April 15, 1935

LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

I have listened

with a great deal of interest to the remarks of my hon. friend. He is almost righteously indignant about some things which' he says have happened under the provisions of the act of last year. I want to assure him at the outset that there is no cause for indignation, no cause for anxiety. There has been no loss to the treasury, and everything has been conducted in a straightforward, clean and capable manner. .

I do not propose to go into details in discussing the matter at this stage, because it seems to me that the details are scarcely relevant to the resolution which is now before the committee. We were discussing this same matter on the estimates of the Public Works department, and we are prepared to continue that discussion and go into every item which my hon. friends may desire to discuss.

My hon. friend's objections, as I gather them, may be put under two heads. He says it was wasteful to divide this work and allot it to three or four different departments; in fact I think he said that four or five new departments had been set up. Well, that is not accurate. No new departments have been set up. Under my hon. friend's administration and that of his friends, the Department of the Interior were carrying on construction through the Department of Indian Affairs. They had their architect; they had their staff. True, it is not as large as that of the Public Works department. Then the Department of National Defence has a competent staff of engineers, as my hon. friend knows, and the works which were assigned to that department were those which it was peculiarly qualified to handle. There has been no loss or detriment to the public interest in that respect. With regard to the dredging and the other work done by the Department of Marine and by harbour commissions, similar work was carried on during all the years, that my hon. friend was Minister of Public Works. The very same policy has been followed with respect to the carrying on of those works as was followed during those years, as I understand. The Minister of Marine will be able to explain that more in detail.

With regard to the inviting of tenders we had a pretty full discussion when this bill was up a year ago, and it was distinctly provided that works up to a certain amount should be under the control of the minister, and that for works beyond that amount tenders should be secured. The word "public" was with the approval of this house deliberately omitted from the provisions of that bill, so that in not inviting public tenders in certain instances we complied strictly with the pro-

visions of the act. I submit that the object of inviting public tenders is to secure competition. The only object to be served in any course that is pursued is to secure reasonable competition. There are two or three methods by which that competition can be secured. It may be secured by public tender, and I think my hon. friend will admit that not always in the case of public tender has an honest and fair competition been secured in the past. It may be secured also by asking tenders from a selected list, and it does not make any difference whether they are invited publicly or invited from a list; so long as reasonable competition is secured the public interest is protected. I invite my hon. friend to read Hansard of last session where he will find that members on both sides of this house advocated that a course should be taken to prevent a few large contracting firms from securing all the contracts because they 'had peculiar advantages, superior equipment, and so forth, and as this was a relief measure members on both sides advocated that tenders should be invited locally. That has been done, and I want to tell my hon. friends that when the estimates of the Puiblc Works department come up he can have a list of those from whom tenders were invited on each occasion, and he will find that not only was the list large enough to secure good, clean competition but in every case the competition was keen, and if in one or two cases the tenders were not satisfactory the contracts were not awarded on those tenders, and public tenders were then invited. That is the course that was adopted with respect to these tenders. We always have the protection of the architect's estimate, and if in any given case the tenders do not compare favourably with the architect's estimate there is no obligation to accept them.

All I have to say is this, that as far as I know the public interest has been protected in every case, whether public tenders were invited or whether tenders were invited locally with the object of giving the work locally and in the province in which the project was to be carried on, as was the declared intention of the act.

The new act as I have said, will follow in the main the lines of the old act, and if the same precautions are taken as have been taken in the past I am sure with regard to these tenders that the public interest will not suffer. I am just as anxious .to protect the public interest as my hon. friend is, and I want to say to him that these are peculiar times, times when it is not difficult to get competition. These are times when people come knocking at the door asking for an opportunity to

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tender; you do not have to have public advertising in order to get competition. If anything the competition has been unduly keen; if any complaint can be urged I would say that the competition has been too keen and contracts have been awarded barely at cost- in some cases the contractors say at even less than a reasonable cost. I am sure that a candid review of the situation, a careful examination of every case, will disclose that the public interest has been protected and that reasonable competition has been secured, and I am sure that that is all any member of this house ought to ask for-reasonable competition. That course will also be adapted in connection with the new act.

