March 17, 1938

?

George Halsey Perley

Mr. PERLEY:

Will this be permanent or temporary?

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

This will be permanent.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink

Item agreed to. Unemployment assistance, $2,350,000.


LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

It is under this item that I am prepared to discuss anything connected with unemployment of ex-service men, and incidentally discuss the veterans' assistance commission report, the so-called Rattray report. I understand some of my hon. friends would like me to make some statement with respect to the attitude which we intend to adopt in connection with the report. I do not want to lead the committee into error. Properly speaking, as is known to most hon. members, the unemployment assistance provided under this vote really applies only to pensioners, but in order to have an appropriate item under which to discuss the case of non-

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

pensioners who are unemployed I have suggested to certain hon. members that that discussion take place on this item.

The veterans' assistance commission was set up in July, 1936. It operated until January 6, 1938. It toured the whole country and obtained all available information with respect to unemployment and kindred matters as relating to ex-service men. A report was filed with the department, which has been printed in blue-book form and has been tabled and placed in the hands of all hon. members.

The commission in that report made a number of recommendations. I propose to deal with them one by one. The first recommendation, found on page 65, deals with workshops. It recommends:

Workshops

Whilst it is agreed that the operation of workshops can be considered only as in its experimental stages and whilst appreciating the fact that owing to local conditions it might not be possible to establish workshops in all the important cities in Canada, yet the commission believes that it is justified in recommending :

That favourable consideration be given to any applications for assistance that might be received from the management of any workshop now in existence, or under consideration, providing that it can be shown that the workshop is justifying its existence in the community and that the continued employment of veterans in the workshop is necessary and the objective of revolving labour is being carried out.

This recommendation has been implemented as provision has been made in the estimates for the continuation of the workshops which were commenced by the veterans' assistance commission in Montreal and Regina; also for limited assistance, if necessary, to the workshop project in operation at Moose Jaw.

Montreal

The Montreal workshop was started in January, 1937, and the grants to date to finance its operations amount to $55,000. Eighty men are at present on the pay roll, and 329 men have graduated, through the workshop, to permanent employment in other organizations. This is the valuable feature and the primary objective of the workshop.

An employment division is operated in connection with the workshop and the honorary local committee, with the following results:

Total placements to February 28, 1938

Permanent 300

Semi-permanent 234

Casual 436

Probational training 86

1,056

Regina

A grant of $10,000 was made to assist in the development of a workshop at Regina. This was established on the 1st September, 1937, and operating quite successfully, the principal development being the salvaging of building materials. At the present time, a contract is in hand with the city for the demolition of a three-storey hotel building, and the erection of a one-storey store at a contract price of $1,480.

Moose Jaw

A grant of $1,000 was made to a board of trustees at Moose Jaw for the purpose of assisting the operations of a workshop, which has been going for two or three years.

The next recommendation was with respect to probational training:

Probational Training

Recommended that an application be made so as to permit the continuance of the probational training scheme beyond the end of the present fiscal year;

And that the Minister of Pensions and National Health be given discretion:

(a) In the matter of granting training to the younger type of veteran, even if a prospective employer is not in sight, providing that the honorary local committee and the department are satisfied that such training will more readily fit him for suitable employment.

(b) That discretion also be given to the Minister of Pensions and National Health whereby he may authorize the payment of tuition fees for any veteran, otherwise qualified, who may require a short period of coaching, or training, for the employment he seeks, providing that the applicant is willing to study in his own time and without any other expense to the government.

This recommendation of the commission has been implemented as provision has been made in the estimates of the department for the amount considered necessary to allow of the continuation of probational training for the next fiscal year.

Regarding the added recommendations (a) and (b), it is considered that the enabling authority P.C. 1004, dated the 5th May, 1937, allows the department to carry out these recommendations of the commission in special cases.

