February 3, 1937

MEADOWVILLE STATION, N.S., MAIL SERVCE

CON

Mr. BROOKS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When were tenders last received for mail courier service R.R. No. 1, Meadowville Station, Pictou county, Nova Scotia?

2. What is the name of each person who tendered, and the amount of each person's tender ?

Motions for Papers

3. Is the contract awarded? If so, to what person, and for what amount?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MEADOWVILLE STATION, N.S., MAIL SERVCE
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SC

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

Social Credit

1. 10th July, 1936.

2. John Robert Holt, West Branch River John, $600; James Blaekie, Meadowville $649; Edward Charles Hansford, Pictou No. 3 R.R., $675; Daniel R. Sutherland, Meadowville Stn., No. 1 R.R., $749; Leod Murray, Meadowville Stn., $775.

3. Yes. John Robert Holt at $600 per annum.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MEADOWVILLE STATION, N.S., MAIL SERVCE
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CON

Mr. BROOKS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When were tenders last received for mail courier service R.R. No. 2. Meadowville Station, Pictou county, Nova Scotia?

2. What is the name of each person who tendered, and the amount of each person's tender ?

3. Is the contract awarded? If so, to what person, and for what amount?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MEADOWVILLE STATION, N.S., MAIL SERVCE
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SC

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex):

Social Credit

1. 18th December, 1936.

2. and 3. The contract has been awarded to the lowest tenderer. Information respecting tenderers and amounts will be furnished as soon as contract is executed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MEADOWVILLE STATION, N.S., MAIL SERVCE
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QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS

DUTY ON CORN

CON

Mr. EDWARDS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was a duty placed on corn coming into Canada?

2. If so, at what date, and (a) what was the rate of duty; (b) to what country did it apply?

3. Was this duty removed during years 1935 or 1936?

4. If so, (a) on what date did free entry become effective; (b) what amount of corn was imported since the suspension of the duty; (c) what quantities from each country shipping corn into Canada?

5. Is there a duty on corn imports now in force?

6. If so, when did it become effective?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   DUTY ON CORN
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CANADIAN MILITIA-HONORARY COLONELS

LIB

Mr. POULIOT:

Liberal

1. What are the names and addresses of the honorary colonels of the Canadian militia?

2. (a) On what date was each of them appointed; (b) for what record of military services, and (c) upon whose recommendation?

3. What are their functions?

4. What formalities are required for the appointment of an honorary colonel?

5. Are they supplied with uniforms and arms by the state?

6. If so, with what uniforms and what arms, and what is the annual cost for each individual?

7. Are the honorary colonels required to pay a tax, or any contribution or hororarium to the state in such capacity?

8. If so, is same paid before or after their appointment has been published in the Canada Gazette, and how much?

9. What do the honorary colonels cost the country?

10. In their capacity as such, how much do they pay to the state?

11. What services have the honorary colonels, as such, rendered to the state to date?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN MILITIA-HONORARY COLONELS
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MOTIONS FOR PAPERS

NEWCASTLE, ALTA., POSTMASTERSHIP

SC

Victor Quelch

Social Credit

Mr. QUELCH (for Mr. Johnston, Bow River):

For a copy of all correspondence, telegrams, charges, evidence and other documents, dated from June 1, 1936, to date, regarding the dismissal of the postmistress of Newcastle, Alberta.

Also a statement showing the reasons assigned for dismissal and the name or names of the person or persons who assumed responsibility for or furnished such information.

Topic:   MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   NEWCASTLE, ALTA., POSTMASTERSHIP
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FOUNDERING OF THE "SAND MERCHANT"

CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

For a copy of all letters, telegrams and other documents in the possession of the government, relative to the foundering of the ship Sand Merchant, in Lake Erie, October 17, 1936.

Also a copy of evidence taken by Mr. Justice Errol MacDougall relative to the matter, along with a copy of his report.

Also a list of the owners of the said vessel.

Topic:   FOUNDERING OF THE "SAND MERCHANT"
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

May I say to the hon. member that the department has only one copy of the evidence and one of the report. The evidence runs into 567 pages, and the report comprises 22 pages. If the hon. member . would permit us to lend him the report and evidence it would save a great deal of time in the department.

Topic:   FOUNDERING OF THE "SAND MERCHANT"
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

I shall be satisfied with the judge's report. It is nothing but a -whitewash, anyway.

