking his seat in the present parliament, save on one occasion when, during the last session, he made an appearance in a wheel chair for a day or two in this house. Many hon. members, therefore, will have had little or no acquaintance with Doctor Rutherford, and will be unable to appreciate, as those of us who knew him in the years he sat in the Commons between 1926 and 1935, how great is the loss suffered by the constituency he represented, by the public life of our country, and by his profession because of the injuries which brought prematurely to its close a career which had already been marked by many achievements, and gave promise of long continued personal and public service. Doctor Rutherford's life associations were with the western portion of the province of Ontario and more immediately with the county of Kent in which he was born in 1875, and with the city of Chatham at whose public schools and collegiate institute, he received his early education, and where the greater part of his life was spent. He was a graduate of the university of Toronto. He pursued postgraduate studies in medicine at University College, London, England. Doctor Rutherford soon came to be recognized as a leading physician and surgeon in western Ontario, and at the time of his membership in this house was looked upon as one of the leading surgeons in our country. In the choice of his profession, Doctor Rutherford followed and was, no doubt, inspired by the example of his ' father who, for half a century, had practised medicine in Chatham.



The Late J. W. Rutherford



Doctor Rutherford's popularity in the county of Kent was evidenced by his selection as one of the candidates in the general election of 1925, by his election to parliament in 1926, and his re-election at the general elections of 1930 and 1935. Recalling the part which he took in the proceedings of this house in the two preceding parliaments, and the position he had come to occupy in his profession, I can only express the regret which I know will be shared by all, that one whose life was so wholly devoted to the well-being of others, so eminently useful and skilful, should have been brought to its close in circumstances so tragic. Doctor Rutherford's loss will be particularly felt by the Liberal party of which, in the province of Ontario, he was recognized as a foremost member. In his passing the government suffers the loss of one of its ablest supporters, and many of us, the loss of one who was the most loyal and devoted of friends. The sympathy of hon. members will go out, in full measure, to Mrs. Rutherford and to her son and daughter who, during the past three and a half years, have suffered so much in the way of anxiety and have now lost to sight the one who throughout their lives had been the centre of their affections. We may look, I know, to His Honour the Speaker to convey to Mrs. Rutherford and the others who have been so greatly bereaved, the expression of our deepest sympathy.


CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Leader of the Opposition) :

Mr. Speaker, may I join with the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) in expressing to the family of the late Doctor Rutherford, the sympathy of our party. Whenever on these painful occasions one rises to pay tribute to some member who has gone, unconsciously a thought as to the high mortality rate of the House of Commons comes to one's mind. Only a few weeks ago we were speaking about the deaths of David Beaubier and Samuel Jacobs, one from each side of the house, and Doctor Rutherford is the third member whose loss we mourn in this early part of the session.

Naturally, I did not have the opportunity of knowing Doctor Rutherford as intimately as my right hon. friend and the party opposite, but the little I did know of him was to his credit. Like the late David Beaubier, of whom I spoke a few weeks ago, he did not take part in debate in the house as frequently as some of the rest of us. But I have often wondered if perhaps those of us who speak so frequently render as much service as those who speak less. Doctor Rutherford certainly bore a good reputation as a member of the

various committees upon which he served, and as one who looked after the interests of his constituents and carried out whatever other duties devolved upon him as a member of the House of Commons.

If I may be permitted to say so, many times in the house I have been struck with the fact that men who originally have been trained as medical practitioners have given valuable service in the House of Commons.

I have come to the conclusion that a medical training affords a splendid mental development for the work of the house. Doctor Rutherford was certainly no exception in that respect; he always gave the service expected of him.

I should like to join sincerely indeed with my right hon. friend and the party to which he belongs in expressing sympathy to that party upon its loss of another outstanding member, and I would join with him and other hon. members of the house in passing on, through you, Mr. Speaker, to the family of Doctor Rutherford, our deep sympathy.

Topic:   THE LATE J. W. RUTHERFORD
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CCF

James Shaver Woodsworth

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members in the group to which I belong would like to join with the others in expressing through you our sympathy to Mrs. Rutherford and the family in the loss which they have sustained.

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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, inasmuch as hon. members in this group had no opportunity of knowing Doctor Rutherford, except by report and from the one day during which he so bravely sat in the house and showed he was able to endure suffering with calmness and fortitude, it seems to me it is fitting that we should associate ourselves with the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) in his eloquent and fitting tribute. We desire, sir, that you remember us when you extend to the bereaved family the consolations of the house.

Mr. JEAN-FRANCOIS POULIOT (Temiscouata): Mr. Speaker, Doctor James Warren Rutherford was one of the most adroit and the most skilful surgeons not only of the province of Ontario but of the whole of Canada. He had a large practice, and his career as a practitioner was very brilliant. He performed so many operations which were considered as miracles in modern surgery that his name was respected and honoured by the heads of the medical profession on the whole north American continent.

It was at first a great sacrifice for him to enter into politics. Until then he had given all his time to his numerous patients, who were so dear to him. But he was a man of deep convictions. He was a true Canadian of Scotch ancestry, and a Liberal at heart.

