March 26, 1935

CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. C. H. CAHAN (Secretary of State):

Just as soon as the clerks of the different departments can obtain the information and put it in typewriting.

Topic:   MILITARY EXPENDITURES
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PURCHASE AND SALE OF GOLD


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

According to press dispatches the United [DOT] States government is offering gold for silver.

Is the government considering taking up that offer with a view to augmenting the gold stocks of the country?

Hon. E.N. RHODES (Minister of Finance):

I will look at the question submitted by the hon. gentleman, but I take it that the answer will be in any case that the government will pursue the policy which it has hitherto followed of disposing of Canadian gold at the highest market price, whether in the United States or Great Britain.

Topic:   PURCHASE AND SALE OF GOLD
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RELIEF TO MUNICIPALITIES


On the orders of the day:


PRO

Archibald M. Carmichael

Progressive

Mr. A. M. CARMICHAEL (KindeTsley):

I have a question to ask, which perhaps might properly be answered by the Minister of Agriculture. I have here a letter from the secretary of the rural municipality of Kindersley in regard to the borrowing of money from the banks for taking care of spring relief, buying seed, feed and tractor fuel. He states that the bank refuses to loan money to the municipalities on provincial government guarantees. They state1 that they will not advance any money until the dominion acts jointly with the province in guaranteeing the loans. Has such a request been made to the dominion government and if so what action is being taken? *

Topic:   RELIEF TO MUNICIPALITIES
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

The hon. member's question will be taken as a notice. It will come under the Finance department, although it is primarily a provincial matter.

Topic:   RELIEF TO MUNICIPALITIES
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ILLUSTRATION STATION


'On the orders of the day: Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford): On Monday, March 18, I inquired of the Minister of Agriculture whether he was considering the establishing of another illustration station north of the North Saskatchewan river in northwestern Saskatchewan. He did not have the information that day but he promised an investigation and reply. He has not yet given the reply. Can he give it to-day?


CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

No. I have not the information at hand but I shall be glad to send it to the hon. member.

Topic:   ILLUSTRATION STATION
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THE BUDGET

DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE


The house resumed from Friday, March 22, consideration of the motion of Hon. E. N. Rhodes ^Minister of Finance) that Mr. Speaker do now leave the chair for the house to go into committee of ways and means.


LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Shelburne-Yar-mouth):

With those on this side of the

house I have listened, as we always listen, with a great deal of pleasure to my hon. friend the Minister of Finance (Mr. Rhodes) in the presentation of his annual budget

The Budget-Mr. Ralston

speech. We listened this time with perhaps rather more interest, because we realized that the Minister of Finance was playing the leading role in the farewell performance of this government in that annual play of lights and shadows which is called the budget. I wish to congratulate my hon. friend, as I always can, on the way in which he filled the role. He lived up to the best traditions of the high office which he occupies. But I do feel that when the time comes for the authors of the piece-and after all many a good actor is spoiled by the lines he is given-for his collaborators, his colleagues in the government, to come before the curtain, the results in the nine by-elections which have already taken place and in the four provincial elections indicate pretty well the reception which they will get.

My hon. friend's speech was, if I may say so without offence, a bit dreary. I noticed a number of hon. members opposite who succumbed to the arms of Morpheus during its delivery and there may also have been those on this side who did likewise; I do not know. But there was to those of us who sit on this side of the house at least one very interesting feature of the budget, and that was the indication which ran like a red thread through the whole speech that at long last the government had come to realize that the trade and tariff policies which had been nearly the ruination of this country for the past four years had been futile. We were reminded-and I shall compare portions of what my hon. friend said in his budget speech with them1-of some utterances which were made just before the last election and which were couched1 in an entirely different tone from that employed by my hon. friend the other afternoon. I refer to the speech of the Prime Minister at Vancouver when he said:

If Mr. Mackenzie King thinks I will not so build up our agricultural and industrial life that its strength will drive our products into the markets of the world, then he is wrong. For that I will do. If he thinks I will not establish new markets for these products, strive with all my heart to retain them, drive our products with all my power into new markets, into old markets, into reluctant markets, he is wrong. For that I will do.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, bear.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

If my hon. friends will applaud-what is the fact-that in the last year the total trade of Canada was just one-half the average trade of the last five years of Liberal rule, they will realize how successful that driving has been. This is another speech

made in Winnipeg when he said addressing the farmers: .

Tell me, when did free trade fight for you? You say tariffs are only for the manufacturers.

I will make them fight for you as well. I will use them to blast a way into the markets that have been closed to you.

And then at Victoria he said:

It is true we must have foreign markets-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

There are signs of conversion even across the way among my hon. friends.

It is true we must have foreign markets, and as I said the other evening we will blast a way to those markets on a worldwide basis with any exportable surpluses. We do not have to worry about that.

What a change there has been. After these speeches the Prime Minister went to Great Britain in 1932 with his policy of blasting a way into the markets of the world, having made a ten per cent increase in tariffs before he went, and demanded that they must take steps without delay; that there was no room for compromise; that it was a time for plain speaking; that they must decide once and for all, and my right hon. friend with his musket on his shoulder, a machine gun under one arm and an ammonal tube under the other started out to blast a way into the markets of the world. The government put up tariffs; in 1930 they raised the tariff on one hundred and six items; in 1931 on a hundred and twenty-nine items and in 1932 on one hundred and thirty-eight items or a tariff increase on three hundred and seventy-three items altogether. They invented a new form of dumping duty, a provision whereby valuations for duty purposes should be based not on the domestic price of the goods which were being imported but on the cost in this country. That however was not good enough and they changed it next year so that valuations need have no principle, no standard whatever in order to be fixed by the Minister of National Revenue. They put on exchange dumping and they provided for seasonal valuations; they did everything they could to provide for exchange controls and invented every possible device by which the business men and consumers of this country might be irritated. That was all done as a means of blasting a way into the markets of the world. Now, having led the world in that, having taken a place in the vanguard of economic nationalism, because that is what they did, having

The Budget-Mr. Ralston

proclaimed the doctrine of Canada first, they come here in 1935 with the Minister ol Finance giving utterance to these words:

The unsatisfactory conditions in agriculture and certain other primary industries are in the main due to the low level of international trade resulting from the spread throughout the world of exaggerated economic nationalism, excessive interferences with trade through quotas and exchange controls, and fluctuating currencies.

il say that we welcome this budget in that it indicates at least a last-minute repentance, a last-minute change, an admission now that the tariff policies which were laid down in 1930, 1931, and 1932 were wrong.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURAXLEAU:

Not at all.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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March 26, 1935