March 22, 1935


The Budget-Mr. Rhodes 199d 199e 208a 232e 247a 281a 362b 384 Cigarette papers, gummed or not, in tubes, booklets or packets Caps or hoods of paper, for use exclusively in protecting young plants in field or garden Chloride of lime and hypochlorite of lime:- 1. When in packages of not less than twenty-five pounds weight each per one hundred pounds Cereal or starch products which require only to be ground in order to form, when mixed with cold water, an adhesive paste per pound Dry red lead; orange mineral; antimony oxide, titanium oxide, and zinc oxide such as zinc white and lithopone; white pigments containing not less than 14 per cent by weight of titanium Artists' and school children's colours, n.o.p., in tubes, cakes, pans and pastels, for painting in oils, water colours or pastels, under regulations prescribed by the Minister British gum, and dextrine, dry Fire brick, n.o.p., for use exclusively in the construction or repair of a furnace, kiln, or other equipment of a manufacturing establishment Glass demijohns or carboys, bottles, n.o.p., decanters, flasks, phials, glass jars and glass balls, lamp chimneys, glass shades or globes; cut, pressed, moulded or crystal glass tableware, decorated or not; blown glass tableware and other cut glass ware Toilet articles of all kinds, including atomizers, brushes, buffers, button hooks, combs, cuticle knives, hair receivers, hand-mirrors, jewel boxes, manicure scissors, nail files, perfume bottles, puff jars, shoe horns, trays and tweezers, of which the manufactured component material of chief value is sterling silver (d) With chequer, diamond or other raised pattern on contact surface Skelp, of iron or steel, hot rolled, when imported by manufacturers of pipes and tubes for use exclusively in the manufacture of pipes and tubes, in their own factories, under regulations prescribed by the Minister: (a) Not more than 14 inches in width (b) More than 14 inches in width 17J P-c. Free Free 3/5 ct. Free Free 5 p.c. Free 15 p.c. 171 P-c. Free Free Free 321 p.c. Free 15 cts. 11 eta. 15 p.c. 271 p.c. 7§ p.c. 121 p.c. 30 p.c. 371 p.c.



5 p.c. 5 p.c. 35 p.c. Free 15 eta. 2 eta. 15 p.c. 30 p.c. 10 p.c. 15 p.c. 32} p.c. 45 p.c.



5 p.c. 5 p.c. 22} p.c. 22} p.c. 10 eta. 15 p.c. Free 15 p.c. 20 p.c. 5 p.c. 10 p.c. 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 17} p.c. 22} p.c. 20 p.c. 20 p.c. 10 p.c. Free Free



Free Free 32} p.c. 32} p.c. 15 Ct8. 25 p.c. 15 p.c. 20 p.c. 27} p.c. 7j p.c. 121 P-C- 30 p.c. 371 P-c. 30 p.c. 30 p.c. 271 P-c-40 p.c. 35 p.c. 30 p.c. 30 p.c.



5 p.c. 5 p.c. 35 p.c. 35 p.c. 15 eta. 25 p.c. 15 p .o. 221 P-c. 30 p.c. 10 p.c. 15 p.c. 321 p.c. 45 p.c. 40 p.c. 35 p.c. 30 p.c. 40 p.c. 35 p.c. 30 p.c. 30 p.c.



