March 17, 1938

DOMINION FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INSPECTORS

LIB

Mr. LAPOINTE (Matapedia-Matane):

Liberal

1. How many fruit and vegetable inspectors does the government maintain in each province of the dominion?

2. Are they appointed by the civil service commission? If so, since when?

3. Was knowledge of the French language always required by said commission from such inspectors in the province of Quebec?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   DOMINION FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INSPECTORS
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PETITIONS OF RIGHT


On the orders of the day:


CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. C. H. CAHAN (St. Lawrence-St. George):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe) of which I gave him informal notice some days ago.

During the session of 1936 the Minister of Justice gave an assurance that a bill would be prepared by the Department of Justice to amend the existing law with respect to petitions of right against the crown. On March 24, 1937, the Minister of Justice informed the house that a draft bill had been prepared and submitted to the various departments of the government, preparatory to being submitted for approval of the governor general in council, but that more time was required for the final preparation of the bill. The Minister of Justice, however, then renewed his assurance for the present session

of parliament. Is it the intention of the government to introduce such a bill during the present session of parliament?

Topic:   PETITIONS OF RIGHT
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Right Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, the matter is one which presents certain difficulties, and as I said last year, the various departments of the government have been communicated with in regard to this matter. As a result of that consultation a draft bill has been prepared which would meet at least to a large extent the views of the hon. gentleman. This draft bill, I must say, has not yet been considered by the governor in council, and I am awaiting the first opportunity to lay it before my colleagues. I hope it will be possible to introduce it afterwards.

Topic:   PETITIONS OF RIGHT
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CURRENCY AND CREDIT

REPORTED STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AS TO CONTROL-INQUIRY AS TO LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM


On the orders of the day:


SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. E. G. HANSELL (Macleod):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). Pursuant to press reports that the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) has stated in Edmonton that the government expects to have complete control of currency and credit by 1945, I would ask: is the legislative program of the government complete for this session, and if not, may we expect any legislation to be brought down that will change the present structure of the banking system?

Topic:   CURRENCY AND CREDIT
Subtopic:   REPORTED STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AS TO CONTROL-INQUIRY AS TO LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I have not seen the press report to which my hon. friend has referred. I would wish to see the statement itself and also to ascertain how accurate it is before attempting to comment upon it.

With regard to the question which my hon. friend has just put concerning the legislative program of the government, I would say to him that the program will not be completed until the session of parliament itself is completed. As to whether any legislation of the character mentioned will be brought down, I can only say that the government will make its policy known on that as well as on other matters as the occasion arises.

Topic:   CURRENCY AND CREDIT
Subtopic:   REPORTED STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AS TO CONTROL-INQUIRY AS TO LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM
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SPANISH CIVIL WAR

EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, before we proceed with the

Spanish Civil War

orders of the day I should like to address a question to the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). As it is now definitely established that the German and Italian governments have sent large numbers of troops, equipped with all the essentials of modern warfare, to fight against the legitimate government of Spain, will the Canadian government immediately remove the embargo imposed last year on exports to Spain? Failing that, will the government extend the embargo to include exports to Germany and Italy?

Topic:   SPANISH CIVIL WAR
Subtopic:   EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

My hon. friend was good enough to give me notice of this question. I would say to him in the first instance that his question appears to be a little out of order, in that it seeks to convey information- whether accurate or inaccurate I cannot say- rather than to seek it. However, my reply to the question is this: no embargo has been placed on exports to Spain. The embargo imposed last year applies only to exports of arms and munitions. This action followed similar action by the members of the nonintervention committee, representing twenty-seven European countries. Though Canada was not in a position to supply any appreciable quantity of arms or munitions, this course was followed in order to prevent exports from Canada contributing in any way to render ineffective the efforts of the signatories to confine the struggle to Spanish territory. The European countries primarily concerned have taken no action such as is proposed by the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis). The Canadian government does not propose to take such action. No exports of munitions have been made from Canada to Germany or to Italy.

