February 3, 1937

LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

Is the figure of 300 for British Columbia or for Vancouver?

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

For Vancouver. The figures would have been larger had they included the province of British Columbia. This does not take into account the number who are not registered as being on relief or the numbers in homes or out on small ranches or elsewhere who would be glad to accept employment were they given the opportunity. While I do not like to picture a wintery aspect of the city of Vancouver, which is something unusual as we have had this year unprecedented winter weather, I have a paper which reached me here the other day-and I should like the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers) to take note of this-a picture of 400 men many of whom had stood in line all through the night waiting for a job next morning to shovel snow.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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UFOL

Agnes Campbell Macphail

United Farmers of Ontario-Labour

Miss MACPHAIL:

Did the mayor of Vancouver when he was in England not urge emigration to Canada?

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

The former mayor of Vancouver can very well answer for his own statements. I would never presume to speak for him. But, Mr. Speaker, I again call to the attention of the minister-and it is something I think he believes-that while there may be the odd man here and there in the country who is not willing to work, the fact that men will stand in line all night long in the hope of being given employment the following morning in shovelling snow is ample evidence that we still have in this dominion hundreds of men, young and otherwise, who are willing to work if only they are given an opportunity. Nevertheless we find here a company receiving an annual subsidy of over $700,000, which tells this House of Commons, irrespective of what request is made, "We are

not going to hire Canadians; we are going to hire men from Hong Kong because we believe that they are better sailors." If they were telling the truth they would say, "Chinamen are more docile; they are more easily handled; they will not kick up a fuss over bad treatment and they work for low wages."

The company was ordered to take the deck crews off. The matter, I understand, was taken up by the Department of Trade and Commerce through its officials, and the other day I received a return in connection with this. One point that particularly struck me was that they were negotiating through the Department of Trade and Commerce, and when they made the statement that there were no men available they suddenly switched the correspondence to the deputy minister of marine. Surely a corporation with high officials such as theirs did not do that just out of ignorance. They had been dealing right along with the Department of Trade and Commerce; yet the statement they made to the government that there were no Canadians available is suddenly switched to the attention of an. official in another department who has nothing whatever to do with the matter under discussion and is not conversant with the details. I take strong exception to the statement that there are no men available. I have in my hand official particulars-and I repeat them-of the numbers of men in Vancouver alone who are available for these ships, but they will never be acceptable to this company so long as it can hire cheap labour from the orient. I for one do not propose to allow them to get away with that kind of policy.

It is strange that every country in the world with the exception of Canada looks after its own nationals. I would point out the possible seriousness of what could take place with 486 orientals on one of these ships, carrying only a nucleus or handful of white men. It is well known, to those in British Columbia at least, that there is no love lost between the Japanese and the Chinese, and were any trouble to arise I wonder how long the Japanese would allow ships carrying 486 Chinamen on board to sail between the two ports. In my resolution I was not advocating that the ships be manned one hundred per cent by Canadians, for I quite realize that a certain percentage of passengers are returning Japanese or Chinese. I was, however, asking that a greater number of white men or men of Canadian or British birth be employed on these ships. When one takes into consideration the statement made under oath that the average passenger list is from sixty to sixty-five per cent oriental,

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Reid

it is not too much to ask that the Canadians employed shall represent say thirty or thirty-five per cent of the crew. At the present time the percentage of officers, Canadian or British, is roughly fifteen per cent and in some instances it is below fifteen per cent of the crew. The great majority of thooj employed on these ships are orientals; 486 is the figure in one instance, and I have figures for all the others, the total on four ships being approximately 1,900.

I have in my hand a statement made by the president of the company, Sir Edward Beatty, and he advises the business men of the country to speak up-"speak your mind," he says. Of course, I do not believe he really intended that I should speak my mind in this connection and say what I think about the Canadian Pacific railway doing anything like this. If he goes to the old country and advocates emigration to Canada, or when he advocates immigration when speaking in Canada, I should like him to tell the facts as they are. Let him say. "Yes; we want immigration; we want people to come to Canada, but remember when you come here we are no.t going to hire you because we prefer Chinamen." I wonder what the people of the old country would think if he told them the truth-because that is the truth. We want population; oh, yes, we want people to come here. But when it comes to giving them employment, oh no; they are not good enough; Chinamen are better seamen; they work for lower wages and so on. Would he tell the people of the old country all the facts? Would he tell them that? If he did, I venture to say that he would need a strong bodyguard to escort him back to his ship or hotel.

