May 23, 1938

LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

I had no foreknowledge of that.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

The lay-offs were staggered through March and April.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

-and then advised to go to their homes, with such assistance as might have been given them. But no attempt was made to handle the situation along these lines.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
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LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

The departure from the

camps was staggered through the months of March and April. The men began to leave the camps early in March and the final number left at the middle of April.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Had any considerable proportion left before the end of the month?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

Yes. I have not the actual figures, but the movement out began in March.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

But the final disruption took place in one day, on the 30th of April, and then the men congregated in Vancouver, where they produced the situation which is now before us. If the matter had been handled in the manner I have suggested the minister would have found, as he will still find, that a certain proportion of the men-and they are probably the men most open to suggestion from agitators and others of that sort-have no homes to go to. They have been travelling around as transients so long that neither Regina nor the province of Saskatchewan will recognize them and they will be repudiated there, so that they will certainly have to be taken care of in the province of British Columbia. However, we are faced with the situation and something must be done about it, and I am going to make a suggestion which I think might be considered.

These men have been excellently trained in bush work, logging and so on, a training that is of no use to them in the prairies. But there is plenty of work of that kind under government auspices that could be initiated at this moment, and I would mention one in particular. A number of years ago a lighthouse and wireless station was established at a place called Estevan Point. The coast is rocky and it is difficult to land supplies, so

Unemployed, Men in Vancouver

that lighthouse tenders were delayed on many occasions. It was decided to establish a better landing at a greater distance. The suggestion was made that, naturally, they would need communication in order to get oil, coal and other supplies, and against my strong recommendation it was decided not to 'build a light steel railway as had been already done for a shorter distance, but to make a road. I do not think it is unfair to say that this work was carried out in the worst possible manner. The road was carelessly located in the wrong place where it was foredoomed to failure and liable to be washed out. The result was that after a while we had to patch it up, and we are now patching up road that we first put down. As a matter of fact, we have not yet done the whole road. I drove over it in a Ford truck some time ago and covered the five miles in an hour and a quarter in low gear. That will give you an idea of the sort of road it is. I took the matter up with the department and in the course of time they recognized the mistake they had made. They had their engineers report on it and it was agreed to locate the road over a new site on a higher level; where for an expenditure of $30,000 originally a real road could have been made, a road that would cost almost nothing to maintain. As a matter of fact, we spent $15,000 to begin with and have been spending $3,000 every year for ten or fifteen years, and have nothing to show for that expenditure except a very bad road, indeed the burlesque of a road. The department concerned put an item of $30,000 in the estimates, but it does not appear in the supplementaries so I presume it fell by the wayside in that mysterious place known as the treasury board. That is money that could have been spent, not just to make work, but to make money for the government because once spent they would not have had to meet this annual maintenance charge. This is the season of the year that the work should be done, early summer coming on and the best of labour conditions. It is no good doing the work in the winter, with the perpetual wet that prevails there. You have these men idle in Vancouver, and probably half of them would be willing to go back to their homes, Those who have no homes but have this technical training in such work could be put to road building, which is exactly the work they have been trained for, and that would meet the emergent situation.

As the members from Vancouver have said, the situation is there and you have to deal with it now; it is no good theorizing about it. If that $30,000 had been set aside, or to

use the minister's words that amount of unallocated funds had been used to go on with the building of this road, the province of British Columbia has road-building machinery available and the money would have been spent with the best posible benefit, and with a very big return from the $30,000 expenditure, and it would meet the situation in Vancouver today. But if you go on simply talking about it and passing resolutions and saying what ought to have been done, what is going to be the situation in Vancouver? What damages will be collected from some government for the damage done to the hotel owing to its occupation by these men? I understand that the member for Kamloops (Mr. O'Neill) said that the aldermen united and gave $500 to get these men out. Who is going to pay the damages to the hotel? And who is going to get the men out of the post office? These questions are urgent and are here to-day. There is that road waiting to be built. It is not a political thing at all; it is intended to be done, and there are the men able and willing to do it and urgently needing the work. I suggest that the minister should consider it. It need be only a matter of hours before the work could be started. There is a report in the department by a competent engineer laying out where the route should be and its advantages over the present site.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
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IND

