June 18, 1936

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

MORNING AND SATURDAY SITTINGS


On the order for. motions:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members may have noticed that in the votes and proceedings of yesterday I gave notice of the following motion: -

That on Friday, the 19th instant, on Saturday, the 20th instant, and every sitting day and Saturday thereafter until the end of the session, the house shall meet at eleven o'clock in the morning, and that in addition to the usual intermission at six o'clock p.m., there shall be an intermission every day from one to three o'clock p.m., and the order of business and procedure shall be the same on Saturday as on Friday.

I handed this notice to the clerk last evening, having had a word with the chief whip who in the interval had seen the whips of the other parties. I understand that the motion expresses the general view of hon. members. Such being the case, I would ask for unanimous consent for the adoption of the motion so that the order of procedure for tomorrow and Saturday may immediately be known.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING AND SATURDAY SITTINGS
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CCF

Abraham Albert Heaps

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. A. A. HEAPS (Winnipeg North):

Mr Speaker, before the motion is put I should like to say a word or two with regard to the sittings of the house. For some time I have been thinking about this matter and it has occurred to me that we might change the hours during which the house sits. In Great Britain the house sits continuously from four o'clock on, and I was wondering if the Prime Minister or the government would consent to having a committee appointed next session to study this question and perhaps any rules which need revision. H the house would

sit continuously from two o'clock until seven,, it would mean five hours a day or twenty-five hours a week as against the twenty-seven hours a week that we now sit. I think we would actually get through our work more expeditiously than we do by sitting from three o'clock to six, and from eight o'clock to eleven.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING AND SATURDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I say to my hon. friend that the government will be pleased to consider the suggestion he has made. If when the house resumes at a subsequent session it is the wish -of hon. members that a committee be appointed to consider this and allied matters, there will be every disposition on the part of the government to grant the request.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING AND SATURDAY SITTINGS
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Motion agreed to.


FREE FOREIGN TRADE ZONES


On the order: First reading of Senate Bills-Bill No. 108 (Letter E2 of the Senate), intituled: "An Act to enable the establishment, operation and maintenance of free foreign trade zones."


REC

Henry Herbert Stevens

Reconstruction

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Kootenay East):

I understand that the hon. member who was to move this 'bill, or rather to sponsor it, is not here. I should be glad to move the first reading of it.

Topic:   FREE FOREIGN TRADE ZONES
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Mr. Stevens moves that Bill No. 108, to enable the establishment, operation and maintenance of free foreign trade zones, be read the first time.

Topic:   FREE FOREIGN TRADE ZONES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Explain.

Topic:   FREE FOREIGN TRADE ZONES
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REC

Henry Herbert Stevens

Reconstruction

Mr. STEVENS:

The bill, as will be seen, originated in the senate. It provides for the establishment, operation and maintenance of free foreign trade zones, or what is known as the free port zone. It is not proper at this time to go into any lengthy explanation, but briefly it provides merely for the issuing by the government of a licence for -the establishment of such a free port zone in any port in Canada. The bill does not come into operation except on proclamation, nor does it involve in any sense a charge upon the treasury.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   FREE FOREIGN TRADE ZONES
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


STANDING COMMITTEES

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. How many of the select standing committees of the House of Commons have met this session and discussed matters within their jurisdiction?

Questions

2. How many of the said committees have not functioned this session?

3. What are the names of such committees, and the reason in each case?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STANDING COMMITTEES
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LIB

Mr. MACKENZIE KING: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

1. Ten.

2. Three.

3. Marine and fisheries, mines, forests and waters, and public accounts. No matters referred to them.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STANDING COMMITTEES
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PORT CREDIT, ONT., HARBOUR IMPROVEMENT

CON

Mr. GRAYDON:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was the property at the mouth of the Credit river, Peel county, Ontario, purchased for harbour improvement purposes, and, if so, when ?

2. What sums of money have been spent in each succeeding year since the date of the said purchase, for dredging and other purposes in the harbour at Port Credit?

3. What amount was voted by the last government for harbour improvements at Port Credit in the year 1935?

4. Is any work on the said harbour improvements contemplated in the year 1936?

5. If so, how much money will be spent on the said improvements this year?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PORT CREDIT, ONT., HARBOUR IMPROVEMENT
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June 18, 1936