April 9, 1935

CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

Shut up, you fools.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I must ask the hon. member to withdraw the remark he has made to the opposition members. He has used a word which is not parliamentary and I must ask him to withdraw it.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Withdraw.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

Of course I have to withdraw it, no matter what they look like. I did want to ask the hon. gentleman a question in all sincerity and I thought he would answer it.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Go ahead.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

All I want to know is the date on which the statement attributed to the Prime Minister was made.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

The statement with respect to legislation? I have not got it before me, but I have a clear recollection and I will get the statement and hand it to the hon. gentleman.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

That is all I want to know.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

I think it is imperative that this session should be ended; I do not think it is at all necessary to have this delay. I do not think that even the illness of the Prime Minister warrants delay at this late stage in the life of this parliament. We have seen almost every promise made by this government broken, and we have seen the futility of the legislation they have brought down. That legislation has not in any single instance effected a cure or brought about any relief in the situation that now exists. Take the statement which has been made by my hon. friend from Bellechasse (Mr. Boulanger). We were told that by an increase in tariffs unemployment would be ended in Canada; the electors of the country were given that assurance. The Liberal opposition in the House of Commons have remained quiescent; they have given this government every chance in the world, they have subscribed to any -particular legislation that seemed to be in the interests of the people, though the opposition have warned the government of course on all occasions that the legislation would be without effect. And has not our word been amply proven? What is the state of employment to-day? Has there been any relief to the unemployment situation

in the last three or four years? For two or three years we have been hearing that business was on the upgrade, prosperity being just around the corner, but statements of that kind are no longer being made by members of the government. It has -been conceded not only by business men but -by economists that the root of all evil of the trouble lies in the fa-ct that this government have placed barriers against trade and restricted trade on every occasion; hence the position in which we find ourselves to-day. Year after year we have had deficits and additional taxation, and year after year individuals engaged in the basic industries of the country, with the exception of gold mining and the production of nickel, have found themselves in the unfortunate position of being less able to pay their taxes than in previous years. What is the situation today? Unless there is a- right about face in Canada, we shall not be able to pay the taxes imposed on us. Worse than that, the effect of this legislation has spread to the provinces, for the provincial governments are facing difficulties right and left. Take the financial statement of any of the provinces; does it make pleasant reading? Have we a feeling that we are making progress, or do we not rather feel that we are going backward? Every one of the provinces has to announce deficit after deficit with an addition to its debt. Need I tell you. Mr. Speaker, that t-here can be only one end to this sort of thing? In a private business it does not matter who finds himself in this unfortunate position, he must sooner or later succumb and have the sheriff take control.

The government of the day have made much of the fact that they have preserved the credit of Canada and have been able to pay their way. Well, they have been able to pay their way by further borrowing; that is the only way. Then they -take much credit for the fact that they have had favourable balances of trade. How are favourable balances of trade secured? When they took office the trade of the country was nearly two and a quarter billions, and what is it to-day? It has gradually decreased until it averages a little over one billion, and by the reduction in trade, by restriction of imports into the country and partly by the empire agreements, regarding which I shall have a word or two to say, they have been able to show a favourable balance of trade. But they have done so at the expense of the people of Canada; there is a heavier burden of taxation on the people's shoulder's, added to every session of parliament, and that condition would continue -were hon. gentlemen permitted to hold another session.

______Long Adjournment-Mr. Stewart (Edmonton)

My hon. friends do not seem to realize that there must be, as I say, a right about face in the policy of the government before the people can secure any relief. That does not seem to occur to them. No; we have nothing but procrastination in dealing with these matters. My hon. friends have imbibed the spirit of nationalism from other countries despite the fact other countries are in as difficult a situation. They follow these other countries; there is no originality about their proposals for relief. All we are told is .that their social legislation will meet the difficulties of the situation. Will anyone tell me how unemployment insurance will benefit the situation? I have not yet discovered anyone who wants it as we have it under the present act. How will the shortening of hours of labour and the minimum wage improve matters? An amusing thing gleaned from the report this afternoon, which one reporter seems to have got hold of in some way, is the statement that they are not recommending a forty-eight hour week but one of forty-four hours. Again, the government of the day find themselves in the unfortunate position of having to make changes in that respect. I suppose this is the reason: They want to have some relief, some time to get their second wind, to see whether they cannot think up some new idea that will catch the popular fancy.

