June 30, 1938

INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION

REPORT ON DEMARCATION OF BOUNDARY FROM GULF OF GEORGIA TO LAKE OF THE WOODS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to

table a copy of the joint report of the International Boundary Commission upon the survey and demarcation of the boundary be-

tween Canada and the United States from the gulf of Georgia to the northwesternmost point of lake of the Woods, together with the atlas containing 59 joint maps to accompany the report.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION
Subtopic:   REPORT ON DEMARCATION OF BOUNDARY FROM GULF OF GEORGIA TO LAKE OF THE WOODS
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PETITION

CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present to the house a petition protesting against the "padlock law," signed by some fifty thousand people, together with resolutions from someone hundred and eighty different organizations.

Topic:   PETITION
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


GATINEAU POINT, QUE., RETAINING WALL

SC

Mr. PELLETIER:

Social Credit

1. Has the government made any contribution towards the cost of building a retaining wall or dock at or near Gatineau Point, Quebec?

2. Why was the project undertaken, and under the authority of what statute?

3. How much has been spent yearly since 1935 on this project?

4. Was the work given out by contract?

5. Were tenders called? If so, how many tenders were received, and what was the amount of each tender?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GATINEAU POINT, QUE., RETAINING WALL
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LIB

Mr. CARDIN: (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

1. No contribution made, but the federal government constructed the following works: (a) A protection wall on the bank of the Ottawa river at Gatineau Point village, (b) A protection work on the Gatineau river above Gatineau Point village.

2. To protect the bank along the highway from erosion, (a) Under item No. 75 Public Works Construction Act 1934, and continued under item No. 9 Supplementary Public Works Construction Act 1935; (b) under item No. 75 Public Works Construction Act 1934.

3. 1934-35 (a) construction, $10,742; (b)

construction, $4,987. 1935-36 (a) construction, $13,873.26. 1936-37 (a) repairs, $162.97; (b) repairs, $599.75.

4. Yes.

5. Local tenders invited and the following received: (a) Rodolphe Moreau, $12,257.50 revised to $10,437; Rene Beaudry, $12,702.75; Ed, Brunet, $13,117.50; Boucher Freres, $13,284.50; Antonio Patry, $13,315. (b) Rodolphe Moreau, $4,990.75; Hector Fortin, $5,895; Rene Lavigueur, $6,028.

Canadian War Memorials

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GATINEAU POINT, QUE., RETAINING WALL
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CANADIAN WAR MEMORIALS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, after the

great war, parliament felt it desirable and fitting that the service and sacrifice of Canada's forces in the war should be commemorated by the erection of appropriate memorials on the fields of battle. With this end in view, the government established, by an order in council of September 2, 1920, the Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission, consisting of the following members:

Major-General the Hon. S. C. Mewburn.

Hon. Rodolphe Lemieux.

Lt. General Sir R. E. W. Turner.

Lt. Col. R. W. Leonard.

Hon. J. G. Turriff

General Mewburn was designated chairman of the commission, and Colonel H. C. Osborne was appointed secretary. To this body, the task was entrusted of clearing war-torn ground, of planting trees and beds of flowers, of selecting the designs for the different memorials, and, generally, of supervising their construction. For more than a decade and a half the commission has carried on its labours with public-spirited enterprise. Under its auspices eight memorials, comprising the entire group as contemplated at the outset, have been brought to completion. Of these, three are located in Belgium-Passchendaele, St. Julien and "Hill 62," or, as it became known, "Sanctuary Wood." The other five are located in France, at Dury, Bourlon Wood, Courcelette, Le Quesnel, and at Vimy Ridge. In addition, plaques have been placed in the City Hall at Mons and St. Nazaire.

Only three members of the commission, General Mewburn, Hon. Senator Lemieux, and General Richard Turner, together with Colonel Osborne, the secretary, lived to see the completion of all the memorials. Since that time Senator Lemieux has also passed away.