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

Probational Training Week ending March 12, 1938

Completed

Employed Not

as Employed Tourist retained On

District Started Disc'd trained otherwise guides by employer strengthMontreal .. 84 12 21 2 45 1 3Halifax .. 99 3 41 1 12 42Charlottetown.. .. . . 2 2 Ottawa .. 30 5 14 i 2 8Toronto . . 248 42 133 5 21 47Hamilton .. 25 5 11 9London .. 11 1 7 i 2W'indsor .. 3 2 1Winnipeg . . 49 3 23 2 21Regina . . 6 6 Edmonton . . 3 . . 3Calgary . . 15 8 i 6Vancouver . . 44 9 23 i 4 7Saint John .. 1 1 Total . . 620 80 292 10 45 44 149

Expenditure to date: $58,053.

The recommendations with respect to tools, equipment, transportation and repayment fund comes next:

Tools, Equipment, Transportation, Repayment Fund

That as long as the honorary local committees remain in active operation, a sum of money be placed at their disposal through the local units of the Department of Pensions and National Health, this to provide for:

(a) Supply of tools, equipment and transportation to unemployed veterans qualified to follow some recognized trade such as carpenter, mason, plasterer, tinsmith, plumber, et cetera.

(b) Where transportation only is required it is recommended that this be supplied to unemployed veterans proceeding to definite employment in any occupation.

This recommendation has been implemented as provision is being made for the continuation of this assistance, although it has only been taken advantage of to a very limited extent.

With respect to the Canadian corps of commissionaires:

Canadian Corps of Commissionaires

As it is very unlikely that organization of the Canadian corps of commissionaires can be satisfactorily completed throughout Canada by March 31, 1938,

It is recommended:

That favourable consideration be given to the matter of financing the corps' national headquarters' activities beyond the end of the present fiscal year.

This recommendation has been implemented, and limited assistance will be given to the headquarters organization of the corps for next fiscal year, for the reason that it is

considered that the success of this scheme depends to a very great extent on its becoming self-supporting.

The next recommendation was with respect to a survey of departments of federal government in connection with employment of veterans:

Survey of Departments of Federal Government

in connection with employment of veterans

The commission reaffirms the recommendation contained in its interim report covering a survey of government departments in connection with the employment of ex-service men:

That each department of the federal government be requested to make a complete survey at Ottawa and all branches in the provinces of:

(a) The possibility of absorbing a further number of veterans into government service:

(b) All positions under the jurisdiction of the civil service commission:

(c) All positions that are exempt from the procedure of the civil service commission;

(d) The survey to include harbours, canals, et cetera;

(e) The departments to supply information in the form of a report stating percentage of veterans employed in positions exempt from the provisions of the civil service commission;

That employment upon the projects conducted under the Department of National Defence should be reserved to veterans of the great war and members of the Canadian militia forces, with a preference given to the former;

That in order to promote the employment of a large number of veterans by contractors doing business with the federal government, such contractors be required to supply information as to the percentage of veterans employed, when tendering for government supplies of any kind whatsoever;

That all things being equal, the contractor who employs the largest proportion of ex-service men should have preference in the awarding of the contract;

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

That in order to set an example to private business firms, the government agree not to dismiss any ex-service men, except for misdemeanour, inability to perform duties in a satisfactory manner, or upon reaching the age limit for retirement.

I am afraid I am not quite clear as to what that recommendation meant. In so far as positions which come under the Civil Service Act are concerned, veterans already have a preference. I do not know what inquiry could be made to ascertain what further preference could be obtained. In any event the committee of this house now dealing with the civil service commission, if it so desired, could make an inquiry into that matter.

With respect to small holdings the commission recommends:

Small Holdings

The commission would not recommend that any more unemployed, either pensioners or non-pensioners, be placed on small holdings until sufficient time has passed to determine whether projects of this kind have a reasonable chance of being successful by making unemployed veterans self-supporting.

If these projects prove successful, and it is decided to increase the numbers,

The commission recommends:

That these be settled under the same control, conditions, supervision, and selection as those with which an experiment is now being made.

The following settlement schemes which are initiated under the direction of the commission are actively under way:

Toronto

Amount granted: $48,000.

