March 22, 1935

LIB
CON

Harry Bernard Short

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SHORT:

I said in the maritimes and

particularly in Nova Scotia. I think the hon. member for Gloucester (Mr. Yeniot) will admit that New Brunswick does not have the beauties which are to be found in Nova Scotia.

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LIB
CON

Harry Bernard Short

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SHORT:

I hope that Nova Scotia

will receive her full share of this money when it is being expended. We have room for more tourists than are coming at the present time and this year we are looking forward to the greatest influx since 1929. When the minister is allotting this money to the different provinces, I hope he will see that Nova Scotia gets her full share. I am sure he will, be-[Mr. Willis. 1

cause he realizes that we are entitled to it. We have every attraction to offer the tourist -deep sea fishing, tuna fishing, inland fishing and every sport that he is looking for. I can only join with my colleague from Cape Breton in extending to hon. members a cordial invitation to visit the most beautiful province in the dominion.

Mr. PER'LEY (Qu'Appelle): I wish to

express my approval of this item in the minister's estimates. I have listened with considerable pleasure to those who have spoken on the item advocating the beauty spots in their respective provinces, and I trust that when this money is being spent for advertising, the beauty spots of Saskatchewan will have due consideration; and I plead particularly for Qu'Appelle. I think we have in that constituency some of the finest scenery to be found in Canada. I refer to the historic Qu'Appelle valley and river, which got its name, as history relates, from this incident. An Indian woman went to draw water from the lake; she heard an echo in the ravine and she replied, " qu'appelle?"-who calls? This valley runs parallel to the Canadian Pacific Railway and No. 1 highway from the Manitoba boundary about two hundred miles. It is a picturesque valley and in different sections it widens out a mile or two, forming lakes. These are peaceful lakes in the middle of the valley. At lake Kalipwa, at lake Echo and at lake Qu'Appelle we have beautiful scenery, and I would mention the historic town of Fort Qu'Appelle, where there was once established the old Hudson's Bay fort. At one time we thought that this particular site would be the capital of the territory. Along these lakes we have summer resorts and camps and it is a splendid place for tourists who wish to spend a few days of quiet. Sports of all sorts can be indulged in, golfing, tennis, fishing, bathing and everything that adds to the pleasure of the tourist. To get into this valley there are very good roads branching from No. 1 highway and leading through the great wheat plains of Saskatchewan. The wheat plains between the main highway and this valley are the plains which were first settled by the pioneers who went into that province, and in August you can go through miles of waving grain. It is a magnificent sight.

I know that there are many other hon. gentlemen who are anxious to speak on this item and I do not want to take up too much time, but I trust the minister will see that when advertising is being done we shall get our due share. I think this is a splendid thing. The Canadian people should be en-

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couraged in their efforts to induce our friends from the south and from other countries as well to come to Canada and enjoy our scenic beauties. I fully support this vote.

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UFA

Edward Joseph Garland

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARLAND (Bow River):

Unlike

hon. members who have preceded me, I am not going to boast about the native beauties of my own constituency; I think they are well enough known to need no further word from me. I do wish however to direct the attention of the minister to one way in which this vote might be usefully disposed of. There is to the north of this capital city a beautiful territory with certain peculiar characteristics that are unexcelled. There is very good skiing in winter, and in summer this territory cannot be surpassed for the sheer pleasure of travelling and, I should have hoped, for fishing. I regret to say however that while it is one of my great privileges to be able to travel through the Gatineau country a few times every session, I have noticed in recent years that there has been serious destruction of the forest along the roads. No one knows better than the minister that roads stripped of trees are quite unsightly; they are not attractive, because people do not care for a country that has been stripped of its forest timber. What steps the minister can take I do not know, but if he could see to it that the trees along the roads in the Gatineau are no longer cut down, he would to some extent preserve some of the beauties of that country, which would continue to attract tourists.

I have also complained in the second place -this time the complaint would more properly be registered in the provincial' house in Quebec, but I make the complaint publicly so that it will reach them-against the practice of leasing the fishing rights on the lakes and streams in the Gatineau and other districts to a few wealthy Americans and in some instances Canadians and people of other nationalities, such leases running from five to nine years or longer. It means that for a certain type of tourist there is no particular attraction to that country at all. All the fishing advantages of a territory like that could be preserved by fair and rigorously enforced legislation-game protection, fish protection and so on. But where it is turned over to a feiw individuals who can afford that sort of camp, and the beauty of the lakes and rivers is closed to the public, we cannot expect the tourist traffic into that country to continue, a country so badly afflicted with that type of law. I suggest to the minister that, with respect to territory of that sort, he take the matter up with the provincial

governments with a view to modifying their leasing system in regard to fishing. This does not apply to Quebec alone but to the mari-times as well; it applies to some of the most beautiful streams down there. I should like to see a little more freedom in regard to the fishing rights in this country, particularly for the ordinary man who cannot afford more than a holiday by car, spending his time at touring camps, and getting any fishing he can. Such people cannot pay the high licence fees required in territories where fishing rights have been let to individuals in the way I have stated, nor can they afford even the ordinary fishing licence required for day to day fishing. In regard to these two particulars, the clearing of timber along the road and the over-restrictive methods in connection with fishing, there lies one of the serious difficulties in the tourist business, and I hope the minister will look into the Gatineau district problem as soon as possible.

