June 6, 1935

CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

Return tabled herewith.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN FARM LOAN BOARD
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AIRPORT PROJECT EXPENDITURES

CON

James Arthurs

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ARTHURS:

What amount, if any, has been spent for the opening of an airport at or near Emsdale, at or near South River and at Lake Two Rivers, project 144 (a) for land; (b) for

salaries and wages; (e) other expenditures; (d) board and clothing; (e) what is average number of men employed?

Topic:   AIRPORT PROJECT EXPENDITURES
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THE LATE VISCOUNT BYNG

TRIBUTES TO HERO OF VIMY AND FORMER


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Topic:   THE LATE VISCOUNT BYNG
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HERO OF VIMY AND FORMER
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL BY MR. BENNETT, MR. MACKENZIE KING AND MR. GARDINER
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker,

members of both houses of parliament and the people of Canada generally will greatly appreciate the tribute which has just been paid by the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) to the memory of the late Lord Byng. As leader of the opposition and one who for a number of years enjoyed the closest official and personal relations with Lord Byng, may I say in depp sincerity that I join with all that has been said in praise of the great career which has just drawn to its close, and of the qualities which won for Lord Byng in his lifetime not only the admiration but the abiding regard and esteem of those who served with him and of all who knew him best. The loss which Britain mourns to-day in the passing of one of her most distinguished sons is a loss which will be felt in all parts of the British empire, but in no other part as much as in this dominion. Because of his immediate contact with Canadians in the great war as commander of the Canadian corps, and of the high position he held in Canada as governor general, Lord Byng was brought, on the field of battle and in affairs of state, into closer association with a larger number of Canadians than any other person who has held either of those positions. In that twofold way his life was more intimately linked with the lives of many of our people than that of any other governor general.

I shall not attempt to review the career of the late Lord Byng; that has already been done by the Prime Minister, and indeed it is already a part of history itself. But I should like to join with the Prime Minister in giving expression to a thought or two arising out of the personal association which I was privileged to have with Lord Byng during the years that I enjoyed the intimate and close association to which I have referred. Of the many qualities which served to endear Lord Byng to those who knew him I should say the greatest of all was his ever present sense of duty. Viewing hia life as a whole, one cannot but see in it much that, from the point of view of service to the crown and to the state, was exemplary. From the very beginning of his interest in affairs it was a life of service, and service in a very large way. That life of service carried with it those characteristics of conscientiousness, fearlessness, love of

The Late Viscount Byng

justice, the desire to see the right thing done, and to further the right with which one associates faithfulness to duty. Another quality which endeared Lord Byng to those who knew him best was his great modesty and accessibility. There was something exceptionally fine in the directness and simplicity of his nature. There was nothing affected about him, he was naturalness itself in his relations with his fellow men. Moreover, by nature, he was genuinely considerate and kind. He had a very great love for his fellow men. I think it was a distinguishing characteristic, that he was particularly fond of the average man. He had an especial concern, naturally, for those who- had served with him in the great war, and it is little wonder that his name is held in reverence by the veterans of that, great struggle. But his sympathy was essentially with human nature andl with men of all classes. That was evidenced while he was in Canada by the extent to which he went from one end of this country to the other to become personally informed and acquainted with conditions, and to meet and know the people. I venture to say there are few, if any, who have held the great office of governor general in Canada who have left behind more personal friends and acquaintances than it was Lord Byng's privilege to have made during the time he was in this country.

There were other qualities, to one of which the Prime Minister has referred, which were also outstanding. Lord Byng was a great friend. I always felt in my association with him during the years I was in office that I had in him a friend with whom' I could discuss most intimately and advantageously all the affairs that came before the government for consideration. The years from 1921 to 1925 were difficult and trying years. I should like to say that throughout that period I constantly felt that the government could not have received from a governor general more helpful counsel and assistance than was sought to be given to my colleagues and myself by Lord Byng.