Martha Louise Black

Independent Conservative

Mrs. MARTHA LOUISE BLACK (Yukon):

Mr. Speaker, it seems to me that I need offer no apology for my courteously sympathetic words to the hon. Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers) the other evening. In fact, I can quite imagine myself at times feeling sorry for the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis) for perhaps a different reason. But we have on the coast, in Vancouver, a sore that is fast degenerating into a running sore. It is worse than a double nettle, and we have got to make up our minds to get rid of it. Undoubtedly many of these men who left the camps after a winter there had a little money, but I know from experience that men coming in from logging camps, where many of them have been working for high wages, spend practically every cent they have with them in a week or ten days or less than a month, and then they come to the agency begging for an advance on the work they are going to do next season. Youth is hot and adventurous and spends money freely on what we perhaps of the older generation call nonsense and foolishness.

I feel that I can speak fairly plainly now because the boy of mine who went over a year ago used frequently to visit the camps

Unemployed Men in Vancouver

of the unemployed under the previous government, and speaking in confidence to his mother he said, "Mother, the men in these camps are far better off than the privates in the army. They get money. They have the camps. They can come and go as they please. They are under no discipline. The privates in the army are in camps but they are under a very severe discipline." And he said, "My idea"-and it is my own idea now- "is that these men should either be put in camps to work constantly or join the army." We are begging men to join our army because we may need them some day. Why should we do that when we are taking care of men who are doing nothing? Far 'be it from me to advocate a Hitler or a Mussolini in this country. But when I hear young children to-day telling their mothers to "shut up"- "I hate you"- "I won't do it"-I wonder, Mr. Speaker, what we are breeding and what we are going to have in this and the coming generation? As I said the other day, boys in Vancouver, in British Columbia, from twelve to twenty years of age, are disobeying the law and being sent to the gaol and the penitentiary. Why? Because in the first place they have not been brought up properly at home. I am not ashamed to say now that when I was seventeen years old I spoke most disrespectfully to my mother, and my father knocked me down. When I gathered myself up he said, "Go to your room. Never let me hear you speak to your mother again in that manner." It was pretty hard discipline for a young girl, but I look back now and I thank God that I had such a father to discipline me, and he disciplined us all. If the children of to-day were disciplined as the children of that day were, we would have a better race. They are in some families.

On the coast of British Columbia, in Vancouver, we have a climate far better than any other climate in Canada, and naturally people tend to migrate there. I don't believe at all in saying, because you come from Saskatchewan, I in Alberta am not going to give you a mouthful; or, because you come from Nova Scotia, I here in Ontario will see you starve. Because, after all, we are all people of Canada. It is a federal matter. People should not be allowed to starve as long as they are willing to work. I do not care who the minister is, I do not care who the man or the woman is, whether it be prince or pauper; I can offer my sympathy to them when they are in personal sorrow or when they are labouring under great mental stress. A mother's heart perhaps is a little softer than the heart of an ordinary member

unmarried or one who has no children. She may be foolishly sentimental, according to others, but at the same time we can see far into the future. This is a marvellous land. From east to west there is everything to make the country desirable. We have unlimited resources, we have members from both sides of the house talking about the development of these resources, but they can be developed only by our hands. It is up to our younger people to have the opportunity to develop these resources, and surely the minister and the government will evolve a way of developing them.

I thought when relief was given in the first place, many years ago, that it was a mistake. I have never had anything for nothing; I have always had to work for it. I think all ablebodied men and women and children should have to work for all they get. It is a different matter with men who are not well and with women who are unable because of family duties to go outside and work, and we should have a paternal attitude towards them. But just as sure as there is a heaven overhead, if we are not going to go a little deeper into this matter of unemployment, some day we are going to have a revolution. I am not so much afraid of a revolution in this country as in a country where people have more of the Gallic or high-strung temperament. We shall be slow, but eventually we must look out for our unemployed or there will be trouble.

