June 27, 1935

RAILWAY COMMITTEE


First report of select standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines.-Mr. Harris. Questions


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


SASKATCHEWAN NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION

LIB

Mr. VALLANCE:

Liberal

1. Was George McDonald, C.A., a member of the firm of Clarkson, McDonald, Currie and Company while he was a member of the Saskatchewan Natural Resources Commission?

2. Was the firm of Clarkson, McDonald', Currie and Company acting as auditors for any department of the government during the period in which George C. McDonald, C.A., was a member of the Saskatchewan Natural Resources Commission, and, if so, what moneys, if any, were paid by the government to the said firm during that period?

3. Is the firm of Clarkson, McDonald, Currie and Company, of Montreal, associated with the firm of Clarkson, McDonald, Currie and Company of Toronto?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION
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CON

Mr. CAHAN: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. No information.

2. No.

3. No information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SASKATCHEWAN NATURAL RESOURCES COMMISSION
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DUTIES ON JAPANESE GOODS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

On May 20 my right hon. leader

asked a question of the Prime Minister with reference to trade between Japan and Canada. At that time the right hon. gentleman gave a detailed reply. Has he further information to lay before the house now with respect to the negotiations that have transpired?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DUTIES ON JAPANESE GOODS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

It is probable that before we

rise I may make a more extensive statement, but in the meantime discussions have taken place between the Japanese authorities and the Canadian authorities, and the minister at Tokyo has presented the position of Canada as clearly as it can possibly be placed. I sometimes think that some of our friends on this side of the Pacific fail to realize that during a period of forty years the dominion parliament, under all administrations, has taken positions at the instance of British Columbia which at the moment have been somewhat embarrassing.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DUTIES ON JAPANESE GOODS
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Hon. FERNAND RINFRET (St. James):

May I ask the Prime Minister whether the house is to sit on Monday, the first of July?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

It was our intention to sit unless

the house intimated its desire that we should not do so, but as I have explained we are entirely in the hands of the house. I was going to speak about the matter later in the day, but if it is the desire of the house that we should sit we will do so.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Has the Prime Minister considered the possibility of sitting on Saturday?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Yes. We have considered the question of sitting on Saturday, but in view of the fact that the evidence being given before the special committee has not been concluded I wondered whether it would be advancing matters very much by sitting on Saturday. That is the only consideration that has prevented me from giving notice to sit on Saturday. If it is thought that any useful purpose could be served by giving notice, I could give notice to-day or tomorrow; but it does not seem to me that we should make greater progress, especially in view of the fact that the other chamber has a very substantial volume of business to dispose of before they conclude with the bills now before them. That is my advice.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I agree that if the committee is not through, it would not be advisable to have a sitting on Saturday.

When the Prime Minister referred a moment ago to the relations with Japan, in the concluding part of his remarks he spoke of the attitude of all administrations toward Japan and said that he was afraid it had created an embarrassing situation. I do not wish to speak for his administration. With regard to previous administrations, I may say that our attitude when in office was, I think, distinctly of a character to preserve very harmonious relations with the orient, both Japan and China.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I may be out of order, but if the right hon. gentleman will read what I said he will find that it had reference to the attitude which this parliament and preceding parliaments had taken at the instance of British Columbia with respect to various matters in connection with Japan. I need hardly mention franchise matters and questions of that sort which have caused and do cause some embarrassments which have occurred under any governments that I have any knowledge of.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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RECIPROCITY NEGOTIATIONS

June 27, 1935