February 4, 1937

?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Put it on Hansard.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Malcolm McLean

Liberal

Mr. McLEAN (Melfort):

Read it.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

I refer to Canada's exports of nickel and its derivatives, by hundredweight, to the chief importing countries for the fisical years ended March 31. I know the hon. member for Weyburn (Mr. Douglas) has seen this report, but I contend that he has drawn false conclusions from the figures.

The total exports of nickel in hundredweights were:

Year 100 pounds

1927 624,447

1928 782,285

1929 1,074,822

1930 1,065,175

1931 819,293

1932 543,791

1933 325,607

1934 1,066,421

1935 1,195,025

1936 1,609,252

Great Britain and the United States are the greatest importers.

Great Britain imported, in hundredweights:

Year 100 pounds

1927 243,305

1928 346,639

1929 303,638

1930 138,284

1931 319,569

1932 198,755

1933 59,976

1934 340,393

1935 444,358

1936 607,906

The United States imported:

Year 100 pounds

1927 300,097

1928 317,511

1929 619,596

1930 790,511

1931 407,455

1932 247,871

1933 156,706

1934 515,893

1935 526,699

1936 721,986

The Netherlands imported:

Year 100 pounds

1927 75,558

1928 101,696

1929 95,733

1930 88,487

1931 24,056

1932 19,889

1933 ' 28,274

1934 102,882

1935 70,673

1936 123,008

As the hon. member said, this shows the increase of exports to neutrals.

At this point let me observe that I cannot understand how an embargo or restrictions can be placed on the exportation of nickel. Those who import it will give all kinds of misinformation before, during or after war.

In the years enumerated the imports for Norway were as follows:

Year 106 pounds

1930 874

1931 36,656

1932 51,464

1933 69,517

1934 88,850

1935 108,181

1936 111,462

Let us take Germany, the bugbear of which wp are so much afraid. Her imports were:

Year 100 pounds

1927 1,823

1928 6,528

1929 15.726

1930 3,284

1931 6.597

1932 9,885

1933 2.512

1934 8,303

1935 1,910

1936 833

These are all hundredweight.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

What about Italy?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

These are the figures for Italy:

Year 100 pounds

1927 1,121

1928 4,502

1929 7,270

1930 7,758

1931 7,620

1932 3.363

1933 3,254

1934 2,575

1935 12,711

1936 25,114

War Measures-Mr. Hurtubise

The figures for France are:

Year 100 pounds

1927 Nil

1928 538

1929 23,827

1930 24,748

1931 879

1932 1,202

1933 115

1934 457

1935 1.864

1936 3,885

The figures for Japan are:

Year 100 pounds

1927 2,543

1928 4,516

1929 8,692

1930 1,991

1931 2,989

1932 3,821

1933 2,466

1934 7,009

1935 23,841

1936 14,312

Let me give now the total figures for foreign countries:

Year 100 pounds

1927 381,142

1928 435,640

1929 771,184

1930 926,888

1931 499,724

1932 345,033

1933 265,625

1934 725,969

1935 750,594

1936 1,001,232

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. DOUGLAS:

What is the source of these figures?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

The bureau of statistics. As I have said, the different alloys which the manufacturers of nickel in Canada produce and export are rendering a great service not only to this country but to all the nations of the world, and it is not by any means in the manufacture of armaments only that their nickel is used. The nickel is produced in Copper Cliff, three and a half miles from where I live, and I know the conditions there. Some hon. members are under the impression that the manufacturers are concerned only with armaments; that they are ogres; that they are great profiteers, and that their workmen are labouring like slaves and are badly taken care of. Let me take this opportunity to say I know for a fact that not only is this industry making a great contribution to the welfare of Canada but its labourers are the best-treated in the country. I do not have them with me, but in my files I have circulars from the labour defence league, which is a branch of the communist organization that is working so hard in Canada. These circulars make interesting reading. When the Inter-31111-37

national Nickel Company almost closed down for a while for repairs or reconstruction, these people were cursing the company for not making use of a sufficient number of men, and now that the company is using more men and treating them well, what do we find? If an accident happens, if a man is killed, they put up posters all over the city to convey the impression that the workmen are being cruelly treated.