In British Columbia there is always more or less crime. The police of the neighbouring state of Washington shove their undesirables over to us, and in turn we shove our undesirables over to them, so I can well imagine that many of these unemployed men may not come from Ontario or Saskatchewan. They may come from the other side of the line; it is difficult to tell. But surely we cannot allow men to go in and take possession of a federal building. After all, that is ours, yours and mine; it is not the property of the people of Vancouver alone. Surely we cannot allow that to happen. We must not have riots, with broken heads, broken hearts and perhaps men killed now and then. We must think; we must work hard, and I have enough faith in the government of to-day to believe that they are doing the very best they possibly can, if not for the sake of the unemployed, if not for the sake of the individuals, at least for the sake of their own reputations. I cannot look at one side of the house and think those men are all the best that God put on earth, any more than I can look at the other side of the house and think those men are all the worst. I think

Unemployed Men in Vancouver

perhaps when hon. members criticize me and other hon. members of this house, in their hearts they may have the idea that they know what is right, or that they could solve the problem. I have no such idea. I do not know, and I feel sorry for those who have that burden to bear, but it is a burden they must assume. They have accepted these positions and they must bring us out of the mire of despond in which we now find ourselves.

Many of these unemployed men went to Vancouver with money in. their pockets. With care that money might have lasted two, three or four weeks, or perhaps two months. But, as I have said, young blood is hot, and the money goes quickly. Then they are led away by agitators, of whom, alas, there are far too many, not only on the prairies or in British Columbia, but all over Canada. Somebody with a glib tongue comes along to stir up those who are less glib or those not so well balanced.

Mr. T. J. O'NEILL (Kamloops): In asking my question to-day I seem to have stirred up a field day at the expense of the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers). I assure him I had not that intention, but in this discussion I have noticed something that I think should be mentioned at this time. The supplementary estimates have been just brought down, providing quite a large sum of money that will be used principally to relieve the unemployment situation. But it is now almost June 1. A good deal of that money is for public buildings, and after these estimates have been approved by the house plans must be prepared, tenders must be called for, and in all about three months will elapse before construction is actually started. By that time unfavourable weather conditions will have set in, and either the projects will have to be abandoned until next year or men will have to work under very adverse conditions and at much greater cost to the government than would be the case if we were ready to start work now.

I am not particularly directing these observations against the present government, because this sort of thing has gone on in this country for years and years. I do not know whether or not it is because of the fact that we have the fiscal year ending at the wrong time; I do not know whether that has anything to do with it. Personally I do not see why there should be any difference between the end of the calendar year and the end of the fiscal year, but certainly we should be starting work on these projects now instead of possibly the first of September. I know we

cannot correct that situation this year, but I think it is something every hon. member should take into consideration, to see if there is not some way of overcoming the difficulty so that work may be started in the spring of the year rather than in the fall.

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): I think there is a good deal of force to the remarks of the last speaker (Mr. O'Neill) but in considering the difficulty to which the hon. member has referred it may be helpful if I point out that with respect to the supplementary estimates now before the house I know that many departments have their plans well advanced in order to enable quick action to be taken with respect to many of the projects contemplated under the supplementary estimates. In order still further to facilitate action along that line I hope to ask the house either to-day or to-morrow for interim supply on the main estimates-this being necessary, of course, because of the near approach of the end of May, which is the limit of our present authority in that regard-and also for a proportion of the amounts involved in the supplementary estimates, in order that work may be provided as quickly as possible in connection with projects as to which the preliminary work has been done by the departments concerned.

The criticism of my hon. friend is quite proper and does apply to government work generally. You cannot proceed until you get your authorization; and even in asking for interim supply of course it must be a condition that the granting of such supply does not debar criticism or consideration of any individual item. That is the usual condition, but I just wanted to assure my hon. friend that every effort will be made by the departments concerned to get under way immediately with projects for which definite plans exist; and they do exist with respect to quite a number of matters contemplated by the various departments.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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LIB

Robert Emmett Finn

Liberal

Mr. R. E. FINN (Halifax):

When we consider this question of unemployment, which has been brought up on the motion to go into supply by the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis), supported by the hon. member for Kootenay East (Mr. Stevens), answered by the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers) and dealt with by the various other hon. members who have spoken this afternoon. including the only lady member in the house to-day, the hon. member for Yukon (Mrs. Black), I think it well that our attention should not be directed only to the three or four provinces west of Ontario. I think we

Unemployed Men in Vancouver

should have a thought also for the great provinces of Ontario and Quebec, and the maritime provinces as well.

