March 5, 1936

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE

LIB

Mr. REID:

Liberal

1. Is any financial assistance provided by the dominion government to the sons and daughters of officials or officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for high school or any other form of education?

2. If so, what sums of money were provided by the government for such purposes and to what persons was this money paid during the calendar years 1932 to 1935?

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Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
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LIB

Mr. LAPOINTE (Quebec East): (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. No.

(a) Special training for sub-constables in clerical duties in connection with police work has been given at Regina, Saskatchewan, since June, 1934, and out of a total of 43 who have received this special training, ten have been sons of members of the force.

(b) In addition to the above, five other members of the force (one of whom is the son of an officer, Constable J. MacBrien) are being given courses in law at five different universities of Canada. The only financial assistance given is an allowance of 50 cents per diem each.

(b) (i) There is need of having members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, who are experienced in police duties, trained in law. This is being done at Scotland Yard through the employment of special officers in the Criminal Investigation Branch and at the Bureau of Investigation. Department of Justice, Washington, U.S.A. In the latter case, no candidate is accepted for service unless he is a graduate in law or is a chartered accountant.

(c) No daughters of officials or officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police have

Questions

been given financial assistance for high school or any other form of education.

2. Answered by No. 1.

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Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
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HALLONQUIST, SASK., POSTMASTER

CCF

Mr. COLDWELL:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What is the annual salary of the postmaster at Hallonquist, Saskatchewan?

2. What commission was paid from sale of postage stamps, money orders, postal notes, etc., for the past fiscal year?

3. What allowance is made for carrying the mail between the post office and the station?

4. How is the latter amount arrived at?

5. Is the basis the same in all cases?

6. If not, what other basis is used?

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Subtopic:   HALLONQUIST, SASK., POSTMASTER
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LIB

FISH CULTURE

IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

What is the total amount spent year by year for the last fifteen years on fish cultural work in (a) Canada; (b) British Columbia?

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Subtopic:   FISH CULTURE
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LIB
CON

Herbert Earl Wilton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. H. E. WILTON (Hamilton West):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to inquire of the Minister of Pensions and National Health (Mr. Power) whether there is any possibility of the vetcraft shop which was recently closed at Hamilton being reopened.

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Subtopic:   FISH CULTURE
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LIB

Charles Gavan Power (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Liberal

Hon. C. G. POWER (Minister of Pensions and National Health):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member was good enough to give me notice of his question. In reply I would say that the vetcraft shop was closed on March 1, and will not be reopened. Within a few months the district office of the department will be removed to the new government building and there is no accommodation in that building for a vetcraft shop. These shops were started originally for the purpose of training men in civilian occupations. It was anticipated that the training given would enable partially disabled ex-soldiers to obtain ordinary employment. However, it has been found during recent years that many of those who obtained employment in these shops did not leave. As there has not been any substantial change in the personnel for some time, it would appear that the object for which these shops were originally instituted has not been achieved. There were some eighteen men employed in the shop at Hamilton, receiving something 'like thirty-five cents per hour, the prevailing rate of wages. Each one of these men cost the country approximately $33 to $35 per month, and it has been felt that such men were receiving a preference over other returned soldiers. The men employed in any shop which may be closed will fall into the same category as other ex-soldiers. If they are pensioners drawing small pensions they will be entitled to relief.

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Subtopic:   FISH CULTURE
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CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT PROPOSED APPROVAL SUBJECT TO LEGISLATION MAKING PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE


The house resumed from Wednesday, March 4, consideration of the motion of Mr. Mackenzie King: That it is expedient that parliament do approve of the trade agreement entered into at Washington on the 15th day of November, 1935, between His Majesty's government in the Dominion of Canada and the government of the United States of America, and that this house do approve of the same, subject to the legislation required in order to give effect to the provisions thereof.


LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. J. A. BRADETTE (Cochrane):

Yesterday afternoon when discussing this resolution I expressed the sentiments of the people I

MARCH 5, 1936 7S9

Canada-U. S. Trade Agreement

have the honour to represent. I said that during the last election all parties in Canada were perfectly satisfied that the then administration had been trying to effect an agreement with the United States and also that the Liberal party, if it were returned to power, would do its very best to bring about an agreement such as the one now under consideration. I said further that a good many sections of the population were astonished at the attitude taken by the present leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett). I made that statement for this reason. I well remember that during the last session the then Minister of Finance made a statement in the house to the effect that the great Conservative party had always been in favour of reciprocity or of freer trade with the United States. I have received several communications from people in my own constituency, supporters of the Conservative party, for whose opinions I have always had the greatest respect, expressing their failure to understand the attitude of the leader of the opposition to this particular question.

Yesterday I said that in our part of Canada the people were absolutely impartial so far as the tariff was concerned, but I added that any tariff that raised an artificial barrier in the way of exports from a country such as Canada, which is always on an exporting basis, would certainly put a burden on the shoulders of the people I represent; and that applies to every section of northern Ontario. I also mentioned, so as to be fair, the benefits enjoyed by the newsprint industry. I listened attentively to the remarks of the hon. member for Lanark (Mr. Thompson), particularly when he said that he was content to deal with nations within the British empire, and I pointed out to the hon. gentleman that it was not possible to sell to Great Britain a single pound of the product of the newsprint industry. The natural, the only market we have now or have ever had in the past is the United States.

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Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT PROPOSED APPROVAL SUBJECT TO LEGISLATION MAKING PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The hon. gentleman is

not correct. The Standard and the Express are very large users of Canadian newsprint.