To those who have been privileged to view the memorials, no word of explanation will be required with respect to the resolution now before the house. The members of the commission, serving entirely without remuneration, gave unstintingly of their time and energies to a task which called for the most careful and patient effort. It will be agreed, I believe, that their endeavours merit the recognition of parliament.

Of exceptional significance is the great memorial on Vimy Ridge, of which Mr. Walter S. Allward, of Toronto, is the designer and architect.

Hon. members who were in the house in 1923 will recall a resolution which was passed during the session of that year-a resolution which I had the honour of introducing- expressing the gratitude of the Canadian parliament to the French republic for the gift of 250 acres of land on Vimy Ridge. This gracious act on the part of France ensured that the monument, which Canada proposed to erect on that historic site, might stand on Canadian soil.

The efforts of the Canadian Legion, over a period of two years, in organizing the visit of eight thousand pilgrims to Vimy Ridge for the unveiling of the memorial on July 26, 1936, and the ceremonies incidental thereto, will still be present to the minds of hon. members, and will long be remembered by the Canadian people.

The Vimy memorial fulfils a twofold purpose. It commemorates the valour of our countrymen throughout the long years of the war, and the sacrifice of those who gave their lives in the conflict. It constitutes, in particular, a memorial of the heroic endeavours of the Canadian troops, and of their British and French brothers-in-arms, who fought upon the ridge at Vimy. On the monument are inscribed the names of Canadian soldiers who lie in unknown graves in France. *

The monument at Vimy has been described as. perhaps, the most beautiful and striking of the memorials of the great war. Mr. Allward has given unsparingly of his artistic genius to interpret and commemorate the spirit and ideals of those who bore arms for Canada in the war. In the memorial he has achieved for the dominion, as for himself, a place of high distinction in the realm of sculpture. Not only has he given to the world a great work of art; he has caught, in an impressive manner, and preserved for our own and succeeding generations, the true significance of Canada's participation in the war. It is most appropriate, therefore, that an expression should be given by the parliament of Canada of its appreciation of Mr. Allward's services, an appreciation which will be shared by the people of Canada generally.

Accordingly, I desire to move, seconded by the right hon. the leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett):

That this house desires to record its thanks to the members of the Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission, who served without remuneration over a period of years, and whose endeavours ensured the erection in France and Belgium of appropriate memorials of the valour and sacrifice of Canada's forces in the great war;

And, that this house desires particularly to express its appreciation of the services of Mr. Walter S. Allward, who, as the designer and

Canadian War Memorials

architect of the memorial at Yimy, has given to the world, a work of art of outstanding beauty and character. Through the years to come the Vimy memorial will remain the symbol of Canada's efforts in the war, and its tribute to those who, on the field of battle, sought to preserve the free institutions of mankind.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN WAR MEMORIALS
Sub-subtopic:   APPRECIATION OF SERVICES OF CANADIAN BATTLEFIELDS MEMORIALS COMMISSION AND DESIGNER OF VIMY MEMORIAL
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

I regard it, Mr. Speaker, as a great privilege to associate myself with the right hon the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) in the motion that you have just read. I do not propose to do more than state my entire agreement with the sentiments that have been so eloquently expressed by the Prime Minister, because at this time it would be out of place to make any extended observations.

The truth is that honouring the memory of the dead is a matter of very great importance. One of our own great Canadian statesmen, Joseph Howe, in stanzas which I think will live as long as his memory is preserved, has indicated why we should remember the glorious dead. To do so fittingly when our beloved dead rest in far distant lands was an extremely difficult task. When the Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission was set up they cooperated closely with the British commission headed by General Sir Fabian Ware; and anyone who has visited the battlefields will agree, I think, that the work done has been magnificently conceived and certainly executed in a manner worthy of the highest praise.

Rich and poor, high and low, whatever may have been their place in civil life, find exactly the same memorial in these great cemeteries in France and Flanders. It is fitting that it should be so, because these crosses not only commemorate the valour of our immortal dead but tell the tale of sacrifice forever associated with the cross. I cannot do more than express deep regret that there remain but two, if my memory serves me rightly, of the original members of that commission which was appointed only a few years ago. It is a singular commentary on the brevity of human life.