With regard to the two items for considerable amounts which my hon. friend suggests have been used in a manner that was not intended, let me say that the item with regard to public buildings, as my hon. friend knows, was for the purpose of putting all the public buildings in a good state of repair. During the last three or four years and possibly for a longer time than that, considerable maintenance had been deferred, and the first thing we did was to go over all these buildings and put them in fairly good repair. The work has not been completed, but the list of expenditures filed by the Minister of Finance will indicate that there was a great number of items of expenditure in this connection. That was the object and the purpose of the vote, and lit was not too large for the purpose. The number of buildings that were constructed out of the appropriation was very small indeed, and consisted of small amounts. I shall be prepared when the estimates are up to give my hon. friend a list of all these buildings.

Again I assure my hon. friend that the public interest has been safeguarded in every case. There is no hundred per cent efficiency in any method of tender. Public tenders are not one hundred per cent sound or efficient in every case, and local tenders may give just as good results as public tenders. Under the conditions of the times, and with the keen competition that has prevailed, there has been no difficulty in securing reasonable prices, and low prices, in the course that has been adopted.

My hon. friend says that in every case friends of the government were selected. He is mistaken. People have written in asking for the privilege of tendering, and that has been accorded. I know that in many cases-

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

Would my hon. friend

permit a question? Do I understand him to say that in every case wihere somebody has written in asking for the privilege of tendering it has been accorded?

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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

I did not say

in every case, but I say in many eases they have done so and in many cases their request has been granted. I have had it represented to me that many Liberals are getting these contracts and wondering why the Conservatives could not get them.

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CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

My hon. friend from West Middlesex (Mr. Elliott) belittled the suggestion I made that the Department of Railways under the previous government had let contracts, not calling upon a selected list of contractors to tender on them, but without a selected list of any kind. I looked in my desk and I happened to find here a list of twenty-one items between 1924, and May 28, 1930, in which the Department of Railways and Canals under the late government let contracts to different companies without any tender at all. It is true that they had tenders originally. For example, the last one they let was on May 28, 1930, just two months to a day before the last election. They let one for S300,000 to a company which had been given a contract six years before, and without any tender of any kind whatsoever. I have twenty-one items here running into huge figures

$119,000, $115,000, $113,000,

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

Does my hon. friend

approve of that method?

Mr. MAlSflO'N: As a matter of fact I do

not find any particular fault with it, and I am not particularly criticizing the late government. But when my hon. friend takes such a righteous attitude, a sort of holier-than-thou attitude, and suggests that we were committing a crime in calling for tenders from a group of contractors and not from everybody in Canada, I do not quite see where my hon. friends opposite were so much holier than we. So far as the hon. gentleman himself is concerned, when he was Minister of Public Works I well remember the vain effort I made over and over again to get my post office painted or to get anything done. The post office in my constituency was built in 1909, when the papulation stood at between 8,000 and 9,000 people; it is now trebled. During the time my hon. friend was Minister of Public Works I do not know how many times I appealed to him on the floor of the house. I called upon him and applied to him in every way to get some little repairs made to the post office, but I was never successful, not even to the extent of a coat of paint; not one dollar was spent on it. The place was falling down and people were writing to me and telling me about the disgraceful condition in which the

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post office stood. I would report those conditions to the minister, but not one cent would be spent. That had nothing to do with politics; oh, no, politics was not in that.

I have risen merely to point out that I hold in my hand this list of contracts. I must say that I have no particular criticism against my hon. friends opposite, but I do say the bon. member for West Middlesex, an hon. member who as a former minister of public works knows a good deal about the work of that department and of the Department of Railways and Canals, should be a little more hesitant when he seeks to criticize the present Minister of Public Works, who, according to my understanding, has called for tenders in connection with practically all of these jobs.

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

I wish to say in answer

to the Minister of Railways and 'Canals-

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CON

Frank Roland MacMillan

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacMILLAN (Saskatoon):

Tell us about the gaol farm at Regina.

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

I will discuss the matter

with the hon. member at any time he suggests.

