June 17, 1936

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT


First report of the joint committee of both houses on the printing of parliament.-Mr. MacLean (Prince).


INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS


Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford) moved that the recommendations contained in the third report of the standing committee on industrial and international relations, presented to the house on Monday, June 15, be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


WHEAT AND OTHER GRAINS


Hon. W. D. EULER (Minister of Trade and Commerce) moved that the second and final report of the special committee on the marketing of wheat and other grains, presented on Thursday, June 11, be concurred in.


CON

Ernest Edward Perley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. E. E. PERLEY (Qu'Appelle):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say a word before the

TMr. Bennett.]

report presented by the special committee is concurred in, because the producers of western Canada may regard it as very brief. I think it is only fair to say to the public and to hon. members of this house who were not members of the committee that the committee were of the unanimous opinion that nothing should be done to injure or jeopardize the sale of our wheat and that nothing should be done to handicap the board in its selling operations. The evidence was somewhat confusing, but once the majority of the committee had decided that a royal commission should be set up to review the evidence taken and to carry on further investigation, it was felt that no useful purpose could be served by further discussion or by going into more detail with respect to the evidence.

It is true the report is brief. One paragraph in particular might be termed a majority and minority opinion. It states that there was no conclusive evidence that the board had protected1 speculative shorts, and it states also that the committee found no conclusive evidence on that point. I think this brief explanation in due to the public and I do not believe any useful purpose can be served by further reviewing the evidence. With this explanation, I am prepared to concur in the report.

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LIB

Harry Leader

Liberal

Mr. HARRY LEADER (Portage la Prairie):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say a word or two, having been a member of the committee appointed to investigate this particular question. I am glad that we brought in a unanimous report and that a further investigation is to be undertaken to find the best method of marketing our grain. May I take this opportunity to present a resolution passed by one of the farmer organizations in my constituency. It is typical of others that I have received. I received this particular one some months ago and have taken up the matter with the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Euler). The resolution reads:

That whereas there being a guaranteed minimum price established for wheat, and no protection afforded coarse grainB, we are of the opinion that unless there is a radical change in the coarse grain situation before seeding time 1936, there will be a very large increase in the acreage seeded to wheat.

Therefore we the shareholders of this association strongly urge that the principles contained in section 14 of the Canadian Wheat Board Act be applied by which coarse grains may be brought under the operation of the Canadian wheat board.

A. W. Hawker,

Secretary,

Oakville Elevator Association.

If I may be allowed a moment or two, I should like to say a word with regard to the

Wheal and Other Grains

grain situation. The people in the district from ivhich I come and throughout the province of Manitoba realize the danger of overproduction in wheat and have been switching gradually to the growing of barley. The barley crop in western Canada is becoming increasingly important. If we could produce more barley and less wheat, I think all hon. members will agree that it would be in the interests not only of the farmers but of the whole of Canada. We can produce a splendid quality of barley in western Canada; all we require is a market for this grain. There has been considerable investigation with regard to the finding of markets for our barley. During recent years the government of Manitoba has endeavoured to find 'better markets for barley. Doctor Grant was appointed in 1929 to investigate the possibilities in this regard.

The British brewers made a survey of Canada with regard to the quality of barley grown here. They found that our barley was of a superior grade and could be used for malting purposes, but they also found that the best grades were being used by the Canadian and American brewers. They were getting only the poorer grades. They complained that the malting barley they were getting from the terminal elevators in Canada was mixed and unsuitable for malting purposes. They found that the 3 C.W. barley contained many weed seeds and frosted grains and other foreign matter which made it useless as a malting barley. The eastern Canadian farmers have declared that our 3 C.W. barley contains too many weed seeds. They do not want to buy this barley even for the purpose of hog feed. I should like to read an extract from an editorial which appeared in the Manitoba Tribune, as follows:

British maltsters are not the only ones to complain. Speaking to the national barley committee this week in Toronto, Professor R. G. Knox of the Guelph agricultural college, said that if western growers wanted a better eastern market they would have to send out a product free from weed seeds. "The great prevalence of weed seeds in western barley," he said, "was a serious handicap to its sale to Ontario hog raisers as feed.

What we want is another grade of barley, suitable for malting purposes, which will be stored in special bins in the terminal elevators where it will be available to foreign buyers and be guaranteed as suitable for malting purposes.