I shall make this suggestion to the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Mackenzie) and I think it is a matter that should be discussed in this house. We have perhaps only the nucleus of a navy, but young men entering that navy, such as it is, go in as cadets. After taking their course of training what do they find? They find themselves on the street, or at any rate looking for employment.' Would it not be a fine gesture to find openings for these cadets on these ships? In the event of trouble there would be trained men to meet the situation. But what hope is there for us in training seamen with any national spirit at all if, after they have received their training as naval cadets, they find themselves confronted with a situation where there are 486 Chinamen on board each of these ships, there being no room for any one of these cadets, and a company such

3U11-33

as the Canadian Pacific railway declaring its preference for orientals.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Norman McLeod Rogers (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. ROGERS:

I know the hon. member

wishes to be fair, and I am bound to say that I shall shortly have occasion to agree with much that he has said, but it would be well to make it clear that he is referring solely to the Pacific service of the Canadian Pacific railway.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

I thought that was understood, because I have confined my remarks to the service on the Pacific. The principle, of course, is the same right through. I do not know the conditions on the Atlantic. Evidence was given before the committee, and perhaps there are members of the committee who can speak with more authority than I can with regard to the service on the Atlantic. At any rate a greater number of Canadians or men of British birth are employed on the Atlantic than on the Pacific. I am speaking, however, of those cadets who come out after receiving their training, only to find themselves without employment, with nothing facing them but relief. I suggest to the Minister of National Defence that this angle of the question should be studied. The serious part of the matter is that this company came back with the old argument that there were no men available on the Pacific coast. They said, "We have investigated the situation and have found this and that." Well, they were not looking very keenly for men. They did inquire of the shipping master in the port of Vancouver, but as is well known, few seamen ever go near the shipping master in their search for employment. But even if they did, what does the shipping master say? I interviewed him a month prior to leaving for the house and he said that there were at least eighty-five men registered and available. I believe that was the figure quoted from the provincial government as to the number idle in Vancouver, and it is ample proof that large numbers of men could be available were this company willing to take them on. But suppose there were no seamen available; does anyone say that at least some of those 400 men who fought for jobs and stayed up all night would not be glad to be taken on as deck-hands on these ships? And how can anyone learn to be a deck-hand unless he is given a chance? The only way to become an able-bodied seaman is to be given an opportunity to work on a ship.

I am going to close my remarks by urging upon the government and the house the seriousness of this matter. I know it is being viewed seriously in British Columbia, not only because of the lack of employment for our

514 COMMONS

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Maclnnis

own people but in view of the fact that this company has declared, "We are not going to heed the request made by parliament." I urge the house to accept this resolution and to enforce its provisions until such time as this company accedes to the request that has been made by parliament.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

As one of those who served last year on the committee on industrial and international relations, which dealt with the subject matter of the resolution proposed by the hon. member for New Westminster (Mr. Reid); in view of the fact that the recommendation of the committee was unanimous, and as I have been trying for the past five or six years, whenever this subsidy item has been before the house, to elicit some assurance that before the subsidy was paid some check would be made in connection with wages and. working conditions of the crews employed on the Canadian Pacific ships, I unhesitatingly support the motion.

The hon. member for New Westminster made his remarks brief. I know there is much more he could have said had he thought it necessary. I also will speak briefly. I should like, however, to bring to the attention of the house a comparison of wages now paid to the Chinese crews on these ships and the wages that would be paid to Canadian seamen replacing them. This comparison was placed before the committee by a representative of the Canadian Pacific steamships last year.

The comparisons are for the four Empress boats on the Pacific. These ships have Chinese crews numbering in all 1,768. If Canadian seamen were employed to take their places it is assumed that a smaller number would be required, namely, 1,475. The number of Chinese employed on the decks is 277, and the monthly wages total 82,925, or an average of S10.55 each per month. If Canadian citizens were doing the same work, the number required would be 186, and the total monthly pay-roll would be $9,040 or an average per person of $48.60. It is not difficult to see why the Canadian Pacific steamships prefer Chinese to Canadian seamen on their ships, when the additional wage would amount to $38.05 per person per month.

