May 29, 1935

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

I am rising not to object to the motion, but to ask my right hon. friend if he could inform the house as to the intention oif the government, whether we shall be sitting or again adjourned on Monday next?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ASCENSION DAY ADJOURNMENT-FURTHER PROPOSED LEGISLATION
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think we shall follow

the usual course, calling it six o'clock earlier in the afternoon and then resuming in the evening. That is my present intention if that is satisfactory to the chamber.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ASCENSION DAY ADJOURNMENT-FURTHER PROPOSED LEGISLATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I say to

my right hon. friend that I think we certainly ought to sit part of the day on Monday, and as nearly the whole of the day as mlay be possible.

Could my right hon. friend indicate whether what we have 'before us now, in the way of legislation on the order paper and proposed further legislation as set forth in the votes and proceedings, is sufficiently complete to enable us to form an estimate as to about the time at which the session will be concluding? I might mention that to-morrow it will be five years since the previous parliament dissolved. 1 believe that the people of the country are more concerned about getting an opportunity of expressing either their confidence or lack of confidence in the government, and their wishes as to the policies that are to govern in the future, than they are to have us continue here putting through a mass of legislation that cannot possibly, at this stage of the session and under existing conditions, be given the consideration it should. If my right hon. friend is in a position to indicate that he expects we will be able to complete the session fairly soon, that would I think meet with the approval of all.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ASCENSION DAY ADJOURNMENT-FURTHER PROPOSED LEGISLATION
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

While I suppose that

strictly the motion before the house is not subject to debate, I may say that having regard to what transpired on Thursday, May 14, 1931, and to statements that were made since by some hon. gentlemen opposite, I thought it desirable that we should make the motion that now stands in my name. It will be remembered that the house on Ascension day, 1931, divided upon this question, unfortunately, and some of the members left the house. Hence I have always thought it

Revaluation of Gold Reserves

desirable that some arrangement should be made that would be satisfactory to all parties. We did1 sit in 1933, I think with the general approval of the house.

As far as the question of this house proroguing is concerned I may say that I am [DOT]quite as anxious as any hon, gentleman to see it prorogued. As far as the question of an election is concerned, I have pointed out *on more than one occasion that if we are to permit those who will be entitled for the first time to vote to have their names upon the lists, the business could not be expedited beyond what has already been done.

With respect to the legislation still to be introduced, I think this house probably has had more ample opportunity to consider legislation arising out of the report of the royal commission and the committee of the House of Commons on price spreads than it has had with respect to most legislation. It will be known to all members that there are some bills that have yet to be introduced to carry into effect the recommendations made by that commission. During the recess the law officers of the crown, with such legal assistance as they thought necessary, have been engaged in drafting the legislation. It has all been drafted, hnd numbers of the bills have been considered by council and are now upon the order paper. I hope that by Friday next all the bills that arise out of that report will be ready for submission to the house on the succeeding Monday, and notice will be given accordingly. That is our expectation. To those who have studied the matter it is only necessary to point out that there are large numbers of enactments upon the statute books of this country that cover many matters that are recommended for consideration of this house by that commission, and it is a somewhat tedious and tiresome and lengthy process to follow them all through in [DOT]order that proposed legislation may not overlap existing legislation. However-, I think that will be concluded, as I say, so that on Friday we may be able to give notice of the remainder of the legislation that arises out of those recommendations. There are one or two amendments to existing statutes that have to' be made, as I mentioned the other day, but that should not engage the attention of the house for any great length of time. The resolutions arising out of the budget have not yet been enacted, I believe it was the intention of the Minister of Finance, if his health permits, to take those up on Friday in order that he may advance them as rapidly as possible.

I do not think there is any reason to believe that outside of the legislation I have mentioned and the legislation that is foreshadowed on the order paper with respect to a grain board, there is any other legislation of great significance, except as I have said some amendments to existing statutes, not of great importance, that will be submitted to the house. I confidently hope that by the middle of this coming week we shall have finished our efforts towards the enactment of legislation at this session. I can only assure the right hon. gentleman and members of this house that as far as we can we shall endeavour to facilitate the early prorogation of parliament, in order, as has been said by the right hon. gentleman, that the will of the people of this country may be made known.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ASCENSION DAY ADJOURNMENT-FURTHER PROPOSED LEGISLATION
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Motion agreed to.


REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

I have a question to address to the

Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) in the absence of the Minister of Finance (Mr. Rhodes) whether in the recess of parliament an order in council was passed dealing with the valuation of the gold taken over from the chartered banks? If so, will the order in council be tabled?

Topic:   REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

While I was absent during that period, I have only to point out that there is no authority in the governor jn council to value gold at the present moment. One of the bills that may be submitted to the house is a permissive bill to come into force by proclamation in the event of it being thought desirable to revalue the gold reserves of the country. I have not any present intention of so doing, but it might well be that between now and the time the house meets again some government might regard it as desirable. My present intention is to submit to the house a bill, permissive in character, coming into force by proclamation, to deal with .that matter. I think I can assure the hon. gentleman that no order in council has been passed, because there is no authority to do so.

Topic:   REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

My information is that an order in council had been passed pursuant to one of the sections of the Bank of Canada Act which gives the governor in council discretion to fix the valuation of a [DOT]certain amount of gold taken over from the chartered banks either at S35 or S20.67. I wonder if that order in council has been passed yet?

Topic:   REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think perhaps the hon. gentleman has in mind an order in council that dealt with the percentage of the gold that the chartered banks had that was applicable

Price Spreads Commission

to their foreign obligations. I believe that an order in council was passed during the recess with respect to that. But it has nothing to do with the valuation of gold.

Topic:   REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES
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LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Yes.

Topic:   REVALUATION OF GOLD RESERVES
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OREGON BOUNDARY


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

I would direct the attention of the government to the fact that question No. 4 on the order paper was first read on April 15. .As the end of the session may be in sight I ask that consideration be given to this question.

Topic:   OREGON BOUNDARY
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

If the hon. gentleman has a clear

understanding of the implications of that question he will understand the difficulty in connection with an answer. Many inquiries have to be made with respect to it. It is a matter of first rate international importance, and a question of that kind is not usually asked in the House of Commons in that form. The question will be dealt with.

NATURALIZATION PAPERS On the orders of the day:

Topic:   OREGON BOUNDARY
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LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. JOHN VALLANCE (South Battleford):

I wish to direct a question to the Secretary of State; whether in making application for naturalization papers it is necessary for the applicant to produce evidence that he is at present employed?

Topic:   OREGON BOUNDARY
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No.

Topic:   OREGON BOUNDARY
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LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. VALLANCE:

I hold in my hand three letters that have been sent to me from the west. The letters are from the Department of the Secretary of State and one paragraph reads:

In reply to your communication of the 22nd ultimo will you be good enough to state whether or not you are permanently employed? A letter from your present employer will serve the purpose.

Topic:   OREGON BOUNDARY
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May 29, 1935