I well remember walking out of this house after prorogation last year with my hon. friend the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Mackenzie). I was afraid that the closing of the camp at Halifax, on Citadel Hill, might be a mistake, that the expectations of the Minister of Labour might not be realized, and as we walked along I said to the Minister of National Defence, "Close it if you will, but keep it in such condition that if it is necessary to reopen it there will not be a single man forced to walk the streets, and there will be no crimes committed," such as we have heard mentioned this afternoon as having been committed in Vancouver. The minister did not make a positive reply, but what was said made me think, "Well, Citadel Hill, that great promontory in the city of Halifax, no longer will be used for this purpose even if we find that unemployment is inevitable," and unemployment apparently has become inevitable, not only in the city of Halifax. It has come to us through our fishermen along the shores of Halifax county. From Ecum Seeum for a distance of one hundred and fifteen miles to Dartmouth, and from Halifax city to Hubbard's Cove and the indented bays there has been this relentless enemy which has been ever at the door. I do not say this government has been wholly responsible, but I have read scrupulously the order in council passed by the late administration under the leadership of the present leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) in reference to trawlers. The Minister of Fisheries of that time was the Hon. E. N. Rhodes who, I regret to say, is ill. He stood tenaciously to protect the interests of the fishermen as against those of capitalists who had been responsible for the sores and the hurts in the minds and hearts of the fishermen along the shore. There came a day, there came an hour, and there came a moment when the present Minister of Fisheries (Mr. Michaud) came to a decision. His decision was absolutely against the fishermen and in favour of the privileged interests, in favour of the capitalists, and particularly the National Fish Company and the Maritime Fish Company organizations which have grown prosperous in the city of Halifax.

The fishermen were left where? They were left where they are at the present moment, with starvation in some of their own homes, with their boats and fishing gear swept away by the southeast gales. Some of them lost their lives, never to return to their homes. In

this connection, I believe I can give one of the best illustrations possible of description by the human mind or heart. In a little fishing village on the west coast of Halifax, a place which was once prosperous but is prosperous no more, a fisherman had lost everything, and had not the money wherewith to repair his humble little fishing home. During the late war a building had been erected in that small village, and when he wrote me the building was uninhabited, unoccupied and not being used in any way. This man told me that it was impossible to repair his home so as to make it habitable, that he had a wife and eight children and wanted to know if it would be possible to buy that building or to have some charitable person buy it for him so that he and his family might live in quiet comfort, and not be put out in the cold. When I received the letter I wrote to the minister I thought would be in charge, the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Mackenzie). He replied properly and correctly that the matter came under the jurisdiction of the military gentleman who was responsible for salvaging, and that the building would have to be put up to tender. That was done, and the man in question bid S42. He was met by a bid of $44 from another person, a man who did not need it. That man got the building, and the man who needed it did not get it.

Has everything the government has done been done by contract? Has that been done in all departments? "Necessity knows no law," and when it comes to a case of necessity I will get what I need to subsist on. There should be no need in this Canada of ours, a country with great prospects, expansive areas and a great future. When I think of our relations with the country to the south of us, a country smaller in area than Canada, but with a population of 130,000,000 people as against our 11,000,000. What is our future? We think of those who have lived in past days and who were the great builders in this great confederation. We think of the ideals of Sir John A. Macdonald, the ideals of Hon. Joseph Howe, the ideals of our great leader who has departed, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the man who envisioned the building of the Transcontinental railway so as to gather the maritime provinces under the wing of Canada and to bring them nearer the great Canadian centres in order that those eastern provinces might participate in the great Canada of the future. One need only read the schedule to this act respecting the Transcontinental railway to realize what happened. In that schedule it is stated in no uncertain words, in words that are true, that unless otherwise specifically

Unemployed Men in Vancouver

routed by the consignor, all goods shipped from Canada shall travel through Canada to Canadian ports. The development of Canada was to come through that. What has happened? He who runs may read.

