April 9, 1937

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Sea or land.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

The like has never been seen to my knowledge. It is not anything. I recognize in it a little piece of a halibut, a little piece of a herring, and so on. If the Minister of Agriculture were going to put on similar advertising, I suppose there would be an object part horse and part cow, with a touch of a hog in it, and flavoured with goat.

Supply Miscellaneous

Does the minister not think it would be much better to refrain from trying to deceive the public with a thing like that? I think if it represents anything, the nearest fish it comes to is a trout. But why not change the illustration and have, one day a herring, the next day a cod, the next day a halibut, the next day a haddock, and so on, with a suitable recipe instead of suggesting that the public try this recipe for kippered herring scallop, for this fish is not a herring. It would be better to have, as I suggest, a recipe concerning the fish depicted in the particular advertisement. After all, the idea is to persuade people to buy fish. But here is a picture of this marine animal being caught apparently with a rod and line. That does not encourage the housewife to buy fish. It might encourage a sportsman to go out and catch an object like this if he could find it, but the minister's idea is to encourage the housewife to go out and buy some specific fish, and how seeing this poor hybrid caught with a hook is going to persuade her to do that, I do not know. It would be much better to make the advertisement more practical and have a picture of a cod or a halibut so that the housewife could know what it was when she saw it, and also to have each day a recipe appropriate to the fish advertised.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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Item agreed to. Employment and Social Insurance Act, $40,000.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

As I said the other evening, I do not believe that any of this amount will be required, but I am not sure. Some unforeseen necessity may arise.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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Item agreed to. Statue of the late Sir Arthur G. Doughty, to be erected in front of the dominion archives building, $15,000.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

There is a word I desire to say with respect to this item. The late Sir Wilfrid Laurier said that but for Sir Charles Tupper there would have been no confederation, and one thing that has given me concern is the fact that there is no statue on these grounds to his memory. I have no criticism to make of the statue to be erected to Sir Arthur Doughty in front of the building housing the archives, which he so splendidly established. But in view of what Sir Wilfrid Laurier said on the death of Sir Charles Tupper I suggest that we should make provision for a statue to be erected to him. Had we been in sufficient funds when the late government was in power, provision would certainly have been made between 1930 and 1935 for the purpose, but as money was urgently required for other purposes it was not done. The language of Sir Wilfrid Laurier was quite strong-but for Sir Charles Tupper there

would have been no confederation-and it is but fitting that there should be a memorial to the memory of the man but for whom, in the opinion of one of his great contemporaries to whom he was opposed, there would have been no confederation. I take advantage of this vote to make that observation, at the same time paying a tribute to Sir Arthur Doughty and the great work he has done for the future of Canada. I am not quite sure that the erection of a statue is the best tribute. The Prime Minister thinks it will be. and as there is always room for differences of opinion it is, of course, quite clear that his views in the matter should prevail. I trust that the memorial to be erected to his memory will be one that will remind future generations of the great debt that is owed to him because of what he did for the archives of the country, which are of extreme value not only to Canadians but to all those who desire to know the early history of the North American continent.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

One thought amongst others underlying the erection of a statue to the memory of Sir Arthur Doughty is that for the most part our statues have been erected only to statesmen or generals, there being few, if any, to members of the civil service. Sir Arthur was a great public servant who, as my right hon. friend has said, 'was more responsible than all others combined, for the splendid department of government known as the archives. It was essentially his creation. The administration felt that to commemorate his life and work by the erection of a statue of suitable design in association with the archives buildings, possibly immediately in front of the building, would be an eminently appropriate form of recognition. Members of all parties in the house and leaders of previous governments will, I believe, agree that permanent recognition of Sir Arthur Doughty's splendid services to our country is more than merited.

I am glad that my right hon. friend has called the attention of the government to the circumstance that up to the present no monument has been erected on the parliament grounds to the late Sir Charles Tupper. I believe the country generally will feel that fitting recognition should be given one whose part in confederation and in the history of the country was that which my right hon. friend has described as having been taken by Sir Charles Tupper. I may say to my right hon. friend that the government will be pleased to consider what may be most advisable in the way of recognition.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES
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Item agreed to. Resolutions reported. Coronation of King George VI


SUPPLY-CONCURRENCE


Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance) moved: That the reports of the committee of supply-made to this house on January 19, 22, 26, February 2, 5, 8, 9, 11, 19, 22, 23, 25, 26, March 1, 31, April 1, 5, 7, be now received, read a second time and concurred in. Motion agreed to. Resolutions reported, read the second time and concurred in.


WAYS AND MEANS

SUPPLY BILL


Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance) moved that the house go into committee of ways and means. Motion agreed to and the house went into committee, Mr. Sanderson in the chair.


LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING moved:

Resolved, that towards making good the supply granted to His Majesty on account of certain expenses of the public service for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1938, the sum of $278,368,607.50 be granted out of the consolidated revenue fund of Canada.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SUPPLY BILL
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Motion agreed to. Resolution reported, read the second time and concurred in. Mr. Dunning thereupon moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 118, for granting to His Majesty certain sums of money for the public service for the fiscal year ending the 31st March, 1938. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May we revert, Mr. Speaker, to the order, introduction of bills, to enable the Minister of National Revenue to introduce the bill which appears on the order paper, so that it may have first reading tonight?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SUPPLY BILL
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EXCISE ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of National Revenue) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 119, to amend the Excise Act. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time. It being twenty minutes after twelve o'clock, the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. Saturday, April 10, 1937


April 9, 1937