I should like to place on record a resolution passed by the Portage local of the United Farmers of Manitoba. I shall hurry with this, sir, as I know you do not expect any extended remarks at this time. It reads:

Be it resolved whereas the descriptions and definitions of "statutory grades" of barley are reproduced in accordance with schedule one of the new Canada Grain Act on grades of barley, whereas the act reads "number three extra six row barley shall weigh 48 pounds and equal in value for malting purposes to

O.A.C. '21," we find that many samples of malting varieties going forward for inspection only grade three C.W. on account of being under the weight of 48 pounds and whereas many cars being inspected that weigh 46 pounds to 47 pounds are graded three C.W. barley or lower according to weight, it is resolved at this meeting that a new grade of six row barley be established for malting barley that weighs between 46 and 48 pounds. We suggest a grade of 4 extra six row barley. Due to the fact that the existing spreads between three C.W. barley of malting variety and three extra six row barley of malting variety have been too wide during the past two years, running from 2 to 35 cents per bushel, with only one pound difference in the weight, it is therefore apparent that the malting companies have derived considerable values on malting barley under the weight of 48 pounds.

Respectfully submitted to your government.

It is a well known fact that barley weighing less than 48 pounds to the bushel is being used by Canadian maltsters. Barley weighing 47 pounds is fit for the maltsters and is being used by Canadian maltsters at the present time, but simply because our regulations do not allow barley weighing less than 48 pounds to the bushel to be classed as six-row, we are losing a special market which would be available. This resolution therefore asks the government to give us a new grade between six-row and 3 C.W., weighing less than 48 pounds and guaranteeing a purer quality for the buyers overseas. I suggest that this barley be special binned on reaching the terminal elevators and not mixed with foreign matter as I have indicated in my remarks. I have taken the question up with the Minister of Trade and Commerce and he in turn has taken it up with the head of the grain commission, who has pointed out that the grain act will be completely overhauled next year when this matter will be taken into consideration. There is nothing to prevent the grain board from giving us the benefit of this new grade in order to take care of the 1936 crop, and for that reason I am on my feet, urging the government to see that this is undertaken.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Big-gar):

Representing as I do a large grain

producing constituency in western Canada, I wish to concur in the remarks just made by the preceding speakers, the hon. member for Qu'Appelle (Mr. Perley) and the hon. member for Portage la Prairie (Mr. Leader),

Questions

but particularly would I impress upon the government the fact that in western Canada there is a desire that the government shall make an unqualified pronouncement in favour of continuing a wheat board, and setting an adequate price for wheat and other grains. That is the issue which is engaging the minds of the producers of western Canada at the present time, and I hope this will be done at no far distant date.

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Motion agreed to.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


MISSION TO DISCUSS AND PROMOTE TRADE RELATIONS

LIB

Mr. BOULANGER:

Liberal

1. Will the Department of Trade and Commerce shortly send a commercial mission abroad, as intimated to the house by the minister on June 8, instant?

2. What are the names and the duties of the individuals who will take part in this mission ?

3. What countries will he visited?

4. On broad lines, what will be the objects of this mission?

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Subtopic:   MISSION TO DISCUSS AND PROMOTE TRADE RELATIONS
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LIB

Mr. EULER: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. The director of the commercial intelligence service and the Minister of Trade and Commerce.

3. Great Britain and continental countries which cannot yet be definitely named.

4. To discuss and promote trade relations.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MISSION TO DISCUSS AND PROMOTE TRADE RELATIONS
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' QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS

BROADVIEW, SASK., POST OFFICE

CON

Mr. PERLEY (Qu'Appelle):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How much rental has the federal government paid for the post office building at Broadview, Saskatchewan, since the first of November last to date?

2. How much has been paid by the government for the caretaking and heating of the new post office at Broadview, since the first of November last to date?

3. Did the government call for tenders for the installing of equipment in connection with the said post office?

4. If so, on what date were tenders called?

5. Who received the' contract and for what amount?

Topic:   ' QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   BROADVIEW, SASK., POST OFFICE
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Return tabled herewith.

Topic:   ' QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   BROADVIEW, SASK., POST OFFICE
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June 17, 1936