June 18, 1935

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

When I saw that I asked *myself at once whether twelve o'clock in the afternoon was good, because twelve o'clock is twelve o'clock noon and it is not twelve o'clock in the afternoon until one minute later. From twelve o'clock noon to the same hour the next day I think would be more accurate, but I understand there is some authority for saying twelve o'clock in the afternoon.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Permalink
IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Once more I should like to point out to the Prime Minister that when this matter was discussed before I think he gave the assurance that this question of the continuous nature of employment in lumbering and logging would be considered or dealt with under some other section of the act, possibly the regulations, but as the amendment reads now it will prohibit any action being taken under the regulations because it distinctly states what are to be the exemptions, and that would seem to preclude the possibility of any regulation bringing lumbering within the operations of the act.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I would not care to express a definite opinion on that point, but I do not

think there has been any curtailment of the powers of the commission to deal with the situation, by virtue of the changed language. Originally the language was "exclusive of the saw mill, planing mill and shingle mill industries" and in order that the question of the continuous character of their operations might be brought to the attention of the commission the senate has provided that they must be reasonably continuous in their operations, instead of treating them as industries that should be taken to be continuous. I do not think it changes the general sense of the provision as it left this house, but my opinion is no more valuable than that of the hon. gentleman in that regard.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Permalink
LIB

Robert McKenzie

Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE (Assiniboia):

When this bill was before the house in the first instance I brought up the question of part time employees in the coal mines, of whom I have a considerable number in my constituency. Certain amendments have been' made to section 7 to include part time employees, and I wonder just how those amendments will affect those coal miners who are employed as such for say twenty weeks in the year, and who for the rest of the time work on farms or at other occupations. Will they be included under this bill?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I would not care to venture a definite opinion about a matter of that sort. The language of the section I think makes it probable-I will go only that far-within the powers of the commission to deal with that matter. I would not care to anticipate an opinion and express a definite view on the point. When the hon. member for Assiniboia spoke I was just going to say that section 7 has not been changed so far as those powers are concerned. I should think the powers of the commission have not been abridged or lessened as compared to what they were when the bill left this chamber.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
Permalink

Motion agreed to, amendments read the second time and concurred in.


JUVENILE DELINQUENTS ACT


Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice) moved the second reading of Bill No. 106 to amend the Juvenile Delinquents Act. Motion agreed to, bill read the second time and the house went into committee thereon, Mr. Morand in the chair. On section 1-Summary trials.


LIB
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

The amendments proposed in this bill were requested by the various

Criminal Code Amendment

children's aid societies and similar organizations throughout Canada. They are not very important amendments, but the societies are anxious that they be carried into the act.

Topic:   JUVENILE DELINQUENTS ACT
Permalink

Section agreed to. Sections 2 and 3 agreed to. Title agreed to. Bill reported, read the third time and passed.


CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT


Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice) moved the second reading of Bill No. 107 to amend the criminal code. . Motion agreed to, bill read the second time and the house went into committee thereon, Mr. Morand in the chair. On section 1-Irrebuttable presumption.


LIB

Ross Wilfred Gray

Liberal

Mr. GRAY:

This clause apparently adds at the beginning of subsection 3 the words " it shall be an irrebuttable presumption." I think the house is always loath to add sections to the criminal code or to any statute providing for an " irrebuttable presumption," unless there is very good reason for doing so.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

This is another amendment requested by the children's aid societies of Canada. The words we propose to add to the section now in the criminal code are as follows:

It shall be an irrebuttable presumption in any prosecution under subsection 2 of this section, that the child was in danger of being or becoming immoral, its morals injuriously affected and its home rendered an unfit place for it to be in, upon proof that the person accused did in fact, in the home of such child, participate in adultery, in sexual immorality, in habitual drunkenness or in any other form of vice.

We have to prove, first, that the act was committed, and the irrebuttable presumption is that the child was thereby affected. Then there is this saving clause:

Provided that this subsection shall not apply in the case of two persons who are not married to each other but are living together as man and wife and reputed to be man and wife, and where the child so affected is the child of the two persons so living together.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Yes, it arises from the

complaint of children's aid societies about the section as it now stands, which is printed in the explanatory notes. That section is as follows:

In any prosecution under subsection 2 of this section, where the circumstances are such, as in the opinion of the court, to render it likely

And so on. That is the present section. The section would now read that in the event of immorality being proved there must be an irrebuttable presumption that the child was thereby affected.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
Permalink

Section agreed to. Section 2 agreed to. Bill reported, read the third time and passed.


LOAN OE $750,000,000 RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING MINISTER OP FINANCE TO RAISE FUNDS FOR REDEMPTION OF SECURITIES


Right Hon. Sir GEORGE PERLEY (for the Minister of Finance) moved the second reading of Bill No. 110, bo authorize the raising, by way of loan, of certain sums of money for the public service. Motion agreed to, bill read the second time, and the house went into committee thereon, Mr. Morand in the chair. On section 1-Short title.


June 18, 1935