Topic:   FOUNDERING OF THE "SAND MERCHANT"
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PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING

PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN

LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster) moved:

Whereas a resolution was introduced into parliament and debated the 26th February, 1936, asking that "in the opinion of this house the government take such steps as will provide for employment of greater numbers of -white Canadian citizens, on all ships and vessels of Canadian ownership and registration, the owners of which receive sums of money from the public treasury of Canada";

And whereas, the resolution after debate was referred to the standing committee on industrial and international relations;

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Reid

And whereas, the committee held numerous sittings and likewise heard numerous witnesses on the subject matter of the resolution;

And whereas, after hearing all evidence presented to it, the committee recommended,-

1. That, in view of the substantial subsidy granted yearly to the Canadian-Australian line by Canada, the small number of Canadians employed in its service be brought to the attention of the company, and that they be requested to afford Canadian seamen a reasonable degree of employment at the earliest possible convenience.

2. That, as up to the year 1913, the decks of the Empress boats were manned by white seamen, and in as much as the deck service is an important and responsible branch of the work of these boats, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company be requested to replace with Canadian seamen, the orientals now so employed, rnd that this change be made at the company's earliest opportunity.

And whereas, the recommendation presented by the committee passed the House of Commons unanimously, and thereby became an order of parliament;

And whereas, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company has ignored the instructions and has not complied with the order given by parliament, whereby Canadian seamen were to be given employment as deck hands in preference to orientals,

Therefore be it resolved,-That, in the opinion of this house, no further moneys from the treasury of Canada by way of subsidy be given to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company towards the operations of the Empress ships operating betw'een Vancouver and the orient, until such times as they do obey the order of parliament, by replacing the Chinese seamen now employed and engaging Canadian seamen on the deck service of the subsidized ships operating between Vancouver and the orient.

He said: Mr. Speaker, hon. members will

perhaps recall that last year I introduced a resolution stating that great numbers of Canadian seamen on the Pacific coast were out of employment; that owners of ships and vessels of Canadian registry on the Pacific coast of British Columbia were giving employment in large measure to great numbers of orientals; that other countries give greater consideration to the employment of their own nationals on ships and vessels belonging to their own country; that the Canadian government grant large sums of money to the owners of ships and vessels by way of subsidies, and that it was desirable that every encouragement be given for the employment of our own nationals. My motion ended with these words;

Therefore, be it resolved, that, in the opinion of this house, the government take such steps as will provide for employment of greater numbers of white Canadian citizens on all ships and vessels of Canadian ownership and registry, the owners of which receive sums of money from the public treasury of Canada.

An amendment to my motion was offered, and finally the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Euler) moved that the matter be referred to the committee on industrial and international relations for discussion and investigation.

Many meetings of the committee were held; witnesses were brought from the Pacific coast. The steamship company most interested brought its chief witness from the city of Vancouver, and was also ably represented before the committee by Mr. Flintoft, general counsel for the Canadian Pacific Railway-Company. It is safe to say that every aspect of the matter was considered carefully and fully. After due deliberation the chairman of the committee, the hon. member for North Battleford (Mr. McIntosh) presented a final report, which was adopted on June 17.

May I draw the attention of hon. members to what was agreed to last year. I shall be as brief as possible, realizing that I have discussed the question for at least three or four years, but I should like to take time to place before hon. members part of the report accepted by the house. Dealing first with coastwise shipping, the report states:

1. As regards coastwise shipping, the work is done by Canadians mainly, and their is no issue.

2. Shipping to Australia and the antipodes is carried on by the Canadian-Australian line. This company, which receives an annual subsidy of $300,000 from the Canadian government, employs but eight Canadians in the crews of five hundred and ten men.

The committee went into the question of oriental shipping, pointing out the great numbers of orientals engaged on ships plying between the port of Vancouver and Chinese ports. As a result of their investigations they recommended:

1. That, in view of the substantial subsidy granted yearly to the Canadian-Australian line by Canada, the small number of Canadians employed in its service be brought to the attention of the company, and that they be requested to afford Canadian seamen a reasonable degree of employment at the earliest possible convenience.

I believe that in large measure this request was met by the company in question. Then, clause 2 is as follows;

2. That, as up to the year 1913, the decks of the Empress boats were manned by white seamen. and in as much as the deck service is an important and responsible branch of the work of these boats, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company be requested to replace with Canadian seamen the orientals now so employed, and that this change be made at the company's earliest opportunity.

