June 14, 1935

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Just exactly what it

says.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

There is no imputation

of any kind.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I ask my right hon.

friend what he means by "what does it represent on the back of it"?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

From whom the brief

was received.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

My right hon. friend as

a leading member of the bar, as a former president of the Canadian Bar Association, as a gentleman who has the keeping of the discipline and the good name of this House of Commons in his hands

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Mr. Speaker, a question

of privilege does not involve the opportunity to cross-examine. The hon. member has made his statement and I have made mine.

M:r. RALSTON: Does my right hon.

friend think I am going to let it pass with the slipshod explanation he has made? I say that, my right hon. friend has made an imputation which will be regarded as an imputation by every lawyer in the country, and he knows it.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB
LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I said that I made no such imputation.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

Would my right hon. friend permit that statement from any other hon. member of this house and say that he made no imputation?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I say that I made no imputation such as the hon. member has suggested.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I am not withdrawing anything.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I ask the Prime Minister to explain what he meant by the words, "what does it represent on the back of it" if it was not an imputation?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Just what the words say.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

With regard to the question raised by the hon. member for Shelburne-Yarmouth (Mr. Ralston), I must say that I was in the house this afternoon when the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) made his statement and as a lawyer of some years standing at the bar I must confess frankly that I certainly did not take the imputation from the remarks of the Prime Minister which the hon. member for Shelburne-Yarmouth has. If I had taken any such imputation I certainly would have requested the Prime Minister to withdraw. The Prime Minister has stated that he made no imputation in the matter and naturally I must accept his statement. He has stated emphatically on more than one occasion since the question of privilege has been raised that he made no such imputation and that is the statement I am bound to accept.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I do ask if the words mean anything at all. If they do not contain an imputation why were they used? Those words were immediately followed by the words, "That is the question." What do the words mean if they do not mean to impute what I have just suggested? Can your honour as a distinguished lawyer conceive of any other meaning than the imputation to which I have just referred?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I must confess frankly that I do not take the imputation from the words that the hon. member has taken. I am sure he will agree with me that had I taken any such imputation it would have been my duty as Speaker to ask the Prime Minister to withdraw it. But I took no such imputation.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. RALSTON
Permalink

June 14, 1935