This was intended to provide for the placement of 20 veterans and their families on small holdings. Fourteen veterans have been settled so far, and the committee are now investigating and arranging for the purchase of the balance of six holdings.

Windsor

Amount granted: $37,400.

The amount is intended to provide for the settlement of twenty families, and a section of land amounting to approximately 125 acres. Six families have already been settled, and it is expected that the full quota of twenty will be on the property by the 15th April, 1938.

Winnipeg

Amount granted: $16,000.

The Winnipeg committee have settled twelve veteran families, representing fifty-three individuals, on separate holdings. These vary from three to forty acres, and are situated from five to twenty-seven miles from the centre of Winnipeg.

(Mr. Power.]

The next heading is "employment of older type of veteran with dominion, provincial, municipal governments, also private business firms:"

Employment of Older Type of Veteran With Dominion Provincial, Municipal Governments, Also Private Business Firms

That the dominion and provincial governments, cities, municipalities and business firms, who operate superannuation and pension schemes for their employees, be urged to give sympathetic consideration to the employment of the older type of veteran who may have the requisite qualifications for certain positions less suitable for the younger men and yet who cannot fulfil the age qualification; these men to be accepted for employment on the understanding that they will sign a "waiver" of all claim to pension or superannuation on retirement or discharge.

As already indicated in this report, if men, who saw service in a theatre of actual war and who were domiciled in Canada at time of enlistment for service in the great war, should be accepted for these positions, they may on retirement or discharge, providing they are otherwise qualified, be granted war veterans' allowance.

That I take to be a more or less general recommendation, and I do not know just what specific implementation would be called for.

In connection with the employment of veterans on dominion-provincial projects it is recommended:

Employment of Veterans on Dominion-Provincial Projects It is recommended:

That provision be made in all agreements, covering projects to which the dominion government contributes part of the cost, for the employment of a reasonable quota of veterans, irrespective of whether they have been in receipt of relief during the first three months of the year or not.

It is further recommended:

That veterans in receipt of small disability pensions and relief assistance from the Department of Pensions and National Health be not debarred from employment on these projects.

That provision be made in all agreements, covering projects to which the dominion government contributes part of the cost, for the employment of a reasonable quota of veterans, irrespective of whether they have been in receipt of relief during the first three months of the year or not.

That is being studied; I cannot just say how it would be worked out.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
CON

Alfred Johnson Brooks

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROOKS:

Is there provision now for a certain percentage to be taken on contract work?

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

Dominion-provincial arrangement?

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
CON

Alfred Johnson Brooks

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROOKS:

Yes.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

I do not think so.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
CON

Alfred Johnson Brooks

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROOKS:

I understood there was.

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink
LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

No, I do not think so, but I shall look it up. There is a provision, of course, that no man shall be barred from employment on account of political affiliations, race or creed. But I do not know that in connection with dominion-provincial projects there is any special preference or quota for veterans.

Collection of Radio Licences

That the sale and collection of radio licences be assigned to veterans and that post offices, stores and others cease to handle the sale of these licences wherever it is possible to secure the services of ex-service men for this purpose.

In connection with the collection of radio licences I have made certain representations to the Minister of Transport. The subject is receiving consideration by his department. I should like to deal with it at a later date, because it requires further explanation. Briefly I would say this, as I have already said to various veteran organizations, that the best way for them to obtain their preference is to go together as veterans and put up some kind of proposition to the Minister of Transport whereby they would undertake the collection of all radio licences in Canada. I would have the combined veteran organizations lay before the Minister of Transport some specific plan. That would be in the interests of the soldiers and of the government, because the government would have only one person to deal with in connection with all radio licences. That suggestion has been made to the soldiers, and those to whom I mentioned it thought it was well worthy of consideration. So far, however, no specific action has been taken in the matter by any of the veterans' organizations.

With respect to the civil service preference to non-pensioners:

Civil Service Preference to Non-Pensioners

That veterans of the great war not in receipt of pension, but who are otherwise qualified and who served in His Majesty's forces, providing they saw service in a theatre of actual war. be given preference for positions in the civil service of Canada on an equal basis with pensioners when granted marks in the civil service examinations.

