February 16, 1938

THE UNION JACK

DISPATCH FROM COLONIAL SECRETARY REFERRED TO IN DEBATE ON A CANADIAN FLAG


On the order for motions:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Yesterday the right hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) asked if I would lay on the table the dispatch from Colonial Secretary Harcourt concerning the flag that is flown in Canada, to which reference had been made on the previous evening. I have the dispatch in my hand and I think it would be of interest to hon. members generally to be apprised of it. If the house will permit, I should like to read the communications. The first is:

Ebenezer, Saskatchewan, Canada, March 11, 1911.

The Secretary,

His Imperial Majesty,

King George V.

My Lord,

I am the teacher at one of the public schools in the Canadian northwest.

An order has recently been issued by the department of education that every school in the dominion shall fly the national flag, and there seems some uncertainty amongst the people in this locality as to the flag this school shall have. I hold that the Union Jack pure and simple, is the national flag of the British empire throughout the world; but find some people on this side of the Atlantic have a notion that the "red ensign" with Canadian coat of arms (the naval flag) should be used in Canada.

IMr. Howe.3

I shall be much obliged therefore if you would say which is in order.

Trusting to receive the favour of your reply. I beg, etc.,

John F. Stedman.

Colonial Secretary Harcourt wrote to the Governor General in connection with this letter as follows:

Downing Street,

12 April, 1911.

My Lord,

I have the honour to transmit to Your Excellency a copy of a letter received by the King's private secretary from Mr. J. F. Stedman respecting the national flag to be flown in Canada.

I shall be glad if Your Excellency will cause the writer to be informed that the Union Jack is the national flag of Canada as of all other parts of His Majesty's dominions.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient, humble servant,

L. Harcourt.

Governor General,

His Excellency,

The Right Honourable,

Earl Grey, G.C.M.G., G.C.Y.O.,

&c. &c.

There are two other communications I should like to read, the first being:

Ottawa, Ontario,

2nd May, 1912.

The Secretary of State for the Colonies,

London.

Dear Sir,

Will you kindly inform me what is, according to correct usage, the proper flag for a citizen of the British empire to use in his own grounds or on his house on say 24th May or Dominion day or other occasion when flags are used.

I mean by this, is the red ensign correct on land: as it is said by some to be the exclusive flag of the merchant marine. Is the flag of Canada correct for this decorative purpose? (Red ensign with badge of Canada in the fly.) Is the Union Jack correct? May any or all of these flags be used by a private citizen, who has no official rank?

Kindly address me, care of the general office: National Transcontinental railway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Yours very truly,

George S. Hodgins.

The next communication, reads:

Downing Street,

21st May, 1912.

Sir:

I have the honour to transmit to your Royal Highness a copy of a letter from Mr. G. S. Hodgins in regard to the flag which should be used by private persons who are British subjects.

Questions

2. I should be glad if you would be good enough to cause Mr. Hodgins to be informed that the Union flag is the national flag of Canada as of all other parts of His Majesty's dominions, and may be flown on land by all British subjects: and that the red ensign, with the arms of the dominion of Canada in the fly, is intended to be used only by Canadian merchant vessels.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your Royal Highness' most obedient humble servant,

L. Harcourt.

Governor General His Royal Highness

The Duke of Connaught and of Strathearn,

Topic:   THE UNION JACK
Subtopic:   DISPATCH FROM COLONIAL SECRETARY REFERRED TO IN DEBATE ON A CANADIAN FLAG
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K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.C.V.O.,


&c., &e., &c.,


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

It will be remembered that I directed the attention of the house to the fact that the colonial secretary did not of his own motion undertake to declare officially what was the Canadian flag. It will be recalled that I made that quite clear on the pages of Hansard. My argument has been abundantly verified; for it will be observed that Mr. Harcourt was simply answering a question which had been directed to His Majesty the King by a citizen in Saskatchewan. It would hardly be correct to say that that was the first official statement as to what the flag of Canada was; for there was a circular showing that the official flag of the whole British Empire was what was called the union jack, and it was not until long after that, that there was any question of any other flag being used by any part of the king's dominions. But the point I tried to make was that under no circumstances did the colonial secretary undertake to indicate what the position was except in answer to an inquiry directed to the king by the teacher in Saskatchewan.

Topic:   K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.C.V.O.,
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker, I did not intend to discuss the matter, but what my right hon. friend has just stated makes it necessary for me to point out that what he has said is not entirely correct. It is correct with respect to one of the communications I read, but not with respect to the other. The second communication was from George S. Hodgins of Ottawa, addressed to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, London, not to the secretary of His Majesty at all, asking if he could be informed as to the correct usage in respect to the flag, and the secretary of state replied to the governor general-there was no reference to His Majesty or to His Majesty's secretary-that he would be glad if the governor general would cause Mr. Hodgins to be informed that the union flag was the national flag of Canada.

Topic:   K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.C.V.O.,
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

And it was in answer to an inquiry. That is the point I was making.

Topic:   K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.C.V.O.,
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OPIUM AND NARCOTIC DRUG ACT


Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of Pensions and National Health) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 24, to amend the Opium and Narcotic Drug Act, 1929. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-EMPLOYEES

LIB

Joseph Oscar Lefebre Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. BOULANGER:

What are the names, duties and salaries of employees of the Department of Agriculture of Quebec who carry out work controlled and paid for by the federal Department of Agriculture?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-EMPLOYEES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET (for Mr. Gardiner):

Nil.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-EMPLOYEES
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RUSSIAN COAL IMPORTATIONS

CON

Frank Exton Lennard

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LENNARD:

How many tons of coal were imported into Canada from Russia during the twelve months ending December 31, 1937?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN COAL IMPORTATIONS
Permalink
LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

146.656 tons (of 2,000 pounds).

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN COAL IMPORTATIONS
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CANADIAN WHEAT BOARD

February 16, 1938