May I add to what I have said in the way of a formal reply to my hon. friend that at this time we are witnessing momentous events on the continent of Europe. We are witnessing also momentous events on the continent of Asia. Canada lies midway between the two as a part of the continent of north America. Unless it is the desire to have it appear that our country is anxious to participate in these events, to become a party to or a part of what is happening on the continents of Europe and Asia, it is desirable, I believe, that all persons in positions of authority and responsibility in this country and who have anything to do with the shaping and moulding of public opinion, whether in parliament or in the press, should refrain from taking any steps or making any representations which would appear to have a contrary aim and purpose. Moreover I think we should be particularly guarded in what

we say and what we do for the further reason that we should wish at all cost to avoid making the present appalling situation on the two continents I have mentioned more embarrassing for the countries faced with it, in their efforts to work out a solution.

Topic:   SPANISH CIVIL WAR
Subtopic:   EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS
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CCF

James Shaver Woodsworth

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

In view of the Prime Minister's statement, will the government then put an embargo on war materials going into Japan?

Topic:   SPANISH CIVIL WAR
Subtopic:   EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

I had hoped that possibly without inquiry the Prime Minister would be disposed to make some statement to this house regarding the government's appreciation of the European situation. While Canada is a part of the north American continent, we are profoundly concerned about what is now happening in Europe; and with the wider knowledge and fuller information that the government possesses, it did occur to me that the Prime Minister might think the time had come to make some statement, as I have said, on the government's appreciation of that situation so far as it affects this country. I concur in what the Prime Minister said a moment ago, but surely if in the parliament of Great Britain a discussion can be carried on of the kind that the newspapers report, no harm can result from having the head of the government in this country indicate what the government's appreciation of the situation may be. There is a vast difference between an acrimonious debate and a statement or appreciation of a position. We may easily fall into a wrong attitude of mind with respect to this matter. It is idle to say that we have not the right to discuss any matter that affects the welfare of the Canadian people. If England can discuss it in the manner in which it was discussed, surely Canadians are not doing them a disservice if we ascertain the views of the government with respect to these matters in the light of their fuller information than is accorded to the average man.

Topic:   SPANISH CIVIL WAR
Subtopic:   EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I was going to precede what I had to say, although on second thoughts it did not seem necessary to do so, with the observation that I hoped no one in this house would seek to draw wrong inferences from my statement. Practically all statements are capable of different interpretations. There is no statement that can be made at the present time with respect to world affairs which, if persons wish to be partisan in their attitude, cannot be interpreted in different ways. What I said will be understood, I believe, by the Canadian people as being a frank expression of the view which the government takes regarding

Electric Power Export

the events which I have spoken of as happening on the continent of Europe and the continent of Asia. I have said nothing whatever to indicate any desire on the part of the government to limit in any way freedom of debate in this house with respect to any question. That freedom exists at all times; it is the right of every hon. member to exercise it in his own discretion. My right hon. friend, the leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett), has just said that the government gets wider information and gains a fuller knowledge of conditions, through dispatches which it is receiving from Europe, than possibly hon. members may obtain through the agency of the press. In regard to that may I say that such knowledge and information as the government have received through the dispatches which have come to us from Europe and from Asia only serve to confirm the wisdom of the statement which I made a moment ago in reply to the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis). I wish to repeat that if any useful purpose is going to be served, in respect to the situation either in Europe or Asia, by having these matters debated at great length, then, if hon, members so decide, the government will seek to place no restriction upon their utterances; but the government must, with respect to its own utterances, make them in the light of the responsibility which attaches to everything the government says at this time.

Topic:   SPANISH CIVIL WAR
Subtopic:   EMBARGO ON EXPORTS-EUROPEAN SITUATION- ARMS AND MUNITIONS
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ELECTRIC POWER

March 17, 1938