April 29, 1936

PRIVILEGE-MR. CHURCH

CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I regret to rise to a question of privilege. I wish to refer to a few short words in a long editorial reflecting on me, on this subject, in the Ottawa Journal of Saturday, April 25, in which it says, referring to my remarks in this house on Wednesday, April 22, "The member for Broadview goes places when he gets on his feet." It says I saw New York slums from the Grand Central station. Times square, the Waldorf-Astoria and Fifth avenue. I did not-nor those here from an Ottawa golf club. There was no "if" about it. I saw them in New York with the late Doctor Hastings, the great medical health officer. I only referred to those across the Ottawa river as one concrete case in Canada. I saw these in detail the day before I introduced the housing motion of last year, and again on July 3 and 4, 1935. According to citation 157 of Beauchesne I deem these errors an interference with and reflection upon a private member. The editor says I spoke without that "profound preliminary thought that is supposed to be an attribute of statesmanship." I did not. I devoted fifteen years of thought with the late Doctor Hastings to secure slum clearance and housing, and a modern health department in all its forms. He wishes I had come closer to the facts and had a little more sympathy and understanding. When I need these I will not go to this editor for such aid. I know the facts. While I will always respect and admire the proprietor of this paper, its editor "understands everything and knows nothing" of slum conditions as I have seen them.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. CHURCH
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DAIRY INDUSTRY ACT


Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 56, to amend the Dairy Industry Act.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   DAIRY INDUSTRY ACT
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

This is a short amendment having to do with the different sizes

of prints in which butter can be made up for sale. I understand that in British Columbia they are in the habit of using a three pound print, while in other provinces they usually use one or two. The law now confines us to a maximum of two, and the intention is to extend it to permit the use of any multiple of one.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   DAIRY INDUSTRY ACT
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION

CCF

Mr. MacNEIL:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. How many persons have been dismissed trom the staff of the Vancouver harbour commission since October 23, 1935?

2. How many of those dismissed during this period were ex-service men?

3. How many persons have been appointed to the staff of the Vancouver harbour commission since October 23, 1935?

4. How many of those appointed during this period were ex-service men?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Marine; Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The following information supplied by the Vancouver harbour commissioners:

1. Twenty-seven.

2. Six.

3. Fifteen.

4. Three.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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LIB

Mr. McLARTY:

Liberal

1. How many persons have been dismissed trom the staff of the Vancouver harbour commission during the period commencing August 7, 1930, and ending October 23, 1935 f

2; How many of those dismissed during that period were ex-service men?

3. How many persons were appointed to the staff of the Vancouver harbour commission during the said period?

4. How many of those appointed during the said period were ex-service men?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Marine; Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The following information supplied by the Vancouver harbour commissioners:

1. Seventy-six.

2. Twenty-two.

3. One hundred and thirty-two.

4. Forty-six.

(Note: During this period mentioned the commissioners assumed operation of Lapointe pier, including staff of that pier; also Second Narrows bridge and also operated elevator No. 2 for one year).

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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DELORIMIER POSTAL STATION, MONTREAL

LIB

Mr. DESLAURIERS:

Liberal

1. What is the name and address of the owner of the building situate at 4574 Papineau

Questions

street, Montreal, occupied by the Delorimier postal station?

2. Wliat is the municipal valuation of this building?

3. What is the monthly and yearly rental for that portion of the building occupied for postal purposes?

i. What amount has the government expended on said building, for improvements, repairs and maintenance from 1930 inclusive to 1936? . ,

5. What is the floor space occupied by the

post office? .

6. When does the lease of the building

expire ? ,

7. During the depression was any reduction made in the rental?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DELORIMIER POSTAL STATION, MONTREAL
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LIB

Mr. ELLIOTT (Middlesex): (Postmaster General)

Liberal

1. J. 0. Malo, 1856 De LaSalle ave., Montreal, P.Q.

2. Land, $4,000; building, $16,000; total,

3. (a) $300; (b) $3,600.