5 p.c. 5 p.c. g ► to o w The Budget-Mr. Rhodes fMr. Rhodes.] Tariff Item 386 The Governor in Council may by Order in Council direct that there be substituted for tariff item 384 in Schedule A of the Customs Tariff, and the several rates of duties of Customs set opposite said item in Schedule A, the following Skelp, of iron or steel, hot rolled, when imported by manufacturers of pipes and tubes for use exclusively in the manufacture of pipes and tubes, in their own factories, under regulations prescribed by the Minister: (a) Not more than 14 inches in width___ (b) More than 14 inches in width From and after the publication of such Order in Council in the Canada Gazette, tariff item 384 as it appears in said Schedule at the time of the passing of this Act shall be repealed and the provisions of the said tariff item as it appears in the last preceding subsection of this section shall be substituted therefor. The Governor in Council shall not direct that such provisions be substituted as aforesaid unless and until the Governor in Council is satisfied that skelp of iron or steel, hot rolled, is manufactured in substantial quantities in Canada from iron or steel made in Canada. (k) Sheets, hot or cold rolled, when imported by manufacturers of hollow-ware coated with vitreous enamel or of apparatus designed for cooking or for heating buildings, for use exclusively in the manufacture of hollow-ware coated with vitreous enamel or of vitreous-enamelled sheets for apparatus designed for cooking or for heating buildings (r) Strip, cold rolled, when imported by manufacturers of pipes and tubes, for use exclusively in the manufacture of pipes and tubes, in their own factories, under regulations prescribed by the Minister Iron or steel angles, beams, channels, columns, girders, joists, tees, zees and other shapes or sections, not punched, drilled or further manufactured than hot rolled, weighing not less than 35 pounds per lineal yard, n.o.p.; piling of iron or steel, not punched or drilled, weighing not less than 35 pounds per lineal yard, including interlocking sections, if any, used therewith, n.o.p per ton British Preferential Tariff Inter- mediate Tariff General Tariff Present Rates B.P. Tariff Intermediate Tariff General Tariff5 p.c. 10 p.c. 121 p.c. 5 p.c. 10 p.c. 121 P-O.5 p.c. 10 p.c. 121 P-o. 5 p.c. 10 p.c. 121 p.c.Free 10 p.c. 121 P-c. Free 10 p.c. 121 P-c-71 p.c. 20 p.c. 20 p.c.Free 5 p.c. 5 p.c. Free 5 p.c. 5 p.c.Free $3.00 $3.00 Free $3.00 $3.0025 p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c. o



g g o 02 The Budget-Mr. Rhodes 388b Iron or steel angles, beams, channels, columns, girders, joists, tees, zees and other shapes or sections, not punched, drilled or further manufactured than hot rolled, n.o.p.; piling of iron or steel, not punched or drilled, including interlocking sections, if any, used therewith, n.o.p per ton



407a 410o 413a 424a 427d 428e 428f Piston ring castings of steel, in the rough as from the moulds _____ (d) Coated with zinc or spelter, curved or not, in coils, -144, -104, or -092 inch in diameter, with tolerance not to exceed -004 inch, and not for use in telegraph or telephone lines, n.o.p Wire of iron or steel, coated with zinc or spelter, curved or not, in coils, not more than -144 inch and not less than '080 inch in diameter, with tolerance not to exceed -004 inch, when imported by manufacturers of barbed fencing wire or of wire fencing for use exclusively in the manufacture of barbed fencing wire or of wire fencing, in their own factories Silent chain and finished roller chain, of iron or steel, and complete parts thereof, of a class or kind not made in Canada, n.o.p., either chain of the type which operates over gears or sprockets with machine-cut teeth Chains, of iron or steel, n.o.p., and complete parts _thereof (ii) Chock release apparatus, for use in coal mines to facilitate the safe removal of chocks forming the roof support Machinery, of a class or kind not manufactured in Canada, and complete parts thereof, for use in the manufacture of nets or netting for the fisheries, when imported by manufacturers for use exclusively in the making of such nets or netting, in their own factories, but not for use in making nets or netting commonly used for sportsmen's purposes Fire engines and other fire extinguishing machines and complete parts thereof Hand fire extinguishers, and sprinkler heads for automatic sprinkler systems for fire protection.... Machines designed for making rigid composite box-ends of wood-consisting of a centre with separate nailing edges attached-from scrap or waste mill stock, and complete parts thereof, not to include motive power Diesel and semi-diesel engines, and complete parts thereof, n.o.p Air-cooled internal combustion engines of not greater than 1J h.p. rating, and complete parts thereof. Locomotives and motor cars for use on railways, and tops, wheels and bodies for the same, n.o.p.; chassis for locomotives, n.o.p Free Free Free Free 20 p.c. Free Free 10 p.c. 22$ p.c. Free Free Free 15 p.c. $7.00 25 p.c. 10 p.c. 10 p.c. 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 10 p.c. 5 p.c. 30 p.c. 30 p.c. 27J p.c. 25 p.c. 25 p.c. 30 p.c. $7.00 $4.00 $7.00 $7.0025 p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c.27} p.o 15 p.c. 25 p.c. 27} p.c.10 p.c. Free 10 p.c. 10 p.c.10 p.c. 10 p.c. 20 p.c. 20 p.c.25 p.c. Free 20 p.o. 25 p.c.35 p.c. 15 p.c. 27} p.c. 35 p.c.20 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c.15 p.c. 27} p.c. 35 p.c.10 p.c. 15 p.c. 27\ p.c. 35 p.c.10 p.c. Free 5 p.c. 10 p.c.35 p.c. 22} p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c.35 p.c. 22} p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c.35 p.c. 15 p.c. 27$ p.c. 35 p.c.30 p.c. 15 p.c. 25 p.c. 30 p.c.30 p.c. 15 p.o. 25 p.c. 30 p.c.35 p.c. 15 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c. *3 to -i & >* o a-