The Minister of Railways and Canals has said that in nine years twenty-one jobs were let without public advertisement.

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CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

In one department.

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

And they were extensions of previous contracts. The minister has said he does not object to that procedure, but I cannot take a similar position. I do object to letting large contracts by invited tenders.

The Minister of Public Works has stated that he has followed the practice adopted by the former administration. He has stated of course that a change was made in the act passed last year, and he advances the argument that the department acted as it did because of a desire to have the work done by local labour. The work could be done by local labour just as well if the contract were let by public advertisement as if invited tenders were accepted. All one would have to do would be to insert a clause in a contract stating that local labour must be employed. There would be no difficulty about that, and of that fact the minister is undoubtedly aware. Inviting tenders rather than advertising for them does not ensure getting the work done by local labour. There is no defence for the system of letting contracts aggregating many millions of dollars in one year by invited tender. There is no excuse for it. If there is an excuse, then what has been the necessity of insisting upon public advertisements since the days of confederation?

I know something about the Department of Public Works, and I think it is fair to observe that that department may have followed the old rule a little more closely than some other departments. I do urge however that the system of invited tenders, except in exceptional cases, should be abandoned in connection with a great program of public works for relief purposes, to relieve unemployment to improve the conditions now obtaining. The system of inviting tenders should be abolished and one of public advertisement take its place.

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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

As the hon. member is no doubt aware, to a very great extent contracts in the Department of Public Works were awarded by public tender. That is true of all the larger undertakings. For purposes of illustration may I state" what happened in one case when a contract was awarded to an outside contractor. At a certain point a building was to be erected, for which, work an outside contractor was awarded the contract. He landed in the little town bringing with him all supplies which had been purchased in the city, and also had the services of a complete staff. The hon. member will understand that in these peculiar times, when in most localities unemployment exists, the citizens will bring pressure to bear to see that any work done is given to the people in the respective localities. He will realize just how strong would be the protest if a contractor from Toronto landed in London or the village of 'Glencoe for the purpose of erecting a tower or placing a clock on the public building, and brought with him his own help and supplies. The strongest possible representations have been made from every direction urging that so far as possible the works should be awarded to local contractors and supplies purchased locally. In specifications we have inserted a clause providing that the contractor must employ a reasonable quota of local labour and of returned soldiers. In these difficult days we are doing our best to meet existing conditions, to distribute the work among all contractors, to see that the larger contractors do not get it all and that the local contractors get their share. We are attempting to deal with the matter sympathetically from the point of view of local conditions and in such a manner that plants may be kept operating and1 in a position to employ the largest possible amount of local labour.

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LIB

John Campbell Elliott

Liberal

Mr. ELLIOTT:

Has there been any difficulty in any of the cases in which it has been prescribed in the advertisement for tender that local labour must be employed?

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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

Oh, yes. I have had many protests to the effect that contractors from the outside have not fully respected the clause in their contract and specifications, and that local people have not received t'heiir fair share of employment. Sometimes I have felt the representations were justified, and I have had to appeal to the contractor with a view to having him employ a larger percentage of people in the immediate vicinity.

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LIB

Paul Mercier

Liberal

Mr. MERCIER (St. Henri):

The resolution before the house is as follows:

That it is expedient to bring in a measure to create employment by public works and undertakings throughout Canada, and to authorize the government to guarantee equipment securities of the Canadian National Railways and Canadian Pacific Railway Company in the amount of $15,000,000.

I take it for granted that in the ordinary course of events the bill founded upon the resolution will become law. I am most concerned however in the question how the moneys will 'be divided. Hon. members are aware that in the western section of Montreal we have a large plant known as the Canadian Car and Foundry Company, Limited. When that plant was operating at full capacity about

3,000 people were employed, but for the past three years the number of employees has averaged only about 100, and at times only 50. Formerly in the manufacture of railway cars, diners and freight cars the plant gave employment to tool makers, carpenters, varnish-ers, painters, and workmen engaged in other trades. To-day these operations are greatly limited. The birds have built their nests in the chimneys and we do not see the smoke or hear the whistles which tell that men are working. All these men are anxious to go back to work. When the $15,000,000 is divided up I hope that the eastern and western parts of Montreal will get their share. The Angus shops and the Canadian Car and Foundry Company should be considered in the distribution of this money so that as many workers as possible may be given employment. This foundry has always built the cars for the Canadian National Railways and I contend they should get a fair share of the money to be spent. If 2,000 people at present unemployed were able to go back to work, a considerable load would be lifted from the shoulders of the relief commission. All these men are sincere in their desire to go back to work and they should be given work not only in their own interest but in the interest of Canada as a whole.