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LIB

Olof Hanson

Liberal

Mr. HANSON (Skeena):

I congratulate the minister on the increase in this vote. It so happens that in my country of origin it was realized half a century ago that tourists are a national asset. Since I came to this country I have located in British Columbia, the most beautiful province of the dominion. I have had occasion to visit quite a number of places, from the South Sea islands to the European continent, from the Mediterranean to the North cape, and in those different parts of the world there is nothing to excel what we have in Canada. So far as British Columbia is concerned, the inland passage is fully equal to anything that one can see in the northern fiords^ the mountain scenery which we have in British Columbia along the coast and also in the interior is fully equal to anything that one can see in the Alps, and as regards the coast of the maritime provinces with its fish and game, which is such a drawing card to the tourists, I may point out that we have all that in British Columbia, as can be seen by taking the trip from Puget sound via the inland passage to Alaska.

I repeat that I compliment the minister and the government on increasing this appropriation. The government evidently realizes that the' tourist traffic will be one of our national assets for all time to come.

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

We have heard members from all parts of Canada singing the praises and beauties of their respective constituencies. All this goes to show that no one part of this dominion has a corner on attractions. I have grown up in what used to be called the great

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lone land of the northwest-Fort Garry. It is a great lone land no longer; we have there one of the most enterprising and attractive cities in the dominion. In the thousand lakes and hills that span the upper part of Manitoba there are unsurpassed beauties. In the deltas around our lakes we have the most excellent wildfowl hunting, and in various part of the province big game hunting is unsurpassed by that in any other part of Canada; neither do we take a back seat in fishing, because in lake Winnipeg and lake Manitoba the whitefish and the sturgeon compare favourably with any similar fish that are found elsewhere in this country.

I did not however get up to sing the praises of Manitoba, but I should like to point out that there is no other part of Canada which has the beauty and natural attractiveness that my province has. The thought that was in my mind was this: this appropriation of $200,000, or at all events some of it, could be put to very good use in hastening the completion of the transcontinental highway, because when that road is built from one coast to the other there will be no more beautiful or interesting automobile route anywhere else in the world. I have not travelled very much myself, but I have been across the prairies of Canada to the west coast and I know my own province pretty well. I believe the best thing we can do with a good deal of this money is to spend it on improving the national highway. When it is improved and completed, we shall not require to spend very much money on advertising the beauty or attractiveness of this country; our chief difficulty will be to regulate the traffic on the road. [DOT]

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UFA

Michael Luchkovich

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. LUCHKOVICH:

In the Vegreville riding we have a park known as Elk Island park, which is so beautiful that if I tried to describe it adequately, words would wholly fail me. Therefore I do not wish to spoil the picture by any word description of my own, but I suggest to the minister that when he finally decides to issue circulars, or whatever he wishes to do in regard to this matter, he let the tourists who visit that part of the country know that a few miles south of Lamont there is a park called Elk Island park. In this circular I hope he will picture this park in larger capital letters than any other parks that have been mentioned here to-day.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

So far as tourists are concerned, may I say there is nothing finer or more attractive in Canada than the Prince Albert National park. There are other parts of Prince Albert constituency which are

equally beautiful, and I hope the tourist bureau will do justice to them, or rather attempt so to do.

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CON

Albert Joseph Brown

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROWN:

Hon. members have all been singing the praises of their respective constituencies. In the constituency of Lisgar we have a resort that is recognized by both political parties as the finest in Manitoba or, indeed, in the west. In 1925, when Right Hon. Arthur Meighen was aspiring to become prime minister and was touring t'he country, his party chose Rock lake as a place to give a great demonstration, and it was truly a magnificent crowd that assembled there to hear the right hon. gentleman. Similarly when my right hon. leader (Mr. Mackenzie King) toured Manitoba and the west a short time ago, the Liberal party chose Rock lake as the most suitable place for the clans to come together to welcome their chief. So we have the endorsation of both political parties that Rock lake is the finest spot in Manitoba.

I think it would be very desirable that a Small portion of this appropriation or some other money should be spent on building just a few miles of highway to make a better connection between that beautiful summer resort and the country to the south. That would attract large numbers of tourists from the south. As I have said, we have the endorsation of both political parties that Rock lake is the one point at which they can best show their appreciation of their respective leaders.