4. From date building rented May, 1, 1931, to January 31, 1936. Minor repairs and improvements, $602.03 for four years and nine months. (Large improvements and repairs made by owner). Caretaking, heating, lighting, power and water, $4,976.70 for four years and nine months.

5. 4,650 square feet.

6. May 1, 1937.

7. On expiration of lease May 1, 1936, the rental reduced to $3,000 per annum.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DELORIMIER POSTAL STATION, MONTREAL
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ALLEGED SHORTAGE OP POTATOES

REC

Mr. STEVENS:

Reconstruction

1. Has the attention of the government been drawn to a widely circulated press dispatch stating that there was a shortage of potatoes in Canada?

2. Is the government aware that such a statement was unwarranted by the facts?

3. What steps, if any, have been taken to correct the false impression made by this dispatch?

4. Is the government aware that retail prices of potatoes have been advanced to an unwarranted extent in many instances as a result of the dispatch referred to in question No. 1?

5. Has any inquiry been instituted to ascertain who was responsible for the dispatch, and as to whether or not holders of storage supplies of potatoes were implicated in circulating the information for the purpose of increasing prices?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED SHORTAGE OP POTATOES
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. No. On the contrary, reliable information shows that the crop and marketing position warranted a sharp price advance in potatoes. Commercial storage holdings in Canada at April 1st totalled only 48,152 tons against 246,673 tons in 1935. New York and

Boston wholesale prices had taken a sharp rise and attracted shipments from the maritime provinces which otherwise would have been available to demand in central Canada. The following are extracts from the New York Packer, a prominent trade journal:-

"New York, April 10-Maine growers still fortunate enough to own potatoes were this week feeling that they, for the first time in recent years, were in control of the market situation, and started naming their own prices. Varying factors entered into this bullish outlook, the foremost being that practically all remaining supplies were in their hands, the second being the comparatively small amount of potatoes which still remain to be shipped, and the third and not the least important being the continued heavy demand from widely scattered regions which in former years at this period would be drawing stock from producing districts closer to home. .

"New York, April 17-The potato market ruled firm to slightly stronger here this week with supplies clearing readily at prices higher than last week's. The present bullish tone continued in the shipping sections, particularly in Maine, and even many conservative distributors were gradually losing their bearish attitude.

In the Maine sections growers were reluctant to haul their stocks even at the $3 per barrel figure and remained firm in their conviction that the peak price had not been reached. . .

One cargo arriving by boat, totalling around 90 cars, reached the market during mid-week and this stock cleaned up rapidly, opening prices of $2.15 being speedily advanced to S2.25 per 100-lb bag, all sales f.o.b. Port Newark. . .

Another boat arrived carrying approximately 80 cars of Prince Edward Island potatoes and these also cleaned up speedily at attractive prices ranging from $2.50 to $2.60 per 90-pound bag, depending on size. . . .

Taking the entire potato market as a whole the present tone is one of extreme strength, and while there continues to be an undercurrent of uneasiness over the sudden rise in prices, the willingness displayed by buyers at all important marketing centres to absorb receipts at the higher levels seemed to indicate that values at the moment were fairly sound."

"New York, April 24-The potato market continued firm to slightly stronger this week both locally and in the shipping sections of the country. While price advances have been spotty there has been no instance of weaknesses since the recent upward surge began a few weeks ago, and the steadiness of the

Questions

advance both at country points and in the consuming centres appeared to sustain the bullish attitude taken by the majority of growers in Maine. . . .

While the main portion of the 200 oars which have been moving daily from Maine were destined for eastern markets, some middle western buyers were still taking on more than their customary purchases from that area for this late period of the season. This condition was partly brought about by high prices of Idaho offerings, as well as the disappointing quality and size shown by the early new stock from Florida in the opinion of many in trade circles. ..."

3, 4, and 5-Answered by No. 2.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED SHORTAGE OP POTATOES
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VIMT RIDGE MEMORIAL

April 29, 1936