Co g g § n & Tariff Item British Preferential Tariff Inter- mediate Tariff General Tariff Present Rates B.P. Tariff Intermediate Tariff General Tariff434a Chassis for motor cars for use on railways, and ; : * [complete parts thereof, n.o.p Free 30 p.c. 35 p.c. 15 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c.434b 435 Pressed steel wheels for use on railway rolling stock.. Locomotives and motor cars for railways, of a class or kind not made in Canada, for use exclusively in 71 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c. 15 p.c. 15 p.c. 30 p.c. 27* p.c. 35 p.c. 30 p.c.438f mining or metallurgical operations Motor omnibuses for conveying passengers only, having seating capacity for not less than ten persons, and chassis for same; chassis for electric (track- Free 15 p.c. 20 p.c. 10 p.c. 15 p.c. 20 p.c.4401 less) trolley-buses, and complete parts thereof Aircraft and complete parts thereof, not including engines, under regulations prescribed by the Min- Free 30 p.c. 40 p.c. Free 15 p.c. 30 p.c. 271 P-c. 40 p.c. 30 p.c.451 j ister Buckles, clasps, eyelets, hooks and eyes, dome, snap or other fasteners of iron, steel, brass or other Free 25 p.c. 271 P-c. 10 p.c. 25 p.c. 271 P-c.metal, coated or not, n.o.p. (not being jewellery).... 20 p.c. 271 p.c. 30 p.c. 20 p.c. 271 P-c. 30 p.c.451 e 475b Slide or hookless fasteners Matrices for stereotypes, electrotypes and celluloids 30 p.c. 371 P-c- 40 p.c. 20 p.c. 271 P-c. 30 p.c.506b described in item 475a per square inch Wooden doors of a height and width not less than 6 Free 1 ct. 1 ct. } ct. 1 ct. 1 ct.522d feet and 2 feet, respectively Yarns and warps wholly of cotton, mercerized, number forty and finer, imported, under regulations prescribed by the Minister, for sale to manufacturers, to be further manufactured in their own fac- Free 221 P-c. 25 p.c. 171 P-c. 221 P-c. 25 p.c.530 i tories Lace and embroideries, wholly of cotton, coloured, imported by manufacturers for use exclusively in Free 25 p.c. 25 p.c. Free 25 p.c. 25 p.c.the manufacture of clothing in their own factories.. 71 p.e. 171 P-c. 30 p.c. 4 cts. 20 p.c. 2 cts. 271 p.c. 31 cts. 30 p.c. 4 cts.542b 546 Linen fire-hose, lined or unlined. Articles made from fabrics, finished or unfinished, and all textile manufactures, wholly of jute, n.o.p.; fabrics wholly of jute, coated or impregnated, and 25 p.c. 321 P-c. 35 p.c. 30 p.c. 321 P-c. 35 p.c.jute fabric backed with paper 121 P-c. 25 p.c. 30 p.c. 121 P-c. 25 p.c. 3 cts. 25 p.c. 30 p.c. and per pound 31 cts. 30 p.c. 35 p.c. 4 cts.547 554b Bags or sacks of hemp, linen or jute Woven fabrics composed wholly or in part of yarns of 15 p.c. 171 p.c. 20 p.c. 15 p.c. 171 P-c. 20 p.c.wool or hair, n.o.p 271 p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c. 271 p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c.and per pound Provided, however, that the sum of the specific and ad valorem duties imposed by this item on 17 cts. 30 cts. 35 cts. 18i cts. 30 cts. 35 cts. to