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CON

Ambrose Upton Gledstanes Bury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURY:

Mr. Chairman, I have neither the intention nor the desire to. follow the

hon. member for West Middlesex (Mr. Elliott) in his wanderings beyond the ambit of the resolution, but I should like to refer to one point raised by the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Stewart). When the public works program bill was being considered last year I believe I was the first member of the house to plead that when contracts under a certain figure were considered, tenders should be confined to local contractors in cities of such size as to create genuine competition. This plea was listened to with a great deal of sympathy and received general support from both sides of the house. I think this was rightly so when we realize that the express purpose of the bill was to provide relief rather than simply to erect certain structures or buildings. It was intended to give as much work as possible to the different communities of Canada. I argued, and I believe my argument was listened to with sympathy, that the purposes of the legislation would not be effective unless some limitation were placed upon the principle of tendering. A large contractor is able to carry his overhead at a comparatively small percentage of his turnover; such a contractor might be successful in obtaining a contract in a nearby city and could come into that city and underbid for a certain job. A considerable amount was allotted to Calgary for a building in connection with the Department of National Defence. A contractor fortunate enough to obtain a large proporton of this contract could go into Edmonton and underbid for work in that city. In this way the purpose of the bill would be defeated. It is of no use to say that when you call for tenders for the erection of a building in Edmonton and a contractor in Calgary, Winnipeg or Montreal obtains the contract, it can be provided in the specifications that local labour must be employed. It is only natural that some local labour will be used, because a contractor is not going to put himself to the expense of transporting the labour from the city to which he belongs. But he will bring his key men and members of his staff, and perhaps considerable of the needed material. The best part of the money spent on the contract will not remain in the locality. Any profit there may be on the contract will be carried back to the contractor's home city. The money earned by his key men and his staff also will be taken away. For these reasons it was logically and properly urged that this principle be adopted, and it was looked upon favourably by the house.

Public tenders were called for in Edmonton, and although it was not stipulated that the

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tenderers must be local men, we were fortunate in having a local man put in the lowest tender. I understand that he is likely to get the contract. A principle which might be perfectly sound when the only purpose of a construction program is merely to provide buildings or structures for the use of the government may not be applicable when the purpose of a program is to provide work in as large a measure as possible under the circumstances. Therefore I think the policy adopted by the Department of Public Works was not only entirely justified but was in accordance with the views and wishes of the majority of hon. members of this house.