I was deeply interested when a few days ago in the house a discussion arose between the Minister of Transport and an hon. member, and at that time I was reminded that in my belief the unmaking of Canada is that we own that stretch of the Grand Trunk running between Chicago and Detroit. If one studies the statistics respecting trade through Canadian ports he will find one thing and one only, namely that the stretch of railway between Chicago and Detroit helps the port of Montreal and American ports.. I am not opposed to that port. We realize that while our railway is within the confines of that country, and until we pass Windsor, at which time we come within the jurisdiction of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, we are subject to the interstate law of the United States. Their law is their law, and not ours. Notwithstanding the judgment of Mr. Fairweather, notwithstanding the judgment of the president of the Canadian National Railways system, I say it would be far better to sell that stretch of railway in the United States, to get what it is worth, and to have Canadian owned railways in Canadian territory, managed by Canadians and subject to the supreme will of Canada. Unless we do that, we will have a misnomer in the life of the future Canada we shall not live to see. Some of the younger hon. members may live to'see that day; I hope they will.

When I look across the floor of the house I am reminded that when I attended La Salle Academy in Halifax there was an oratorical contest for the gold medal donated by the then Archbishop O'Brien. One of the judges was the present member for St. Lawrence-St. George (Mr. Cahan), the late Secretary of State. Later, when I came to parliament again in 1935, I was walking out of the house one day during the first session, and the hon. gentleman said to me that he recalled the incident and said, "I made up my mind then that some day you would be in the parliament of Canada, but I never thought I would live to be here with you." He had thought he might- have gone to that great bourne from which no traveller returns. But to-day he sits there, with his years, lovely and beautiful, in the knowledge that he has tried to do his best for Canada and for the little province of Nova Scotia, down by the sounding sea,

in which he was born. He has tried to make it the finest and best of that galaxy of provinces which make up our great dominion.

There is one thing I would urge upon the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers). There is no hon. member of the government who is more assiduous in his duties, there is no one who applies himself more directly and effectively to the great problems that confront Canada in connection with labour and unemployment than the Minister of Labour. That work is his love. When the Prime Minister of Canada (Mr. Mackenzie King) called upon him to enter his cabinet he left the great university where he was teaching to come to teach all those in Canada that there is a broader field to greater knowledge. We cannot close our eyes to the fact that unemployment is ever existent. At times it has been characterized as a sore. I do not call it a sore, I consider it the inevitable aftermath of war. After the great war of 1914-18 we had a survival in business, but then came the great depression of 1929. We are now in the midst of what a very able exponent of peace, an hon. gentleman who guides the destinies of young Canada to-day, only a few days ago said, that it might be the dust of Canada that would turn the scales from peace to war.

In Great Britain we have that aJble, astute Prime Minister, Mr. Neville Chamberlain. He is uncompromising and what is more necessary, he is unbending. He will not yield to the foe, although he is always ready to give consideration to the different views of all parts of the British Empire. He should not be too trustful of those who might attack us behind our backs to-morrow. As Cassius said to Brutus:

There is my dagger,

And here my naked breast; within, a heart

Dearer than Plutus' mine, richer than gold:

If that thou be'st a Roman, take it forth;

I, that denied thee gold, will give my heart;

Strike, as thou didst at Caesar; for, I know,

When thou didst hate him worst, thou lovedst him better

Than ever thou lovedst Cassius.

I differ with the statement made this afternoon by the hon. member for the Yukon (Mrs. Black), and I think in retrospect she will agree with what I am about to say. I understood her to say that a man who could not give value deserved to be idle.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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IND

Martha Louise Black

Independent Conservative

Mrs. BLACK:

If he was in good health.

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LIB

Robert Emmett Finn

Liberal

Mr. FINN:

If he was in good health.

Speaking for my own province, and particularly for the city and county of Halifax, I may say that there are many people there who are in good health and who would like

Unemployed, Men in Vancouver

to have employment. I have always taken the stand that no man owes anything to any government, be it Liberal, Conservative or a government made up of some particular groups, as may happen sometimes. When a man is willing to work, then the nation owes him a living. The Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning) stated a short time ago that it was the intention of the Minister of Labour and the Minister of (Public Works (Mr. Cardin) to put the unemployed of Canada to work by means of the main and supplementary estimates. I was pleased to see that the supplementary estimates contained the means for providing employment throughout all the provinces of Canada, both according to the needs of the individual and according to the requirements that should be lived up to in connection with public works.