This recommendation will do away with the special preference granted to pensioners under the Civil Service Act, as it at present exists. I have referred this recommendation to the Secretary of State, in order that he might pass it on to the committee dealing with the civil service. I imagine it has already reached them.

In connection with superannuation or pension of federal civil servants and service in the great war, the commission recommends:

Superannuation or pension of federal civil servants and service in the great war The commission recommends:

That the Civil Service Superannuation Act, being chapter 24 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, should be so amended as to provide that the time spent on active service by members of the civil service of Canada, who saw service in the armed forces of the country during the great war, 1914-1918, may be counted for the purposes of superannuation.

This recommendation has been implemented to the extent that reference has been made to the Minister of Finance, for the reason that a change would be necessary to the superannuation act. The suggestion has been offered to him that he might refer the recommendation for the consideration of the parliamentary committee on the superannuation act.

With respect to the unemployed imperial veterans it is recommended:

Unemployed imperial veterans

That notwithstanding representations already made by the government of Canada to the British government, in connection with the problem of unemployed imperial veterans, now resident in this country,

It is recommended:

That a conference be arranged between representatives of both governments, this for the purpose of devising ways and means whereby these unemployed ex-service men who served in His Majesty's forces may be permanently rehabilitated in the land of their adoption or repatriated, if they so desire, to the British isles.

The commission feels that the position in which the unemployed ex-imperial soldier or sailor finds himself in Canada justifies immediate action on his behalf.

The commission stated they felt that the position in which the unemployed ex-imperial soldier or sailor found himself in Canada justified immediate action on his behalf.

Without any government intervention, towards the end of 1937, and I believe at the request of the Canadian legion, a representative of the British legion visited Canada in order to discuss with imperial veterans in this country problems affecting those veterans. I cannot say whether a report has yet been made, but I expect a report will be made to the Canadian legion, and should be published shortly.

With respect to hospitalization of imperial veterans I find this recommendation: Hospitalization of Imperial Veterans

That, in view of the fact that the number of Canadian veterans resident in the old country who are in receipt of disability pensions is about equal to the number of imperial veterans now resident in Canada who draw pensions for war disabilities from the imperial government.

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

It is recommended:

That consideration be given to the matter by the Canadian government with a view to arriving at a reciprocal arrangement with the British government whereby hospitalization and medical treatment will be extended by the British government to Canadian pensioners resident in the old country and by the Canadian government to imperial pensioners resident in Canada.

If a reciprocal arrangement could be arrived at, it would, in our opinion, do away with the necessity of rendering accounts for hospitalization and treatment in this connection and facilitate more prompt attention being given when treatment or hospitalization is required.

I can see no possibility of implementing this recommendation.

The British Ministry of Pensions has an office in Ottawa, which deals with all affairs relating to pensions and treatment for imperial veterans in Canada and the United States; and treatment is arranged, on repayment, through hospital facilities provided for by this department. The affairs of Canadian pensioners resident in Great Britain are dealt with through the office of the overseas representative of the department in London, England.

By order in council, P.C. 948, dated the 23rd April. 1937, provision has been made for class 2 treatment, at the expense of the Canadian government, for veterans who were pre-war residents of Canada and in receipt of pension for a disability due to service with His Majesty's forces during the late war.

The next recommendation is:

Indigent Veterans Who Served in a Theatre of Actual War in a Campaign Prior to the Great War

That a sum of money be provided each year to permit payment of a monthly allowance to indigent veterans, who have reached the age of sixty years and who were domiciled in Canada at time of enlistment for service in a war prior to the great war, providing that they saw service in a theatre of actual war and are in possession of an honourable discharge.

This recommendation has been implemented to the extent that an amendment was introduced to the War Veterans' Allowance Act to provide for the admission of veterans of the Pouth African war, on the same basis as veterans who served in the great war.

