January 27, 1939

STANDING ORDERS


Messieurs: Baker MeCuaig Barry Plaxton Bercovitch Poole Bertrand (Prescott) Pottier Brunelle Rowe Denis (Dufferin-Simcoe) Fleming Rutherford Heaps Thauvette Leclerc Thompson MacLean (Cape Breton Turgeon North-Victoria) Turner-20. (Quorum 8)


MARINE AND FISHERIES


Messieurs: Black (Mrs.) Brasset Brooks Brunelle Clark (Essex South) Cote Deslauriers Farquhar Ferron Gauthier Green Hanson Kinley Lapointe (Matapedia-Matane) MacLean (Prince) MacLean (Cape Breton North-Victoria) MaeNeil McAvity McCulloch McDonald (Souris) Michaud Neill Pelletier Pottier Reid Rickard Robichaud Stirling Taylor (Nanaimo) Telford Tomlinson Tustin Veniot Ward White-35. (Quorum 10) Standing Committees


MINES, FORESTS AND WATERS


Messieurs: Black (Mrs.) Blais Bradette Brooks Clarke (Rosedale) Cochrane Crerar Crete Esiing Earquhar Ferguson Hamilton Hanson Hartigan Hay hurst Hill Hurtubise Hyndman Johnston (Bow River) Lacroix (Beauce) Little MacKenzie (Neepawa) MacLennan MacMillan MacNicol MeCallum McDonald (Pontiac) O'Neill Parent (Quebec West and South) Patterson Roberge Stevens Sylvestre Taylor (Nanaimo) Tremblay-35. (Quorum 10)


INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS


Barry Black (Mrs.) Blackmore Church Crete Deslauriers Dubuc Gladstone Grant Hartigan Homuth Howard Howden Isnor Jean Lacroix (Quebec-Montmorency) Ledue Messieurs: Lennard Maclnnis MacKenzie (Neepawa) MacNicol McAvity McGeer McIntosh Mclvor McLean (SimcoeEast) Martin Massey Mayhew Neill Rogers Rowe (Athabaska) St-Pere Taylor (Nanaimo) Tucker-35. (Quorum 10)



Messieurs: Cote Esiing Finn Gauthier Hill Lawson MacKinnon (Edmonton West) McIntosh McNevin (Victoria, Out.) Mitchell Pinard Pouliot-12. (Quorum 7) PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT (Members to act on the part of the Commons) Messieurs: Barry Bertrand (Laurier) Casselman Chevrier Damude Davidson Denis Douglas (Weyburn) Dussault Elliott (Kindersley) Esiing Evans Ferron Fleming, Fournier (Maison-neuve-Rosemount) Gauthier Green Hansell Hurtubise Hushion Jean Kirk Lapointe (Matapedia-Matane) Ledue Lennard Little Maclnnis MacKinnon (Edmonton West) MacLean (Prince) McGregor McIntosh McKenzie (Lambton-Kent) McNevin (Victoria, Ont.) Marsh Marshall Mills Moore Mullins Mulock Mutch Pinard Purdy Reid Ross (St. Paul's) Ross (Middlesex East) Rutherford St-Pfere Taylor (Nanaimo) Thompson Tucker Tustin Veniot Weir Winkler-54. LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT (Members to act on the Mr. Speaker Ahearn Blackmore Blair Blanchette Bonnier Bothwell Bouchard Bradette Brasset Cameron (Hastings South) Casselman Clark (York-Sunbury) Duffus Emmerson Fournier (Maison-neuve-Rosemount) Grant Green Hamilton Hyndman Johnston (Lake Centre) Kuhl Lennard part of the Commons) and Messieurs: Maclnnis MacKinnon (Edmonton West) MacLean (Cape Breton North-Victoria) MacLennan MacXeil Maephail (Miss) MeCallum Mallette Martin Moore Mutch Parent (Quebec West and South) Parent (Terrebonne) Raymond Reid Rennie Ross (St. Paul's) St-Pere Spence Walsh Winkler Young-44. Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver) moved that the report be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


POWERS OF COMMITTEES

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That the standing committees of this house shall severally be empowered to examine and inquire into all such matters and things as may be referred to them by the house and to report from time to time their observations and opinions thereon, with power to send for persons, papers and records.

