January 24, 1939

CRIMINAL CODE

AMENDMENT TO PERMIT SWEEPSTAKES ORGANIZED BY PROVINCES FOR BENEFIT OF UNIVERSITIES OR HOSPITALS


Mr. VITAL MALLETTE (Jacques-Cartier) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 10, to amend the criminal code.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PERMIT SWEEPSTAKES ORGANIZED BY PROVINCES FOR BENEFIT OF UNIVERSITIES OR HOSPITALS
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LIB

Joseph Léon Vital Mallette

Liberal

Mr. MALLETTE:

Subsection 6 of section 236 of the criminal code has to do with the exceptions in favour of lotteries. One of these exceptions is found in paragraph (e), as follows:

(e) the Art Union of London, Great Britain, or the Art Union of Ireland.

This exception is now obsolete. However, all hon. members know that quite a few sweepstakes are now being held throughout Canada. It is the intention of the bill to repeal paragraph (e) and replace it by another which would permit the recognition of sweepstakes by the governments of the provinces, the benefits to go to universities and hospitals.

The bill, Mr. Speaker, speaks for itself.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

258 COMMONS

Questions Permissible on Orders of the Day

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PERMIT SWEEPSTAKES ORGANIZED BY PROVINCES FOR BENEFIT OF UNIVERSITIES OR HOSPITALS
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UNEMPLOYMENT

RELIEF HOSPITALIZATION-ARREST OF SINGLE UNEMPLOYED MEN IN TORONTO CASES ON REMAND AT TIMMINS AND WHITBY


On the orders of the day:


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers), notice of which was given last week-end but a reply to which was not included in his remarks yesterday.

First, will the minister consider the giving of assistance for relief hospitalization? Second, will the minister consider the cases of thousands of senior citizens, industrial workers and others out of work, who are not on relief but are suffering? Third, the minister stated that the prosecutions in Toronto are under the city's by-laws. I would point out that they are being taken under the criminal code as well as under the city's by-laws. The minister stated that these men are in gaol. They got out of gaol last Friday.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   RELIEF HOSPITALIZATION-ARREST OF SINGLE UNEMPLOYED MEN IN TORONTO CASES ON REMAND AT TIMMINS AND WHITBY
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. The hon. member has the right to put questions of public interest on the orders of the day, but he has not the right to make a speech.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   RELIEF HOSPITALIZATION-ARREST OF SINGLE UNEMPLOYED MEN IN TORONTO CASES ON REMAND AT TIMMINS AND WHITBY
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

I have a question to ask, Mr. Speaker, but first I wish to call to the attention of the minister, without comment, the cases of those on remand at Timmins, Whitby and Toronto gaols, and to ask what action will be taken. Will the minister give consideration to these complaints, and will he pass some reference over to the provincial authorities when they come up for trial?

Hon. NORMAN McL. ROGERS (Minister of Labour): Mr. Speaker, the several matters to which my hon. friend has referred are of such a kind as are constantly receiving the attention of the Department of Labour. As I informed the house yesterday with respect to the position of transients in Toronto who are under remand, the matter is now the subject of communication between the Department of Labour and the Department of Public Welfare in the city of Toronto.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   RELIEF HOSPITALIZATION-ARREST OF SINGLE UNEMPLOYED MEN IN TORONTO CASES ON REMAND AT TIMMINS AND WHITBY
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, perhaps hon. members would allow me, not with a view

to curtailing discussion in any way, but rather to enable the house to get on with its business, to draw attention to the rules with respect to asking questions on the orders of the day.

The rules do provide for an opportunity to ask questions on the orders of the day with reference to an emergent situation on which it is desirable to have immediate information from the ministry. But if hon. members will look at standing order 17, and citation 197, they will see that the rule is that:

A question which could be inserted on the order paper is not allowed on the orders of the day being called.

Yesterday we had a regular battery of questions on the orders of the day. I think most of them might have been placed on the order paper. Probably they would not have been allowed except that his honour the Speaker did not wish to prevent anyone from having as much latitude as possible. The rule which I have quoted is there for the convenience of all members of the house, and no doubt his honour the Speaker will wish to see that it is enforced as we proceed.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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CON

Robert James Manion (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Leader of the Opposition):

Just one word in connection with what my right hon. friend has said. I quite agree that the rule is there. At the same time I think that both he and I have been impressed with the fact that in the British House of Commons the question hour is literally an hour or more; and I am wondering if it would not be to the advantage of all of us, of the house, and of the country, if in this, as in so many other things, we were to follow the British custom and permit a little more latitude in regard to questions, so that the country would have a reasonably prompt reply in regard to many matters. I am not saying this with any thought of embarrassing the government or of criticizing the remarks of the right hon. gentleman. It is merely that I believe that for the sake of good government it would be a good thing, whatever party is in power, to permit a considerable amount of latitude in regard to such matters as this.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

First, in regard to what my hon. friend had to say as to the custom in the British house in answering questions on the orders of the day, the British house, like this house, is governed by its standing rules, and the rules of the British house are somewhat different from the rules here. If the rules of this house are to be changed they ought to be considered in the first instance by the appropriate committee of the house and approved by the house. So long as the

Radio-Address oj Prime Minister

rules are what they are, I think my hon. friend will agree with me that they ought to be observed.

I have not in mind at the moment the practice of the British house, but my recollection is that except questions which are of an urgent character the only kind of question which is permitted to be asked which does not appear on the orders of the day is a supplementary question arising out of a question that is already on the orders of the day; a minister may be asked-and I think it has been permitted here-if the reply is not regarded as adequate, to supplement his remarks so as to make them quite clear.

My colleague the right hon. the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe) has drawn my attention to the wording of the rules of the British house with respect to questions. I quote the following:

No questions shall be taken after a quarter before four of the clock, except questions which have not been answered in consequence of the absence of the minister to whom they are addressed, and questions which have not appeared on the paper, but which are of an urgent character, and relate either to matters of public importance or to the arrangement of business.

The questions that are taken before that are the questions which are on the order paper.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

I rise to a question of privilege. In regard to the remarks of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), we might as well settle what rule 191 says as to what may be asked on the orders of the day. This matter was raised in the British house the other day, and my question is this: Has there been

any interpretation by you, Mr. Speaker, regarding questions on the orders of the day? I would ask that you give a ruling, because the question I raised relates to the liberty of the subject and to Magna Carta. I am surprised that the Prime Minister has raised the point which he has, straining that point, and as he read Carlyle for three years to the unemployed, and now he reads Beauchesne. Regarding the rule itself, it has been interpreted just recently in the British house owing to the labour party members rising every day and calling the attention of the prime minister and others to foreign affairs and defence and the labour and relief situation. In this parliament we, fortunately, have not found ourselves in the position of Toronto, but when I find the gaols there and in Ontario filled with many people who had come from all over Canada because they could not get work, I think it is a matter of urgent public importance-

71492-17i

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

-and seven youths in gaol at Timmins-I think it right to raise these questions on the orders of the day, under this rule.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   RULE RESPECTING QUESTIONS PERMISSIBLE ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
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January 24, 1939