The next recommendation had to do with soldiers' clubs or hostels and reads:

Soldiers' Clubs or Hostels

The commission made a survey of the operation of a number of soldiers' clubs or hostels in Canada but has not yet had the opportunity of obtaining information covering the activities of the United States government in this connection.

Soldiers' homes in the United States are operated directly under the supervision of the government.

We recommend, therefore, that, in order that a complete report may be made available, a survey should be made of the United States system of handling soldiers' homes, and upon completion of which, a definite recommendation be forwarded by the commission, in the form of a supplementary report, to the Minister of Pensions and National Health not later than December 31, 1937.

This recommendation has been implemented to the extent that the commission was requested to make a survey and to submit recommendations. The recommendations which are contained in the report of the commission, dated the 5th January, 1938, are receiving the consideration of the department.

By order in council, P.C. 139, dated the 19th January, 1938, a grant of $2,500 was authorized to be paid to the Ottawa Branch of the Canadian Legion, B.E.S.L., for improvements and repairs to the property, or the purchase of equipment for the legion shelter at Ottawa.

By order in council, P.C. 138, dated the 19th January, 1938, approval was given for the payment of a grant of $10,000 to the Red Cross Society of Vancouver, such grant to be used for alterations to and equipment of any building that the red cross may secure for the purpose of a hostel for homeless ex-service men in Vancouver.

The next recommendation had to do with unfit veterans, and reads:

Unfit Veterans

That the War Veterans' Allowance Act be amended by removal of "age 55 years," where it refers to the granting of an allowance because of disability, preaging and general unfitness;

And further, that the act be amended so as to permit a more liberal interpretation of legislation covering the granting of the allowance at any age to a veteran who saw service in a theatre of actual war and who, because of his unfit condition, or other handicaps, is unable to maintain himself.

This recommendation has been implemented by the introduction of an amendment to the War Veterans' Allowance Act.

In connection with a provisional economic allowance for unemployed non-pensioned veterans, the recommendation reads:

Provisional Economic Allowance for Unemployed Non-Pensioned Veterans

That in the case of unemployed indigent veterans who are not in receipt of disability pension and who served in His Majesty's forces in a theatre of actual war and were domiciled in Canada at time of enlistment, unemployment assistance in the form of a provisional economic

rMr. Power.]

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

allowance be granted during such time as they are unemployed, through the Department of Pensions and National Health.

It is recommended:

That the maximum basic rate of allowance be:

Single men, $18.75 per month.

Man and dependent wife, $30 per month.

It is considered that dependent children are and should remain a responsibility of the provincial or municipal government concerned.

We also recommend:

That no allowance should be paid on behalf of the children of unemployed non-pensioned veterans who would benefit under this recommendation;

That it be understood that no unemployment assistance shall be granted by the department to an unemployed veteran unless he is registered with the Employment Service of Canada, or that evidence is produced to the department that work has been sought and is not available.

Should any veteran, without valid reason, refuse employment for which, in the opinion of medical officers, he is medically fit, he should be denied any allowance.

We strongly recommend that any veteran obtaining, or attempting to obtain, assistance from the Department of Pensions and National Health by fraudulent means should be prosecuted.

It is the opinion of the commission that no ex-service man or his dependents should forfeit their provincial or municipal rights as citizens because of the fact that the veteran concerned has or, if he is married, he and his wife have, been granted an allowance by the dominion government.

We further recommend:

That where application is made by a veteran for an allowance, such allowance shall be granted by the dominion government on the understanding that if he and his family are in receipt of relief, or are eligible for relief, from a provincial government or municipality, the granting and the acceptance of an allowance from the dominion government shall not relieve the province or municipality, in which he may be domiciled, from the responsibility of any obligations to the veteran or his family not covered by the payment of an allowance from dominion government sources;

And that it shall be understood and agreed that the province or municipality concerned will continue to accept responsibility for the payment of relief on behalf of any of the dependents of the veteran, not included in the allowance received from the dominion government;

And also that the provincial government or municipality shall in all cases provide such other welfare services to the veteran or, if he is married, to his dependents, as are unprovided for in the federal regulations covering the granting of the allowance or pension.