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Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT PROPOSED APPROVAL SUBJECT TO LEGISLATION MAKING PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

I did not quite hear

what the right hon. gentleman said.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The hon. gentleman is

inadvertently incorrect. The Daily Standard and the Daily Express of London, England, are both printed on Canadian newsprint.

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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Well, no one will deny that the great bulk of the product goes to the United States. There was a time when we believed that we were supreme in that industry, by reason of our access and close

proximity to the American market; but anyone who has studied the industry will find that in the last five years we have been faced with keen competition from the Scandinavian countries and from Germany. Sweden is advancing every year with a greater and greater average of production to compete with our Canadian newsprint. One realizes, in this connection, the great change that has taken place through the development of transportation, in the use of motor vehicles and in other ways, throughout the civilized world, so that so far as distance is concerned the world is really getting smaller and smaller; the old channels of trade, which were tedious and involved delays, no longer exist. These are facts to be remembered.

In our section we are primary producers and our surplus must necessarily find its way to the world's markets. I will not repeat what I said yesterday with regard to the tariff on fruit and vegetables. It is sufficient to say that in our part of the country we have been greatly penalized by the application of the so-called seasonal tariff, and I fervently hope that the Department of National Revenue will take steps to ensure that our people in that section will be able to buy these necessities at reasonable prices. I hope they will get fair treatment.

I have no doubt that every member has been lobbied with regard to Canadian magazines and periodicals, and again the bogey has been raised, that unless we erect artificial barriers to keep out such publications from other countries our Canadian mentality will be impaired. Any such statement is obviously far-fetched. There is one thing I implicitly believe in and that is the importance of education and the mental development of the people, and I submit that no obstacle should be placed in the way of this development. For a number of years prior to the imposition of duties on United States and other foreign publications I used to subscribe to the Literary Digest, a non-partisan publication which gives an unbiased view of all questions pertaining not only to the United States but to the world at large. After the duties were imposed however I found that I had not the means of securing that and other magazines. I am quite prepared to patronize Canadian magazines and periodicals; they are well written and well worth reading. But surely our loyalty to Canadian principles and ideals does not involve the audacity of prohibiting the people from reading American publications. I do agree that certain types of United States newspapers which are antagonistic to the British empire, and certain fiction magazines, should be

Canada-U. S. Trade Agreement

absolutely prohibited; but those that treat of scientific matters, those that discuss international questions, should be allowed access to Canada. Surely our Canadian magazine publishers must have a certain market in the United States in respect of which there could be reciprocal literary exchanges. At any rate, personally I will not put any restrictions on learning and intellectual development.

I know that the hon. member for Kootenay East (Mr. Stevens) will give me credit for sincerity when I compliment him on what he said the other day, and I believe he was but saying what the majority of Canadians think when they take the trouble to study the problem with which we are dealing at the present time. It is always very easy, in discussing a matter such as this, to raise bogies to scare the people, ignoring the fact that we are dealing with economic and commercial problems, for the purpose of making nationalistic and political capital. We have suffered from that sort of thing in the past. Experience has shown that freer trade between Canada and the United States, to the extent that it has been tried, has been beneficial to both countries. It is during such periods that we have enjoyed our largest share of prosperity. I do not go so far as to say that it is a formula for the solution of all our problems; our problems are not so easily solved. But inasmuch as we are an exporting country, I regard it as one of the best means of solving to a large extent our present unemployment problem.

I should like to quote two or three sentences from the speech of the hon. member for East Kootenay. At page 724 he is reported as having said:

Let us look for a moment at the agreement. The agreement is, as I have said, a step or a gesture in the right direction.

This is absolutely true; no one even on the government side will dare to say that this agreement is perfect. It would not need to be amended from day to day or month to month, though perhaps it would from year to year. Later on at page 725 the hon. member has this to say:

There are bound to be some cases where there appears to be an injury, but what I would suggest is that we wait for a time and see whether these imagined injuries are real.

I have no doubt that there is no person on this side of the house who would like to see any of our industries in rural sections of the country markedly injured by the present treaty with the United States. The same applies to all our social and economic and industrial and farm activities. At the

same time, as was stated by the hon. member for Kootenay East, there is no doubt that in some sections a certain amount of sacrifice must be made for the benefit of the whole. Later on the hon. member says:

In the first place I want to say that this treaty is good because the motive and intention behind it are good, and I think it should be supported because the motive and intention are good. There is a spirit of good will in the treaty which ought to be and I am sure is welcomed by both countries.

I hold no brief and have no right to speak for the Conservative party, but it will be a wonderful gesture at this time if the grand old Conservative party will see their way to support the treaty, will recognize the good that is in it, and will help the government in all necessary amendments.

I am very glad of this situation, Mr. Speaker, that for the next four or five years we may not have to hold an election in this country. I mention that point because it means that for four or five years at least there are not going to be raised the great questions with which we were confronted in the past when dealing with reciprocity pacts. We are going to apply the principle of this treaty-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT PROPOSED APPROVAL SUBJECT TO LEGISLATION MAKING PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE
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LIB

Walter Edward Foster (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I regret to inform the

hon. member that his time has expired.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT PROPOSED APPROVAL SUBJECT TO LEGISLATION MAKING PROVISIONS EFFECTIVE
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

If you will allow me,

sir, I will make one more observation. I think I have lost about eight minutes, but I accept at once the ruling of the chair. It is certain that in this question there are forces, stronger than politics or mere national selfishness and premeditated misrepresentation, which will keep alive the determination of the two nations to engage in profitable trade.

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March 5, 1936