Coming to the other ratings you find a similar situation. In the engine rooms they employ 558 Chinese. The number of Canadians which would be necessary is nearly the same, 537. The monthly wage for 558 Chinese totals $6,045, or an average of $10.83 per person. If Canadians were employed in the engine room the total monthly wages would be $25,345, and the average per person, $57.99.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

William Allen Walsh

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WALSH:

If the hon. gentleman will

permit a question, in making these comparisons is he comparing equal grades of work in all instances, engine work with engine work, and so on?

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. MacINNIS:

Yes, in all instances.

These figures are embodied in a statement, included in the records of the committee, given by Mr. Flintoft, representing the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.

It is not necessary to go over all the figures. The yearly total of present wages for a Chinese crew is $203,880. The total if the company had to employ Canadian seamen would be $929,808. It is largely, therefore, a matter of dollars and cents, but not altogether that; it is that and something more. We were told by the same representatives that, employing Chinese, they can shift them from one service to another, which could not be done with white sailors. I asked whether these men had an organization which could take up grievances with the proper officials of the company. I was told that they had no such organization, that the company dealt with each man individually. Now my understanding is that the crews for these boats are supplied by an agency in Hong Kong, and that these agencies control almost the very lives of the men so supplied. This house would be doing something worth while if it stipulated that before any further subsidies be paid to the Canadian Pacific steamships for this service the government or the department would have to be satisfied that the wages and working conditions on the boats were comparable to those prevailing on similar boats either in this country or in other countries.

At some other time I may bring up the matter more specifically, but this year at the international labour conference I believe six conventions were passed relating to wages and working conditions of men who follow the sea for their living. Ours is a maritime country and sooner or later this government will have to consider ratifying these agreements. I am quite satisfied that the conditions at present prevailing on Canadian Pacific boats will not fit in with the conventions adopted at the international labour conference. Therefore we might as well take the matter in hand now so that in this respect we may be on what more nearly approaches an even basis with other maritime countries.

Mr. GORDON B. ISNOR (Halifax): I was a member of the committee which dealt with this question, and although I am from the extreme east I am in hearty accord with the

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Isnor

resolution of the hon. member for New Westminister (Mr. Reid). He approached the question in a very reasonable manner. On the committee last year all the groups in this house were represented. The case was presented and the evidence submitted in the same reasonable manner. The recommendation submitted to the committee by the subcommittee was accepted unanimously and presented to this house, where it was approved, so that it seems to me the two companies involved, the Canadian Pacific steamships and the Canadian National steamships, should be compelled to abide by the decision.

The question is one of principle, and it was definitely shown by the evidence that it has a direct bearing on the unemployment problem. The necessary seamen are available among Canadians on the British Columbia coast, therefore the Canadian Pacific steamships should make use of their services in preference to those of men of other nationalities. The same condition exists on the Atlantic coast, and it is with that in view that I approach the subject, having regard to the non-compliance of the Canadian National steamships with the very reasonable recommendation or request of parliament.

As will be seen at page 211 of Hansard for January 25, 1937, I asked several questions dealing with the number of people employed by the Canadian National Steamships, with particular regard to masters, pursers, doctors, engineers, plumbers and electricians, firemen and oilers and stewards. In nearly every case, Mr. Speaker-and I say this advisedly- the answers submitted to the Minister of Transport and in turn tabled by him were camouflage. They evaded the question by referring to British bom subjects. The question we were dealing with in our committee and in this house was the employment of a greater number of Canadians. I feel that if we are to have resolutions carried out after they have been adopted by this house we must have the support of the minister in charge of the department, and he must see that the officials under his jurisdiction do not send to him answers such as were tabled in reply to the questions I asked. I say that in a kindly way, but' nevertheless I urge that the answers submitted to the minister certainly were not in keeping with his position as head of a large railway and steamship system. I am not satisfied with the answers I received, and I intend to pursue the matter further.