That is the main recommendation. An amendment which has been introduced to the War Veterans' Allowance Act is intended to provide for those who have been classified as partly fit and unfit by the commission, but it is not the intention of the government to make any provision for the payment of a

grant to those who have been classified by the commission as fit. As I stated the other day, the government prefers to proceed by way of endeavouring to find employment for these men. I want to repeat that the government does not think it should accept responsibility for the care and maintenance, whether by way of an economic allowance or otherwise, of 100 per cent fit men.

I should like to go a little further and say that in so far as I have been able to understand this particular recommendation of the veterans' assistance commission, it has not met with the support of the returned men themselves. I think I have received only one resolution favouring the implementation of this recommendation as made. Every other returned soldier organization has said that they did not want it because it was not enough. They have stated in specific terms that they will take this as a minimum, but they do not want it unless it is specifically understood by the department that the allowance of $18.75 for single men and $30 for married men is the minimum and not the maximum. They go beyond that and ask that non-pensioned unemployed men, not disabled, be given full relief at the expense of the dominion government. In the case of a married man with five or six or more children, that would mean $60 or $70 per month or more on the basis of the Winnipeg rates which are considered to be fairly good. So far as I am aware, there is no demand for the exact implementation of the report of the veterans' assistance commission by any large body of returned soldiers. So far as I am aware, it has only served for the apparent justification for greater demands being made on the treasury. If those demands were acceded to, the very purpose for which this economic allowance was recommended would disappear. The exact words of the recommendation are:

In recommending a basic rate, the commission does so because while it is enough to give them food and lodging, it is not enough to take from them the incentive to take work.

The reason for recommending this economic allowance was in order that the men might have an incentive to obtain work and not that they be maintained in anything like comfort. Every returned soldier organization has requested that at least a reasonably fair rate be granted to these unemployed, non^pen-sioned, non-disabled ex-soldiers.

I could go on at some greater length to discuss the policy of the department with respect to these men, but in view of the shortness of the time at my disposal this evening I would be quite prepared to discuss

Supply-Pensions-Unemployment

it further at another time. I should like to state to the committee what I believe is the policy that should be followed, generally speaking, by this department, and which I believe has been the aim and object of all governments and of all ministers in the past. This is the formula which has been evolved by the officers of the department, which I think I can say I explained to gatherings of returned soldiers in every section of the country since the last session of parliament and which, so far as the principle is concerned, has not met with any objection:

The first duty of the government is to those of the Canadian army who suffered injuries during service, and to the dependents of those who died.

Second, to those who have given service overseas and are now unable to earn a living owing to age or physical infirmity.

Third, to those yet capable of working but of themselves unable to find employment, by endeavouring to provide facilities and by obtaining the local cooperation and support which will assist in their return to the industrial life of the country.

These provide for consideration, first, to those who served in the Canadian forces; second, to those who were in Canada at the outbreak of the war; and, third, in a more limited degree, to those who came to Canada within a reasonable time after the termination of the war.

I think that statement covers pretty well the general policy not only of myself but of previous ministers with respect to returned soldiers generally, and I think if I remain within the four corners of that I am substantially following what I believe the Canadian people want. I do not think that at present the people of this country are prepared to support and take as a direct responsibility the care of men who are now a municipal responsibility and are not being left to starve because they are being looked after by the municipalities-men who are physically fit and might be forty or forty-five years of age; in fact, two thirds of those reported by the commission as unemployed and fit are below fifty. I do not believe the country wants to pay these fit men an allowance for the rest of their lives.

Item stands.

Progress reported.

On motion of Mr. Mackenzie King the house adjourned at 11.15 p.m.

[Mr. Power.1

Friday, March 18, 1938

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
Subtopic:   PERMANENT MILITARY AND AIR FORCE SERVICE TO BE INCLUDED FOR PENSION PURPOSES
Permalink

March 17, 1938