o 00 The Budget-Mr. Rhodes 556a 556b 571a imports under the British Preferential Tariff shall not be in excess of 65 cents per pound. Melton cloth, imported by manufacturers of tennis balls for use in the manufacture of tennis balls, in their own factories and per pound Slipper cloth, woven, napped on one or both sides, wholly or in part of wool, not to contain silk or artificial silk, weighing not less than 22 ounces per square yard, when imported by manufacturers of indoor footwear, to be used exclusively in the manufacture of such articles in their own factories.. and per pound Carpeting, rugs, mats and matting of cocoa fibre__ Free Free 30 p.c. 35 p.c. 30 cts. 35 p.c. 30 cts. 37$ p.c. 598 609 624a 650a Oriental and imitation Oriental rugs or carpets; carpeting, carpets and rugs, n.o.p.:- Calif valued at less than two dollars per square yard and per square foot (b) If valued at two dollars or more per square yard and per square foot Brass band instruments, n.o.p.; parts of pianofortes and parts of organs Fur skins, wholly or partially dressed, n.o.p Provided, that the duty on hare or rabbit skins, under the Intermediate or General Tariff, shall be not less than per dozen skins Belting, of leather Bases or salts of thorium or of cerium, not including natural minerals, for use in the manufacture of incandescent gas mantles, when imported by manufacturers of such mantles or of Btockings for such mantles (i) Dolls; toys of all kinds, n.o.p (ii) Mechanical toys of metal (iii) Juvenile construction sets of metal, consisting of various stampings, punched, and connections therefor: parts of the foregoing Button blanks of animal shell, in the rough Fish hooks, for deep-sea or lake fishing, not smaller in size than number 2-0; fishing nets and nettings of all kinds; threads, twines, marlines, fishing lines, rope and cordage of cotton, hemp, manila or other vegetable fibre, not exceeding one and one-half inches in circumference, to be used for fishing purposes or for the construction or repair of fishing nets; the foregoing not to include such articles used for 30 p.c. 3 cts. 30 p.c. 5 cts. Free 10 p.c. 10 p.c. Free 20 p.c. 10 p.c. Free Free 35 p.c. 15 cts. 35 p.c. 15 cts. 22$ p.c. 15 p.c. 72 cts. 30 p.c. Free 30 p.c. 30 p.c. 30 p.c. Free 40 p.c. 27J P-c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c.35 cts. 18} cts. 30 cts. 35 cts.40 p.c. 27} p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c.35 cts. 18} cts. 30 cts. 35 cts.40 p.c. 15 p.c. 22} p.c. 25 p.c.but no t less than, per s q. ft.10 cts. i 10 cts. 10 cts.40 p.c. 30 p.c. 1 35 p.c. 40 p.c.20 cts. 5 cts. 15 cts. 20 cts.40 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c. 40 p.c.20 cts. 5 cts. 15 cts. 20 cts.25 p.c. 15 p.c. 22} p.c. 25 p.c.15 p.c. 10 p.c. 15 p.c. 15 p.c.72 cts. 35 p.c. 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c.Free r ! Free Free Free15 p.c. 20 p.c. 22} p.c.40 p.c. 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 40 p.c.40 p.c. 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 40 p.c.40 p.c. t 20 p.c. 30 p.c. 40 p.c.10 p.c. Free 10 p.c. 10 p.c. g > ts o a