I am glad this resolution has been brought up, because it gives me an opportunity of definitely supporting the stand that has been

taken by the hon. member for New Westminster. I need not go over this whole question; the ground has been very thoroughly covered by the mover of the resolution. I believe that the principle should be supported by every member of the house. Why should we appoint a committee to spend hours, days, weeks and months listening to evidence under oath and to make a finding- and I say it was a very reasonable finding, not calculated to disturb the existing set-up -if we do not see that the finding is carried into effect? The report only asked, in regard to the Pacific coast, that of some 2,033 employees some 277 in one particular department should be replaced. That was in the department comprising the deck-hands, which was efficiently operated up to 1913 by white seamen. It would mean a few dollars extra as far as the company is concerned, but in very large measure it would relieve unemployment among seamen on the Pacific coast. I think the Minister of Labour (Mr. Rogers) should take that point into very serious consideration, and from that angle I should think he is more or less duty bound to support this resolution. I know he is sincere in his desire to bring about a greater measure of employment among Canadian citizens. That being so, he should support a move which has for its object the greater employment of Canadian seamen on the Pacific coast.

What applies to the Pacific coast applies equally to the Atlantic coast. The request made in that connection was very fair. A complete replacement as far as the West Indies service was concerned was not asked; a fifty per cent replacement was recommended'. I should like to read that recommendation. After giving a large number of sound reasons the committee said1:

In view of the above and other reasons presented, it is respectfully recommended that, m so far as the Atlantic coast is concerned, the Canadian National Steamships Limited be advised that it is not suggested nor desirable to change the general set-up of the officers and engineers in so far as Canadians are concerned, but that this company be requested to employ a greater number of Canadian citizens, par-tmuiarly as applying to positions in connection with the steward's and firemen's departments, and your committee recommends that at least fifty per cent of those employed in these two departments be Canadian citizens, domiciled in Canada.

I say that was a very reasonable request, but what has happened ? They have practically ignored that recommendation. On December 6 I drew attention to the fact that at the end of another nine days, on December 15, six months would have elapsed since the recommendation was made by this house.

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. McIntosh

Up to that time I think something like thirteen or fifteen men were employed. Quite recently they advised me that I would be pleased to learn that they had employed fifty-nine men throughout the maritime provinces. I say that is not good enough, Mr. Speaker. I think the Minister of Transport would be well advised to bear in mind that a recommendation approved by this house should be placed before the Canadian National Steamships in such a way that the spirit of the resolution will be fully carried out.

I do not think I need add anything further. As I have already said, I am supporting the resolution because I believe the general principle is sound, and I believe it is a step that will bring about greater employment among our Canadian citizens and to that extent relieve the unemployment that exists to-day.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. DANIEL McIVOR (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask a question.

I was a memher of this committee; I listened to the evidence given before it, but I would like to have my memory refreshed. In the evidence given before the committee was it not brought out that one Canadian would do as much work as two or three Chinese?

Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford): Since I was chairman of the committee on industrial and international relations, Mr. Speaker, and thus had something to do with the investigation into this question and the report that is now before the house, it might be well for me to make a brief statement in connection with that committee, its investigation and its report.

I think hon. members are well aware of the fact that the committee on industrial and international relations was established about 1924 or 1925. There has been some discussion as to whether or not this committee should be divided. The suggestion has been made that there should be one committee to deal with industrial questions and another to deal with international questions. Up to the present this suggestion has not been followed out and we still have one committee which deals sometimes with purely industrial questions and sometimes with purely international questions, or the both combined.

The question before the committee last year was both industrial and international in scope. This committee, like all standing committees, was representative of the membership of the house. I believe there were thirty members making up the committee and its membership was fairly representative of the house as a whole. The committee gave the matter every consideration, and its report

was unanimous. Further than that, the decision of the house with reference to this report was also unanimous. Here we have a picture of what took place. A committee of the house investigated this industrial and international matter; the report of the committee was adopted unanimously in the committee and accepted unanimously in the house. The report had reference to two of the great shipping companies of the dominion, the Canadian National (West Indies Steamships) Limited, and the Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited. Reference has been made in the house to the fact that the Canadian National has taken some action in connection with the report. The hon. member for Halifax (Mr. Isnor) has just stated that this company has taken partial action in this connection. I think that hon. members who keep in touch with committee reports have a feeling that Canadian National Steamships Limited have accepted this report in the right spirit. We look for further action in this regard. The action taken up to the present would lead members of the committee to believe that all that is necessary to be done is for the responsible minister to direct the attention of the Canadian National Steamships Limited to the limited action they have taken on the report or have same repeated if it has already been done. I think we can look for a total acceptance of the report by that company in the near future.