Civil Service-Superannuation Act

He was a strong believer in the necessity of promoting Liberal ideals and Liberal policies for the welfare of his fellow countrymen. From 1926 to 1935 he divided his time between attending to his large practice and attending to the sittings of the House of Commons. His colleagues who had the privilege of knowing him intimately during that period will always cherish the most pleasant memory of his kindness, of his discreet humour, of his wisdom, and of his everlasting friendship.

While campaigning in the last general election he was the victim of an unfortunate accident. He was in the hospital, for the first time as a patient, when he learned that he had again been elected by a large majority. Then the suggestion was made to him to resign his seat in favour of some one else. He refused, saying that death only could break the happy association with parliament, which he prized so much. Last year he came to the house on a wheel chair, to attend a debate in which he was particularly interested.

If I may be permitted to add a few personal recollections, I would say that it was he who invited me to speak, for the first time outside of Ottawa, in Ontario. The occasion was in April, 1932, at the annual meeting of the Ontario Women's Liberal Association, which was held in his city, the beautiful maple city of Chatham. Mr. Hepburn spoke on that occasion. On the following day, in company with another dear friend of ours, Mr. Melville Rossie, editor of the London Advertiser, we went to speak at Lucan, where our friend from Middlesex East, Colonel Ross, also spoke. At that time Mr. Hepburn was apparently in very good health. I attended another meeting at Chatham on June 14, 1934, which was held in the armouries. On that occasion the hall was packed to capacity, and the two most prominent people in attendance were Mr. Hepburn and Doctor Rutherford who, in the meantime, had saved Mr. Hepburn's life. Mr. Hepburn will tell anyone that the fact he is still alive is due to the skilful operation performed by Doctor Rutherford.

I should like therefore to join with others who have spoken and to express my deep grief at the death of such a dear friend, one who was a great medical man, a great Liberal and a great Scotsman.

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THE SECRETARY OF STATE

BIRTHDAY GREETINGS TO THE HON. MR. RINFRET


On the order for motions:


LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. FERNAND RINFRET (Secretary of State):

I desire to thank the house for its

cordial expression of goodwill, as shown by 71492-88|

the applause with which I have just been greeted, on the occasion of my birthday anniversary. When one advances in years he realizes that he needs a little sympathy on occasions of this kind, and again I thank my fellow members of the house for what has been forthcoming to-day.

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Subtopic:   BIRTHDAY GREETINGS TO THE HON. MR. RINFRET
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CIVIL SERVICE

SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO TERMS AND OPERATION OF SUPERANNUATION ACT FIRST REPORT


Mr. MALCOLM McLEAN (Melfort) presented the first report of the special committee appointed to inquire into the operation of the Civil Service Superannuation Act, as follows: The special committee appointed to inquire into the operation of the Civil Service Superannuation Act begs leave to present the following as a first report: Your committee recommends that it be granted leave to print from day to day 500 copies in English and 200 copies in French of its minutes of proceedings and evidence and that standing order 64 be suspended in relation thereto. Mr. McLEAN (Melfort) moved that the report be concurred in.


CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Kootenay East):

Of course this motion should have notice. There are distinct rules of the house regarding printing, and I believe the time has come when we should scrutinize with great care the granting of permission to have stenographic reports made of committee proceedings. I think this is going beyond all reason. Years ago it used to be limited to specially interesting subjects, but to have a special Hansard for practically every committee, as is done now, I think is going too far. My opinion is that such requests as this should be referred to the committee on printing as to the advisability and, above all, the necessities of the case. I know nothing about the circumstances which have brought forth this motion, and I am objecting to it not for any particular reason, but rather on general principles.

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): I have considerable sympathy

with the view expressed by the hon. member for Kootenay East (Mr. Stevens), it will be remembered that I raised the question in almost similar terms a year ago. There is not only the expense involved in providing complete Hansard reports of all committees, and the cost of printing; but the fact is that our available staff facilities were not sufficient to meet the demands which were made last session and are not sufficient to meet those which probably will be made this session. It is very difficult to discriminate as between

1386 COMMONS

Canada-United-States-Cattle Quotas

committees. Last year we found that each committee insisted upon its proceedings being made a matter of record.

With regard to this committee, I am advised that the work done last session, which is a matter of record, very nearly completes what will be required by way of evidence. The nature of the matters being dealt with in this case I think justifies a record being made, because specific statements and calculations made by witnesses require to be a matter of Hansard record, particularly when they are not included in any submitted written document. I do not think there will be great difficulty with regard to this committee.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO TERMS AND OPERATION OF SUPERANNUATION ACT FIRST REPORT
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

My remarks apply to all committees.

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Subtopic:   SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO TERMS AND OPERATION OF SUPERANNUATION ACT FIRST REPORT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

So far as the taking of evidence in this committee is concerned, the work is practically completed. If the committee is of the same mind as it was last year, I take it that from now on it will be a matter of the committee discussing what ought to be done in the light of the evidence. That will certainly not necessitate a Hansard record

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Subtopic:   SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO TERMS AND OPERATION OF SUPERANNUATION ACT FIRST REPORT
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LIB

Malcolm McLean

Liberal

Mr. McLEAN (Melfort):

It is not anticipated that much printing will be required, outside of possibly the final report and one or two sessions of the committee. However, in order to have that little done, authority must be requested.

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Subtopic:   SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO TERMS AND OPERATION OF SUPERANNUATION ACT FIRST REPORT
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Motion agreed to.


IMMIGRATION

February 28, 1939