I can assure the house that in addition to research work the company is spending unlimited amounts to prevent accidents. Accidents will happen in any industry, in any walk of life, no matter what precautions we may take against them; they cannot be altogether eliminated. I can, however, vouch for the fact that the company is making every effort and spending considerable sums of money to protect its employees. Not only that, but it is taking care of them from the social point of view. Last fall when the communists around Sudbury were spreading propaganda with respect to the treatment the labouring classes were supposed to be receiving from the company, I went to the officials and asked for a report to show what the company was doing for its men and what its operations meant, not only for that district, but for the dominion. I have in my hand a report given me in September, and according to the figures set out in this report I find that in the ten years from 1926 to 1935 the company paid in wages and salaries, $84,000,000; in materials, $69,000,000, and in freight, power and dividends, $47,000,000, creating per annum an average of $20,000,000 in direct Canadian buying power. On the basis of present operations the company spent in Canada during 1936, in labour and salaries, $15,800,000; in materials, $12,500,000, and in freight, power and dividends, $8,700,000, thus creating in 1936 a total of $37,000,000 in direct Canadian buying power.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

What were their total profits last year?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

I shall come to that in a moment. The estimated capital expenditure of the International Nickel Company in 1936 for Canadian labour and materials was $11,000,000. The company used more than 250,000 tons of Canadian coal. I said at the beginning that this company is making a contribution to Canadian life, in furnishing employment, in buying Canadian materials and in many other ways. On the basis of present operations the company will use in a year 53,000,000 feet of Canadian lumber. This would provide steady employment for a year for a lumber camp of more than 1,000

War Measures-Mr. Hurtubise

men. The company at present has more than 9,000 employees, which means that it is providing a livelihood for some 20,000 people in Canadian homes, and through its purchases the company provides a livelihood for an additional 20,000 people in Canada.

I hope I have been able to prove that the International Nickel Company have no connection with the manufacture of armaments. Their greatest ambition is to get away altogether from it. They cannot prevent some nickel from going for use in armaments, as will steel, copper or any other metal. But why discriminate against nickel when it can be proven that only a very sm-all percentage goes to armaments, and that is uncontrollable? Why not say as much against copper or any other metal?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

We would.

Mr, HURTUBISE: I have been in this

house for seven years and the only talk of embargoes and restrictions on the export of metal has always been in regard to nickel, as if it were the only metal used in armaments. I know, because I am in close contact with what is being done; I talk with those concerned every year and I know the efforts they are making to extend the use of nickel in every industry in this and all other countries, and to lessen- its -use as much as possible for armaments. Why discriminate against this company? The hon. member for Weybum (Mr. Douglas) as well as others who have spoken are far away from it; how can they judge of the program of the company? I am at closer range, and as I knew this question was to come up, I made it my business to procure these figures. I am more than, ever convinced that this discrimination against the International Nickel Company is antinational; it is nothing but the thin end of the wedge of socialism. One speaker said tonight it was not their ambition to socialize everything. Well, it is nothing but the thin end of the wedge leading to nationalization of all our industries. Would -the -nationalization of the manufacture of nickel in Canada give better results than those I have demonstrated? I cannot think it would give more work, or better accommodation for their labouring men.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Thomas Clement (Tommy) Douglas

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. DOUGLAS:

Or more profits to the

shareholders.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

The hon. member has

not reached that yet.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

Nationalization could

not give as much protection and satisfaction bo the employees. If we enter upon a socialization policy the results would be what

they are in Russia. We have to take one or the other, socialization and communism or the profit system.

Not only has the International Nickel Company made a contribution from the scientific -point of view, from the labour point of view, -but it has brought into the coffers of the Minister of Finance over $3,000,000.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWTELL:

What were its profits last year?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

Last year its profits were over $23,000,000. But that has to be compared with its total production. If you do a $25,000 business and make $1,000 profit, how does this compare with such an enterprise as the International Nickel Company m-aking $23,000,000 profit? The ratio is no greater. I say it is pure and simple discrimination against that company.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

It has not hurt them any.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

Why discriminate against them? There are other industries in this country making big profits. Why should- the International Nickel Company be blamed if they make the average rate of profit that the others do? It is because they are intelligent men and know their business that they succeed. If others fail, it is because they have not the proper men at the head of their organization.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

They pay big income taxes.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Raoul Hurtubise

Liberal

Mr. HURTUBISE:

Yes, they pay according to their amount of work and their profits. They are on the same basis as any other company. If one compares the amount of business they do in on-e year with that done by other companies, are their profits any bigger than those of the other companies?

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink
?

An hon. MEMBER:

Yes, they are.

Topic:   WAR MEASURES
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR CONSCRIPTION OF ALL AGENCIES AND RESOURCES FOR DURATION OF HOSTILITIES
Permalink

February 4, 1937