But what about Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited? What has that company done with regard to the report? The feeling seems to be that up to the present nothing has been done. I would not want to see the matter referred again to the committee for further investigation. I believe that when a committee investigates a matter referred to it by the house and brings in a unanimous report, that should settle it. Any further action should be taken by the government. I believe the committee on industrial and international relations did its work successfully in this regard and any further reference to it would be a mistake. In explanation, may I say I took -the same stand last year when the matter of pensions for the blind came before the house. This matter had been investigated by a committee and reported upon, but no action had been taken. The question was raised in the house as to whether or not there should be a further reference to a committee, and I took the stand that there should not be. I think that stand has been supported by the fact that the govern-

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. MacNicol

ment has taken action this year in this regard, and that pensions for the blind are a reality without any further investigation.

There is still hope that the Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited will reconsider this report and do its best to follow out the recommendations made therein. That is my candid conviction. Perhaps the next move therefore ought to be an investigation by the Department of Trade and Commerce to see whether the men desired by the Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited for deck service are available. If we have well trained Canadians available for this shipping service, they should be employed even though it is necessary to pay them more. This means we should know exactly where we stand as a House of Commons on the question and have all the facts at our disposal. The Canadian Pacific should foe given a square deal in this matter, and its fullest explanation sought. I believe the Department of Trade and Commerce should get in touch with the company and investigate the availability of Canadian seamen for the work required. If the investigation were started as soon as possible and the facts disclosed, we would then know just exactly where we stand.

I am not placing any blame upon any department of the government, but as chairman of that committee I should like to see the matter cleared up for good. I am confident that if the problem were tackled in the right way that is cooperatively by the Canadian Pacific, the Department of Trade and Commerce and the Labour department as well, if it is thought necessary, a solution no doubt could be obtained in the very near future.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. R. MacNICOL (Davenport):

Mr. Speaker, I was also a member of the committee which met last year and listened carefully to all the evidence submitted to it. As a member of the house I voted in favour of the report of the committee, and I believe I ought to make a brief statement with reference to the resolution now under consideration.

Before going into detail may I say that I observed a good deal of applause from the government benches when the hon. member (Mr. Reid) introduced the vitally important resolution now before us. The applause would seem to indicate that if it goes to a vote those who applauded so vigorously will not do as they did yesterday, after they had applauded the motion of the hon. member for Kootenay West (Mr. Esling) in connection with an amendment to the Copyright Amendment Act of 1931. Yesterday hon. members opposite who were in the house applauded the motion most vigorously.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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SC

Otto Buchanan Elliott

Social Credit

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

There is no objection to applauding.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE (Quebec East):

We applauded a good speech.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

The Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe) cannot get away with that. When the vote was called quite a number of hon. members left the chamber, and those who came in for the vote like good children stepped up to the front and did as they were told. They voted against that which had been applauded by hon. members who were in their seats. I hope there will be a little more stamina in their backbones to-day. Although at the moment I am not stating whether or not I should support the resolution, may I say it is of such tremendous importance that I do not believe we should be hasty in coming to a decision. I notice the Postmaster General is looking at me earnestly.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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SC

Otto Buchanan Elliott

Social Credit

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

I am not

applauding.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

Upon looking at the

minister's estimates I notice a subsidy of

S600.000, which must have been endorsed by the government, to be given to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to carry mail to the orient.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
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SC

Otto Buchanan Elliott

Social Credit

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

In what department?

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

Under the Postmaster

General, at page 38 of the estimates.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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SC

Otto Buchanan Elliott

Social Credit

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

Look again.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacNICOL:

The minister should have the information without asking me for it. I refer to page 38 of the estimates, under the heading "Mail Subsidies and Steamship Subventions." However, this is a small item so far as the Post Office Department is concerned, and probably the minister has forgotten it.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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February 3, 1937