I was greatly amused yesterday listening to the Minister of Justice (Mr. Guthrie) when he made a statement as to when the election would be. He said dispassionately to this house that they would have an election when they thought they could win. If we have to wait until this government think they can win, we may as well all go home and go to work and wait another five years.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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CON

Eccles James Gott

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GOTT:

There is not a safe Liberal

seat from the head of the lakes to the coast.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

We should

have had an election last year. I believe that if the government had had the courage to face the electors last year they would have had a much better chance than they have to-day. They got some false courage after the Prime Minister's broadcasts, and for a time they were greatly encouraged. I was told by one who is in the councils of the mighty that at last they had struck something that tickled the popular fancy. But the real reason for their change of heart was the fact that one of their number became a malcontent, he was not satisfied to pursue the tenor of their way and went out on his own. I refer to the Hon.

Mr. Stevens. He broadcast his ideas throughout the country and scared the life out of the government, and they succumbed to fear.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

He is not a malcontent; he is an honest man.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

Hon. gentlemen opposite had a change of heart largely as a result of his propaganda.

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LIB

Cameron Ross McIntosh

Liberal

Mr. McINTOSH:

A change of heart over night.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

They would change in a minute if they thought it would catch a vote. It is a question of staying in power at any cost, on any program. Look at our friends in the comer, they have done nothing but smile, largely in derision, since they came to this session, at the spectacle of hon. gentlemen across the floor who in large measure have stolen their clothes. They go to sleep once in a while and wake up and discover that some of their most attractive garments are gone. Not up-to-date foreooth; and indeed they have troubles of their own. In our province we have a new cult, that of Social Credit as enunciated by Mr. Douglas, and now improved upon materially by one named Eberhart. So my friends in the corner are doing their best to stem the tide, and between what Eberhart is doing and what this government has done to them they are in a somewhat difficult situation. They are watching their clothing; even their underwear is in danger, there is nothing safe to be left loose around while this government is in power, if they thought it would tickle popular fancy.

Now, Air. Speaker, I do not know what sort of program we shall be presented with after May 20, after the government have cogitated for another six weeks. I do not know whether that program will be heralded by a broadcast. I fancy it will not for I think the earlier broadcasts are recognized as having been a huge mistake; they were prematurely exploded before they reached the objective, and of course as with all duds the reaction was disastrous for the Tory party. They will probably have something which they hope will catch the popular fancy of people in the towns and cities as a result of this price spreads investigation.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

Don't sneer at

Mr. Stevens, he is an honest man and everyone knows it.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Air. STEWART (Edmonton):

I am not sneering, I consider Mr. Stevens a very shrewd politician. I did not know however that my

2554 COMMONS

Long Adjournment-Mr. Stewart (Edmonton)

hon. friend had espoused his cause. I do know that there is considerable dissension about the leadership. My hon. friend knows something about the various aspirants for leadership; if I have time I shall have a word or two to say about that. But there are not many men in Mr. Stevens' class and I have not a single word to say against him.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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CON

Martin James Maloney

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MALONEY:

What about Mr. King's

proposed broadcast?

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

I will let

the hon. member into a secret if he will have patience. He heard my remark that even the underwear of hon. members down in the corner is not safe, everything that seems to have any appeal is grabbed. It struck me while sitting here listening patiently to hon. gentlemen opposite defending their budget that they would mighty well like to get some inspiration as to a policy that would have some appeal and that might help to save their deposits at the next election.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (Hamilton):

What is your

policy, if you have any?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   OBJECTION TO PROLONGED ADJOURNMENT EXPRESSED IN AMENDMENT TO MOTION FOR COMMITTEE
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April 9, 1935