Perhaps I can best express what my feelings were towards Lord Byng when I say to the house that in the early part of 1926, when we were drawing near to the end of Lord Byng's term of office and it became necessary to recommend a successor, I wrote to the British Prime Minister and said that, so happy and cordial had our relations been in all respects throughout all the time that Lord Byng had heen here and we had shared so fully each others confidence, there was nothing which my colleagues and myself would

more welcome, if it were agreeable to Lord Byng himself and to His Majesty the King, than an extension or renewal of his term of office as governor general. Such was the nature of our official relations. As is known, those official relations were severed owing to a difference of view on, a constitutional question. But I felt then, I feel now, and I shall always feel, as regards both Lord Byng and myself, that each of us, with respect to that particular matter, did that which was right in his own eyes.

I feel that the empire has lost a great soldier, an exemplary citizen and a good man. I think we may all be proud that the name of Lord Byng of Vimy will have an enduring association with our dominion both at home and abroad. I join with the Prime Minister, as my colleagues on this side of the house will wish to do, in his request that Your Honour convey to Lady Byng an expression of the deep sympathy felt for her in her great bereavement by all hon,. members of this House of Commons.

Topic:   THE LATE VISCOUNT BYNG
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HERO OF VIMY AND FORMER
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL BY MR. BENNETT, MR. MACKENZIE KING AND MR. GARDINER
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. ROBERT GARDINER (Acadia):

It was with deep regret that we learned a few minutes ago of the passing of Lord Byng, former governor general of Canada. Those of us who had the privilege of meeting him here, and indeed citizens resident in different parts of Canada who had that privilege, realize that his most outstanding quality was his broad human sympathy. I join with the Prime Minister and the leader of the opposition in extending to his bereaved relatives and to all those who are near and dear to him an expression of deep sympathy with them in their sad loss.

Topic:   THE LATE VISCOUNT BYNG
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES TO HERO OF VIMY AND FORMER
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL BY MR. BENNETT, MR. MACKENZIE KING AND MR. GARDINER
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UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF

REPORT OF MACDONALD COMMISSION APPOINTED TO INQUIRE INTO CONDITIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA


On the orders of the day: Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre): I wish to ask the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Stirling) whether he has yet received the report of the Macdonald commission investigating unemployment relief in British Columbia. If so, will he table the report.


CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. GROTE STIRLING (Minister of National Defence):

The report to which the hon. member refers reached me this morning. I have not had time to look into it yet.

Privilege-Mr. Veniot

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Subtopic:   REPORT OF MACDONALD COMMISSION APPOINTED TO INQUIRE INTO CONDITIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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RADIO BROADCASTING COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


CON

Onésime Gagnon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ONESIME GAGNON (Dorchester) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the

hon. Minister of Marine (Mr. Duranleau) if he is aware that a certain number of employees of the radio broadcasting commission have not been paid since the last 15th March?

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING COMMISSION
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ALFRED DURANLEAU (Minister of Marine) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I

know that the payment of salaries of a certain number of employees of that commission, whose appointment had not been authorized by the treasury board, has been delayed for some time. Not very long ago, a list of these employees was forwarded to the treasury board and I believe that the payment of their salaries was authorized last Monday.

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING COMMISSION
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PRIVILEGE-MR. VENIOT REPORT OF HON. J. B. M. BAXTER, ROYAL COMMISSIONER


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Hon. P. J. VENIOT (Gloucester):

I desire to bring up a question of privilege, Mr. Speaker, but before doing so may I say that I hesitate to refer to this matter at this late stage of the session, when there are other more important matters to be decided before prorogation. I feel, however, that I am entitled to bring up this matter on a question of privilege. I am not sure that I am right, however, so I am now submitting the matter for Your Honour's consideration. On a question of privilege would I be entitled to deal with the report, that was laid on the table of the house yesterday, of Commissioner Baxter in connection with charges made by me on the floor of this house?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. VENIOT REPORT OF HON. J. B. M. BAXTER, ROYAL COMMISSIONER
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June 6, 1935