I should like to refer briefly to that part of the resolution providing for $15,009,000 as a guarantee, for the purchase of railway equipment. I ask that as much of this work as possible be done locally. In the Canadian National shops in Edmonton we have had 94 men laid off in the car and coach department. A census taken of 63 of these men shows that 54 of them are on relief, some of them having been from ten to seventeen years in the Canadian National service!, and they are now in danger of losing their pension rights and their homes. That is a very serious matter for them, and when we look back at the conditions out of which this situation arose we have to recognize that the men themselves are not to blame for it. Years ago this country, under the influence of a too optimistic conception and estimate of its railway requirements, branched out in every direction in an inflated program' of railway construction. Our program was too optimistic; our actual railway development was too optimistic; but these men entered the service of the railway with the natural assurance that they were entering into what was practically steady and regular employment. They did so on the strength of the wisdom and the decision and action of this parliament, and after working there for from ten to seventeen years they are now out of employment largely as the result of over-optimism in those years. Surely it is the duty of this country to do everything within reason, when work is going, to see that it is spread among the railway men as far as possible. I do not say that all the money can necessarily be used in this way, but I am pleading that to the very limit of possibility the moneys granted in this way be used in repairs in order to take back men in the railway repair shops for the construction of new rolling stock and in equipment, where such equipment is made. I therefore join with the other members of the committee -on both sides of the house who have urged this upon the minister.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I wish to follow what my hon. friend (Mr. Bury) has said with regard to the general principle which he said was advocated last year in the house and generally accepted, and I desire to direct the attention of the committee to the manner in which that has been carried out, at least in one or two instances that have been brought to my notice. I realize that the minister is under some handicap because he lays down to a certain extent general principles and the reports of his officers indicate to him that things are being done in such and such a direction. The only way to test these things is by finding out whether in concrete instances the general principle is carried out as suggested by my hon. friend from East Edmonton (Mr. Bury). The hon. gentleman laid down a principle which he said he advocated last year, that in connection with jobs, in the smaller communities at any rate, tenders be called for from all local contractors and that there be genuine competition; and he stressed the fact that the sort of competition he meant should be genuine and real. That general principle perhaps is not to be objected to at all, but I would point out to the hon. gentleman that that is not what most of us are really concerned with. We are not concerned with outside contractors coming in. It is all very well to discuss that, but after all that is not the cause of most of the waste of public money which is going on in the country. The waste of public money is going on because they are not merely limiting the call for tenders to people in the place but they are limiting them to one or two Conservatives in the place, and there is no competition whatever. 'I will give my hon. friend an example or two. I am surprised at it myself and I am sure the minister does not know about it; but it is only by having concrete examples that we can understand what is going on.

I am looking at a paper, the Eastern Chronicle, which published a report with regard to some repairs made in the town of Pictou involving $9,000. That is not a large amount, but it would provide work for quite a number of people and give the necessaries of life to quite a number of women and children. How was the money spent? There were several jobs to be done, and this is the genuine competition, the real competition, to use my hon. friend's expression, which was adopted in that instance. There were general repairs to be done and tenders were asked from a gentleman by the name of McKay and a gentleman named Adamson. There was cementing on the driveway to be done and tenders were

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called for from a gentleman named McCuish and a gentleman named Adamson. And there were general repairs in the customs house and tenders were called for from a gentleman by the name of McKay and a gentleman by the name of Adamson. Adamson was a competing tenderer in all three jobs, and strange to say he just missed getting the job by a hair in each instance. I may tell the committee that Adamson is not a contractor; he is connected with a company that runs a planing mill and he is a prominent Conservative worker. In view of this fact I am not so sure that the genuine competition, the real competition which my hon. friend has spoken about, took place in connection with that work. What was the result? The result was that Mr. McKay tendered $2240 for general repairs and Adamson just missed getting the job; he tendered $10 higher and McKay got the job. In connection with the cement work on the driveway MdCuish tendered $750, and this competitor, who was supplying the real, genuine competition, tendered $780, with the result that McCuish got the job. For the general repairs in the customs house McKay tendered S3,400 and Adamson, the same gentleman, who was not a carpenter nor a contractor, tendered $3,520, in order to furnish the real, genuine competition we have been hearing about. The result was that McKay got all three jobs. Three times Adamson just missed getting it.

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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Purposely.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I do not know; no one would suggest that. I do suggest however that the competition was not as genuine as we are led to believe, nor was the call for tenders as widespread as the boundaries of the town of Pictou, because there are no fewer than six carpenter contractors in that town, and the only men who were asked for tenders were McKay and Adamson. And, as I say, Adamson just tendered high enough to allow McKay to get in under the wire. To add a little more to this real competition, Mr. McKay was given the job, without tendering at all, of fixing up the janitor's quarters at $900. So that we have Mr. McKay getting three jobs amounting to $6,540. There were two more jobs in connection with painting, and here we see some, of the real, the genuine competition. Tenders were asked for from two men, Mr. Veniot and Mr. Munsie. This was in connection with exterior and interior painting in the post office building. Mr. Veniot tendered $900 and Mr. Munsie $985, and of course Mr. Veniot got the job. But he did not get the job in connection with the customs house 92582-175