The glorious duty of every hon. member who sits here is to serve his country. We who sit here have the confidence of the people. We should address ourselves to the problems of our constituents and endeavour to get at what might be called the foundations of unemployment. I can remember one Sunday evening a week before that grand old man, the leader of Liberalism, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, died. I was sitting with him in Laurier House and he said something to me that I shall never forget. He said, "My dear Finn, hold on to British institutions. They are the finest and the best; they give us constitutional liberty and the finest thoughts that a Canadian could have as a member of the British Empire." That great man was misunderstood at times, and I know that if those words could have been spoken to someone who was not his friend, politically, he would have been even more admired before he died. But he has never been forgotten by those who loved him and many of whom pass daily by his monument which looks out on the city of Ottawa. Monuments are wonderful things, but the joyousness of doing something is within the power of the government, the Minister of Labour and the members of this house.

There are many homes in this country where all are sad when the father who has been looking for work comes home and says he has been unable to find it. There is hunger in these homes, not only of the stomach but of the heart. This is what is happening in the city of Halifax and in the county of Halifax. Yet the Minister of Fisheries (Mr. Michaud) dealt a tremendous blow to the fishermen along our coast when he granted trawler licences to the great interests in the

city. Not only did he do that, but he placed on a pedestal my colleague (Mr. Isnor), who turned from the fishermen to the capitalist with the excuse that there was $1,400,000 invested which he would have to look after. He was not interested in the fisherman. But there is always a day of reckoning; there is always a reply. I thank God that in my public life of nearly twentydive years I have always stood for the underdog without being unfair to the upper dog; and as the leopard cannot change his spots, no more can I. I wish there was a right of recall in this country. There is not, but I say sincerely that if my course in this house is not one that meets with the approval of the people who sent me here, let them make it known to me, and, Mr. Speaker, within the twinkling of an eye I will tender you my resignation, but there will be attached to it one principle conforming with a high standard of public life. I will hand back to my constituents the confidence they gave to me, but I will say when I am resigning that I think it would be proper, real and honourable that he who is elected with me, who was my helpmate by my side during the campaign, should also tender his resignation, and we would both go back to the people who sent us here. If he does not come back then he is wrong; if I do not come back I am wrong.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

You are both wrong.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Robert Emmett Finn

Liberal

Mr. FINN:

But there will be a sense of responsibility.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

You will both come back,

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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LIB

Robert Emmett Finn

Liberal

Mr. FINN:

We shall both come back? I want to say that if that is so, I don't want to come back. Open confession is good for the soul. "Ye cannot serve God and mammon." You must either stand for a principle or you must be against it. That was the great thought of Him who died for us all; they could not be for Him and against Him. Therefore there is the great dividing line, as there is on this green carpet, a dividing line between ourselves and the hon. gentlemen who sit opposite, but there is not sufficient room on this side of the house for all who think as we do, therefore some have to sit opposite and cast their lovely shadows on those who are doing their duty as members of the opposition and of the various groups who are intelligently giving themselves to their arduous tasks in the hours when parliament is dealing with these tremendous questions.

Supply-Agriculture

The thought I should like the Minister of Labour to convey to the Prime Minister and to that sturdy, wonderful man who comes from the province of Quebec, the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe), is that, the steady tide of criticism notwithstanding, his shrewdness, his boldness, are not begotten of something which is not within himself; God and nature endowed him with one thing-

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
Permalink
LIB

Robert Emmett Finn

Liberal

Mr. FINN:

Do not speak to me, Mr. Speaker, when I am speaking about God. God and nature endowed him with one lovely quality, and that is justice, as Minister of Justice-justice to all, fairness to everybody, and kindness to the whole of Canada.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
Subtopic:   CONCENTRATION OP SINGLE
Sub-subtopic:   UNEMPLOYED MEN IN VANCOUVER-STATEMENT OF MR. MACINNIS
Permalink

Motion agreed to, and the house went into committee of supply, Mr. Sanderson in the chair.


DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE

May 23, 1938