One could say possibly that I have not crossed every "t" and dotted every "i,"

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Reid

because I state in my resolution that this company has defied the order of parliament. It was pointed out to me that an order of parliament means an order of the House of Commons and of the Senate, and that this was merely a request by the House of Commons. But surely, Mr. Speaker, a request by the House of Commons is tantamount to an order, or at least should be.

I shall attempt to point out to hon. members the seriousness of the matter. This is not the first time the Canadian Pacific Railway Company has defied orders. I might refer hon. members to an instance not so long ago where orders were given by the board of railway commissioners, and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company refused to obey them. If there is anything in these days of unrest likely to create more disorder, it is the fact that we have in Canada an institution which, it would seem, is above the law of the land and which replies, irrespective of what it may be asked, "We are not going to carry out your wishes."

If the request had been made without first having a full inquiry and without taking time to go into every aspect of the matter, and if we had not tried to find out the numbers who could work on the boats in preference to orientals, and all facts in connection with every matter affecting the granting of large sums of money, I would say that perhaps there might be some excuse for allowing the company consideration. But the matter was considered fully by the committee. Every argument that could be advanced by the company's representatives was brought forward on that occasion. But as has already been pointed out, after due deliberation the committee appointed by the house brought in a report which was unanimously adopted and which has not been carried out by the railway company.

Although I have discussed the matter on many occasions, there are some salient points that I should like to bring before the members of this house. I am going first to touch briefly on the history of the subsidies. That history started away back in 18S9, when the imperial government made a grant of $300,000 for the operation of a route from Halifax across Canada and from Vancouver to the orient; it was known as the all-red route. I wish the originators of that project could see what has happened now, because that red route has now taken on a yellow tinge, for the majority of employees of the ships are from oriental countries and we designate them, not in a derogatory sense, as the "yellow" race. The Canadian government of that time was asked to contribute $75,000, and that

grant was continued for ten years. In 1914 the agreement was suspended, but in 1916 the company made an appeal for assistance and it was granted. But this fact should now be noted,- that from 1921 to 1930 the company did not receive one five-cent piece by way of subsidy from the treasury of this country, and when asked in committee how they could carry on without obtaining large sums of money, well, they thought perhaps trade was a little better, et cetera, but no satisfactory answer to that question was given. In 1931 they appealed to the government and obtained in that year almost a million dollars by way of subsidy. Later the amoimt was reduced, and last year they obtained a total of $749,000 for twenty-three round trips.

I suppose it is only natural that notice is not taken of many statements, wise and otherwise, made in committee, but I should like members of this house to give serious attention to certain statements made by the company's chief expert who appeared and gave evidence under oath before that committee, a man named Captain Aikman, R.N., who at one time was in the Royal Naval Reserve and is still attached, I believe, to the naval forces of Great Britain. He was asked in that committee, if he were compelled to pay the same wages to Chinamen and to Canadians or Britishers whom would he employ, and without hesitation he stated "Chinamen." He stated also that they were better sailors. He, a British Royal Naval Reserve officer with seemingly no great pride of nationality, admitted under oath that if he had to employ men of one of these races and pay them the same wages he would employ orientals. It is no wonder that I said to him, "Well, you had better advise the British admiralty that there are better seamen in China than in the British navy," when that was the argument he made before the committee. He was asked, would he hire Canadians if they were available, and he made no answer to that question. He was also asked, if he were given lists of Canadians would he employ them? There was no answer to that. The reason those questions were asked was that the company's representatives had stated under oath that there were no seamen available in any of the Pacific ports and therefore they must of necessity hire orientals or Chinamen from Hong Kong. Evidence was produced that there were at least 1,100 men of all classes, whose names and addresses were given, available for this employment, but apparently, to judge from Captain Aikman's evidence, it was the settled or avowed policy of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company not to employ Canadians.

Pacific Coast Shipping-Mr. Reid

To me this is extremely serious, as also is the witness's statement that he preferred Chinamen to our own people.

During the parliamentary recess I went into the question of the numbers of men who are or could be available if the Canadian Pacific Railway Company were disposed to employ our own nationals. I have before me the latest figures supplied by the provincial relief department of British Columbia. There are actually registered at the moment close to 300 men who class their occupation as "seaman" in one capacity or another, and on the Pacific coast there are also some four to five hundred men who are employed for the summer season but who are not listed, I believe, in the relief figures I have given. I mention this to disprove the statement made on behalf of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company that there are no men available.

Topic:   PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PROPOSED CESSATION OF SUBSIDY TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   PACIFIC PENDING REPLACEMENT OF ORIENTALS BY WHITE SEAMEN
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February 3, 1937