The conception of this great memorial at Vimy Ridge was that of Mr. Allward of Toronto. The competition, I believe, was open to the world. The problem was how to interpret in stone the genius of a people and to commemorate at once the valour of brave men who gave their lives as a sacrifice for their country. I think it can be said of this memorial that it does interpret the genius of the Canadian people, and every Canadian who looks upon it will be filled with justifiable pride. Let us hope that in future years Canadians of those days will look upon that ridge and read the names of the men who

perished and were buried in nameless graves, but marked for all time on the base of that great monument.

War is a hateful thing, and yet I sometimes feel that however hateful we may think it the fact remains that it has developed those great qualities in men of which we are so proud and of which we speak so often in praise and in recognition of their bravery, their courage, and their sacrifice. All these high qualities are exemplified in war, and the horrors of war. I repeat, I sometimes wonder why it is that in no field of history do we find such evidence of the great qualities of mankind as we find in the tales of their heroism, devotion and sacrifice in time of war, whether it be the Spartans at Thermopylae, or those who died on Vimy Ridge. Yet in our great memorial we have a magnificent work of art, some compensation for the disfiguring results of war.

So I regard it as a privilege to join with the Prime Minister in commending the efforts of the Canadian Battlefields Memorials Commission and in congratulating them upon the splendid service they have rendered to this country, and upon the fitting character and beauty of the memorials they have builded in various parts of France and Flanders, and that future generations may know that this Canadian parliament had a proper realization also of the splendid work done by Mr. Allward, sculptor and artist, in so fittingly interpreting the loyalty, courage and devotion of those who died on Vimy Ridge that we might live.

Mr. J. II. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge): There are before the minds of men to-day several things of priceless value. Perhaps the first of these is democracy. Following that are peace, prosperity and virtue. In order to achieve in the highest degree, and to preserve for the generations yet to come, these precious things, there are in my opinion two great necessities. The first of these is the unity and greatness of the British Empire. The second is the unity and greatness of Canada as part of that empire. The men whose memory we to-day are holding in reverence gave freely for democracy, peace, prosperity and virtue, for the unity and greatness of the British Empire, and for the unity and greatness of Canada. It has been truthfully said, "They served till death. Why not we "?

I have always been thrilled by the words which I understand have been placed on a great memorial to them. With those words I should like to close:

Their name liveth for evermore.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN WAR MEMORIALS
Sub-subtopic:   APPRECIATION OF SERVICES OF CANADIAN BATTLEFIELDS MEMORIALS COMMISSION AND DESIGNER OF VIMY MEMORIAL
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Motion agreed to. Radio Broadcasting


COMMONS CHAMBER


On the orders of the day:


CON

Norman James Macdonald Lockhart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. N. J. M. LOCKHART (Lincoln):

I should like to direct an inquiry to the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Cardin). Possibly it has already been drawn to his attention, but I refer to the very unsatisfactory condition of the lighting across the back row of this chamber. Will he look into the matter and have it remedied before the next session of parliament?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COMMONS CHAMBER
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO UNSATISFACTORY LIGHTING CONDITIONS
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LIB

Pierre-Joseph-Arthur Cardin (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. A. CARDIN (Minister of Public Works) :

The question was brought to my

attention a few days ago by His Honour the .Speaker, and I have asked the officers of my department to look into the matter and try to improve the lighting on that side of the house. I am under the impression that it has been better on this side since improvement has been made. The reason for preference was that the conditions on this side of the house were brought to my attention first.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COMMONS CHAMBER
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO UNSATISFACTORY LIGHTING CONDITIONS
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CON

Norman James Macdonald Lockhart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LOCKHART:

Possibly there is more *need of light on that side!

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COMMONS CHAMBER
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO UNSATISFACTORY LIGHTING CONDITIONS
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FARMERS' CREDITORS

June 30, 1938