February 11, 1936

MAIN ESTIMATES, 1936-37


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting estimates for the financial year ending March 31, 1937. was presented by Hon. Charles A. Dunning (Minister of Finance), and read by Mr. Speaker to the house.


CRIMINAL CODE

INQUIRY AS TO PROVISION RESPECTING UNLAWFUL ASSOCIATIONS


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Abraham Albert Heaps

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. A. A. HEAPS (Winnipeg North):

Will the Minister of Justice say whether it is the intention of the government at this session to bring in legislation with regard to the repeal of section 98 of the criminal code?

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROVISION RESPECTING UNLAWFUL ASSOCIATIONS
Permalink
LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice):

There will certainly be some legislation with respect to that section.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROVISION RESPECTING UNLAWFUL ASSOCIATIONS
Permalink

GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed from Monday, February 10. consideration of the motion of Mr. A. G. Slaght for an address to His Excellency [he Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

At the conclusion of his

long address yesterday, my right hon. friend the leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) said that he would like very much to offer to this side of the house his helpful cooperation in the difficult task with which governments of the present day are confronted. I think it was a fortunate thing for my right hon. friend that he made that statement at the end of his speech rather than at the beginning, because until the moment he made it there had been, I must say, nothing in his remarks which could have been construed as in any way helpful. They were, indeed, directly the opposite.

May I say to the leader of the opposition that he has had a long and exceptional parliamentary experience. He spoke very often from this side of the house of the great burden which rests on the shoulders of a prime minister, and the need on the part of the Prime Minister for the cooperation of hon. members in all parts of the house. I hope the right hon. gentleman will keep that in mind now that he is on the other

side of the house. I shall welcome very much, the government will welcome, what he is able to give in the way of cooperation in dealing with the great problems which we have before us for consideration from day to day in these times. I hope that my right hon. friend will not again find it necessary to spend his time wholly in criticism or sarcasm, or in remarks that for the most part are facetious and in no way constructive or helpful.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon.

friends opposite are groaning a bit, but may I ask them just how, in seeking to be "helpful", their leader began his discourse yesterday. The first thing he did was to say that no doubt, as Prime Minister, I should find considerable difficulty in having so large a following. It was very natural that he should make a remark of that kind. Heaven knows with a very much smaller following he had enough difficulty to cope with all the time he was in office. The following he has behind him at the present moment is eloquent of the results of difficulties and discussions which he had at different times with sopae of his colleagues and members of his party.

The leader of the opposition was at particular pains to try to tell this house what had taken place during the formation of the present government. I heard him say repeatedly, when he was on this side of the house, that matters which pertained to the cabinet, and to his own party, were their business and nobody else's, and that it might be just as well for other people to mind their own business. I give him back his own words at this time. May I say that I think it ill became him, knowing the problems that face any first minister in the formation of a cabinet, to seek, at the very beginning of a parliamentary session, to create prejudice, not only as between different members of a party, but as between different parts of the country, by an appeal to race such as he sought to make in the remarks he offered at that time.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Mr. Speaker, I must inform the right hon. gentleman that I made no such statement, and the effort he is now making to create the very situation to which he refers is entirely out of order. I read from the statement made by the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe).

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am not

referring to that remark at all. That is one of many remarks. I am referring to what my right hon. friend said about my colleague the

78 COMMONS

The Address-Mr. Mackenzie King

present Minister of Public Works (Mr. Cardin). He undertook to tell this house what he assumed had transpired in the formation of the present government.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

It is true.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My right hon. friend knows more, apparently, about the formation of the present government than its members do.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

It was not the formation of it. It was a circumstance in connection with the men who were offered positions in the government.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My right hon. friend knows the rules of the house, and if he can just keep still for a little while he will set a better example to his own following and the rest of the house than he is doing at the present time.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Mr. Speaker, no hon.

member of this house has the right to misrepresent another. My right hon. friend was misrepresenting what I said, and I claim the right to correct the misstatements made by the Prime Minister. That is a question of order which I have the right to bring to the attention of the chair.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink

February 11, 1936