Topic:   POWERS OF COMMITTEES
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Motion agreed to.


EUROPEAN SITUATION

QUESTION OF PUBLISHING OF CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO CRISIS OF SEPTEMBER 1938- TABLING OF WHITE PAPER


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

The hon. leader of the

European Situation-Correspondence

opposition (Mr. Manion) inquired some days ago as to the possibility of publishing correspondence between the British and Canadian governments dealing with the international situation of last September. The hon. member stated that he excluded confidential information. In reply I stated that I should be glad to communicate with the British government to ascertain to what extent if at all they considered the correspondence should be made public. I added that it would be realized that the correspondence in question contained references to other countries, and it was not the practice to produce correspondence of this nature.

I at once communicated to the British government the substance of the question and answer. I now have a reply, which indicates that in the view of the government of the United Kingdom the telegrams in question, so far as they have not been published, belong to a class of correspondence which it has generally been agreed could not be published without detriment to the system of full exchange of information between his majesty's governments on foreign affairs. I can only say that on review of the documents in question I concur in this view.

It will be recalled that an extensive compilation of documents on the Czechoslovak crisis was issued by the government of the United Kingdom as a white paper, and presented to the parliament at Westminster on September 28. The same collection was printed and made public on the same day in Canada. The government thought that hon. members would wish to have this information at once, so the document containing the correspondence as compiled and printed was mailed to all members of parliament. Additional copies are available if desired. They can be had from the Department of External Affairs.

I now table the white paper as issued in Canada.

It may be of interest to the house to know that there was a comment in a leading Paris newspaper, Le Temps, regarding the French version of the 'white paper in question, to the effect that it was interesting that the most complete version in French of the official documents bearing on the crisis had been issued at Ottawa rather than at Paris.

Topic:   EUROPEAN SITUATION
Subtopic:   QUESTION OF PUBLISHING OF CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO CRISIS OF SEPTEMBER 1938- TABLING OF WHITE PAPER
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TRADE AGREEMENTS

UNITED KINGDOM-UNITED STATES-CANADA-STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I might also answer another question of the hon. leader of the

[Mr. Mackenzie King.l

opposition (Mr. Manion) in respect to the preliminary correspondence relating to the trade agreements. An examination of the files of official correspondence with the government of the United Kingdom concerning the trade negotiations with the United States has confirmed my impression that we could not reasonably request the government of the United Kingdom to agree to the publication of that correspondence which, in accordance with established usage, has been treated as confidential.

By way of explanation I might add, in the first place, that the original United Kingdom approach to the government of Canada in the matter was paralleled by similar and simultaneous inquiries of other empire governments as to whether they would severally agree to facilitate the successful conclusion of the contemplated trade negotiations between the United Kingdom and the United States by concurring in the requisite modifications of certain margins of preference guaranteed in their agreements with the United Kingdom. Publication of such preliminary correspondence would therefore require the consent, not only of the government of the United Kingdom but of all the other empire governments concerned.

Secondly it may be observed that the understanding finally reached between Canada and the United Kingdom regarding the extent to which they were each prepared to agree to modifications in the margins of preference which they respectively enjoyed in the markets of the other country was effected by the exchange of letters between the High Commissioner for the United Kingdom and myself, which have been tabled as an annexed document to the Canada-United States trade agreement. This understanding was arrived at in the course of the prolonged and complicated negotiations which Canada and the United Kingdom were simultaneously conducting with the United States. It represents the outcome of a confidential correspondence between governments, supplemented by discussions from time to time during the year that led up to the signing of the trade agreements.

In the light of these explanations it will, I trust, be understood why the government does not feel itself in a position to table any of the preliminary correspondence requested.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED KINGDOM-UNITED STATES-CANADA-STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE
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January 27, 1939