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LIB

Eugène Fiset

Liberal

Sir EUGENE FISET:

I am surprised, as I listen to all the boasting about the beauties of the maritime provinces and western Canada, that everybody seems to have forgotten that when one goes down to the maritimes, one must go through the beautiful province of Quebec. The loveliness of the south shore of the St. Lawrence, especially between Quebec and the maritime provinces, is unequalled in -Canada. I appeal to the Minister of Railways, who travelled last year through this famous gardqn that we call the Gaspe peninsula, and I ask hon. members when going down to the maritime provinces to stop on the way at Rimouski, where they will be well received.

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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

There is one practical suggestion I should like to make to the minister which has not so far been offered. The minister in his opening address I think said that when the bureau was sending out pictures and advertising matter, the pictures would be sent out without the provinces being specifically mentioned on them. For instance, if pictures of mountains or lakes are used, those pictures would not inform the public where the particular spots are. Speaking from a little experience I know the people of the United

Supply-Railways-Tourists

States are not as discerning as we are in this country. A car may enter the republic from any province and the people there will simply say: "Oh, there is a Canadian car," irrespective of what province it may come from. I do not know whether we are better educated in this country, but I know that when American cars come here we observe what state they come from. I would thereforce suggest to the minister that in the pictures and photographs that go out it would be well that the provinces in which the places shown are situated should be mentioned, so that tourists may know where to find that beautiful scenery. I shall not take any more time talking about British Columbia, but if material for the proposed advertising is to be culled from Hansard I would just say that if any visitor comes to Canada and fails to see British Columbia his visit has been in vain.

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LAB

Abraham Albert Heaps

Labour

Mr. HEAPS:

So much has been said about the beauties of the various provinces that I do not wish to add anything on that aspect of the matter, because other members know a good deal more about it than I do. Yet there are many beautiful parts in Manitoba, and not the least of our beauties is the Red river, and the Red river flows through North Winnipeg. But it is not now the beauty spot it once was; in fact the Red river to-day in the neighbourhood of Winnipeg has become more or less a plague spot that people try to get away from. So I have a suggestion to make to the government which I hope they will not only take into serious consideration but on which they will act in the very near future. The Red river has been polluted with sewage both in the United States and in Canada. At the present time Winnipeg and neighbouring municipalities have made a request to the government for assistance in providing sewage disposal works. I raise the question because I should like to be able to say for the Red river what others have been saying for their various constituencies. I should like the tourist bureau in getting out literature concerning Winnipeg and the adjoining districts to be able to show the Red river as one of its beauty spots, but before that can be, something must be done in regard to scientific and up to date sewage disposal. I suggest to the acting Prime Minister, who is now discussing the matter with the Minister of Railways, that prompt action be taken by the federal government in the way of assistance to the province of Manitoba to restore the attractions of the Red river.

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?

Clarence Joseph Veniot

Mr. YENIOT:

I do not want to take up much of the time of the committee, but I have listened to everyone praising his own

province and merely want to say that there is no need of singing the praises of New Brunswick; its beauties are too well known. I merely call the attention of the committee to two things which we possess in New Brunswick which are not found elsewhere, namely the reversing falls at Saint John and the heavy rush of water in the Petitcodiac river creating wihat is known as the Moncton bore. That is all I want to say.

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CON

Follin Horace Pickel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PICKEL:

Before this vote carries I should like to say a word on behalf of the eastern townships of the province of Quebec. I do not need to say much, but I would draw attention to the fact that it is one of the finest scenic areas in the whole dominion and has natural attractions unsurpassed anywhere. It is a region of rivers, lakes and mountains galore. I know of one mountain 2,900 feet high from which I can view twenty-one small lakes, all teeming with fish, mostly trout. Of course they are not as large as they catch in some parts of the lower provinces or in British Columbia, but that does not seem to make much difference to the ordinary fisherman. As a general rule the ordinary fisherman is as much interested in what he takes with him and his surroundings when fishing as in what he catches, and I may say that remark is not confined to liquid refreshments.

It seems that this appropriation is about half what it should be, if all the requisitions of hon. members who have spoken are to be met.

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CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

I just want to remind the committee that I have the privilege of representing the Garden of Eden in the county of Pictou.

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LIB
CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

She is there too and we

also still use the original language of the garden of Eden. So we have a history of at least six thousand years of close association with the early times of the race. No one could find a better place ini all Canada in which to spend a summer holiday, particularly in view of the reductions in excise and the reduction of customs duty on West India rum of which we have heard this afternoon.

At six o'clock the Speaker resumed the chair and the house took recess.

After Recess

The house resumed at eight o'clocl. PRIVATE BILLS

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CANADIAN MARCONI COMPANY


Mr. F. W. TURNBULL (Regina, for Mr. Sullivan) moved the second reading of Bill Railway Act-Rates on Grain


March 22, 1935