because here we find that Munsie tendered $1,500 against Mr. Veniot's $1,590. In the first job, the post office, Munsie was $85 above Veniot and on the customs building Veniot was $90 above Munsie, so they called it a day and did the work together on both buildings. I understand one man hired his son and the other man hired another man. That was the amount of spread that was made in regard to the work that was to be done for the needy in connection with those painting jobs. That is the situation that prevailed in the town of Pictou. I call that to the attention of the Minister of Public Works, and also the hon. member for East Edmonton, who has laid down a principle which appeals to us of its being desirable to spread the work around. But is it spreading it around when one contractor tenders just high enough to let the other man in, or, as in the case of the painting jobs, when tenders are called for from two men, one of them gets one job and the other gets the other, and they do the two jobs together? That is an example which shows where money is not being properly expended. The .minister may call for tenders from local contractors, but in that case let him have some competition between them. That is one point.

The other point is referred to by the hon. member for East Edmonton, who suggested that this work should be spread around among the needy; that it was not a job for partisans at all. I have consistently said in this house-and I do not take it back now-* I understand perfectly the system by which not unnaturally the friends of those who happen to be in power get positions in connection with ordinary public works' estimates, but I have .contended, and I stick to this, that in connection with relief matters that system should not prevail. The money is voted for the same purpose as the dole, to keep body and soul together; therefore it should reach the people for whom it is intended-the needy, whether they be Liberal or Conservative, black or white. In that regard I have brought to the attention of the Minister of Public Works on a number of occasions, not big cases, not cases where large general principles can be laid down, but cases in which when the work is being done, the foreman put there is discriminating against the needy in the locality, leaving off people with large families and taking on single men simply because they happen to be of the same politics as he is.

I have brought to the minister's attention a couple of cases of that kind which were brought to my notice only the other day.

Public Works Program

One in Halifax was brought to my attention by the local member there. He wired me in connection with the work at Sambro where eleven single men without dependents were working on the wharf-they were all Conservatives-while about eight or ten families in that community were in want. They were Liberals and did not get a job. I brought that to the attention of the minister and he said that he would investigate. The regretted death occurred of the district engineer down there and I do not know whether the minister has had a report, but I bring to his notice that under the system which prevails in his department and under the system of administration of relief in this country, the report is .made too late; the horse is stolen by the time you get to the stable. The work is done; the money is spent; party heelers have their share of it, and the needy are once more on the bread line and looking to the municipality for help. There ought to be a quicker method of getting a report or a more efficient way of enforcing the rule which the minister says prevails. It may prevail in the department up here, but it does not prevail among the foremen who are giving out these jobs. That rule ought to be put into force on the work rather than in the Public Works department here.

The other case is one about which I wrote him some three weeks ago, on March 20, I believe. It was a case in Clarke's Harbour on Cape Sable island where the report as it came to me was that single men were working on the job while men with large families and in need were being kept off it. I do not know what answer my hon. friend has to make, but that is the situation as it was presented to me. Accepting all the principles which the hon. member for East Edmonton has laid down, I gave the minister some cases where those principles are not being carried out. We may have our big relief problem and we may legislate and vote money, but .if that money does not get to the public who need the food and clothing and whose children are hungry and cold, we are not doing very much in the way of carrying out a real relief system, and we might as well shut up shop. We are voting this money for the purpose of getting it to the people; you cannot feed the people on fine principles or regulations. I therefore point out to the minister, first, that this system of calling for local tenders is a waste of money unless there is general competition. Second, I bring to his attention the cases of needy people who are not being looked after.

Topic:   WORKS, UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEES OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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CON

Felix Patrick Quinn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. QUINN:

May I say a word at this point, since the hon. member for Shelbume-

Yarmouth (Mr. Ralston) has mentioned a case in Halifax? He referred to the Sambro work. That contract was given out by tender and the contractor who was awarded the job is a Liberal. I have had several complaints from the people who live right in the district in which the work is going on, that this contractor gave all the work to Liberal friends from outside while men in the district of Sambro and the adjoining district of Camper-down were idle.

Topic:   WORKS, UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEES OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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April 15, 1935