& to The Budget-Mr. Rhodes [Mr. Rhodes.l British Preferential Tariff Inter- mediate Tariff General Tariff Present Rates Item B.P. Tariff Intermediate Tariff General Tariffsportsmen's purposes, and to be subject to such regulations as the Minister may prescribe Free Free Free Free Free Free691 Communion sets of metal, glass, wood or other material; oil stocks; crosiers; benitier and sprinkler; incenser and incense boat; baptismal shells and fonts Free Free Free 20 p.c. Free 22$ p.c. Free 25 p.c. Free696 Philosophical and scientific apparatus, utensils, instruments, and preparations, including boxes and bottles containing the same; maps, photographic reproductions, casts as models, animals as research or experimental subjects, etchings, lithographic prints or charts; mechanical equipment of a class or kind not made in Canada. All articles in this item, when for the use and by order of any society or institution incorporated or established solely for religious, philosophical, educational, scientific or literary purposes, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for the use and by order of any public hospital, college, academy, school, or seminary of learning in Canada, and not for sale, under regulations prescribed by the Minister Free Free Free 30 p.c. 20 p.c. Free 37$ p.c. 30 p.c. Free 45 p.c. 32$ p.c. Free783 Internal combustion and steam engines, transmission assemblies, magnetos, starting motors, electric generators, propeller shafts, steel chassis frames, brakes, clutches, brake and clutch controls, steel road wheels, steel rims for pneumatic tires, larger than thirty inches by five inches, steering gears and front and rear axles, and complete parts of all the foregoing, all of a class or kind not made in Canada, when imported by manufacturers of motor trucks with standard equipment (not for use on railways or tramways), not to'include machines or other articles mounted thereon or attached thereto for purposes other than for loading or unloading the truck, for use only in the manufacture of such motor trucks Free 17$ p.c. 20 p.c. Free 17$ p.c. 20 p.c.15 p.c. 15 p.c. 25 p.c. 27£ p.c. 30 p.c. 35 p.c. o o



o



?Ae Budget-Mr. Rhodes The Budget-Mr. Rhodes 6. Resolved, that Schedule B to the Customs Tariff, being chapter forty-four of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, be amended by striking thereout Tariff Items 1044 and 1049, the enumerations of goods and the rates of drawback of Customs Duties set opposite to each of the said items, and by inserting the following items, enumerations and rates of drawback of Customs Duties in said Schedule B:- Item No. 1039 1049 Goods When Subject to Drawback Rolled round wire rods in the coil, of iron or steel, not over -375 inch in diameter. When used in the manufacture of wire of iron or steel, coated with zinc or spelter, curved or not, in coils, not more than [DOT]144 inch and not less than -080 inch in diameter, with tolerance not to exceed -004 inch, when such wire is used by manufacturers of barbed fencing wire or of wire fencing for use exclusively in the manufacture of barbed fencing wire or of wire fencing, in their own factories Cotton velveteen and cotton-back silk-pile velvet. When imported under the British Preferential Tariff and used exclusively in the manufacture of fancy boxes or cases When used by manufacturers of iron or steel in the construction or repair of a blast furnace, open hearth furnace or rolling mill furnace Bituminous coal, imported on or after March 23rd, 1935. (a) When converted into coke and the coke sold for use as fuel in other than (b) When converted into coke and the coke sold for use as fuel in other than a coke or gas plant; provided that not less than thirty-five per centum, by weight, of the bituminous coal so used, as covered by each drawback claim, was mined in Canada Provided that drawback payable under this Item is in lieu of drawback payable under any other item. Portion of Duty (not including Special Duty or Dumping Duty) Payable as Drawback 99 p.c. 99 p.e. 99 p.c. 50 p.c. 99 p.c. 7. Resolved, That Schedule C to the Customs Tariff Item 1212 and by substituting therefor Tariff, as amended by chapter thirty-two of the the following: Acts of 1934, be amended by striking thereout 1212 Aigrettes, egret plumes or so-called osprey plumes, and the feathers, quills, heads, wings, tails, skins, or parts of skins of wild birds either raw or manufactured; but this provision shall not apply to:- (a) the feathers or plumes of ostriches; (b) the plumage of the English pheasant and the Indian peacock; the plumage of wild birds of groups recognized as game birds in any Canadian game law, and for which an open season is provided thereunder; (c) the plumage of birds imported alive; nor to- (d) specimens imported under regulations of the Minister for any Natural History or other museum or for scientific or educational purposes. 8. Resolved, That any enactment founded upon the foregoing resolutions to amend the Customs Tariff or Schedules thereto shall be deemed to have come into force on the twenty-third day of March, one thousand nine hundred and thirty-five, and to have applied to all goods mentioned in the foregoing resolutions imported or taken out of warehouse for consumption on and after that date, and to have applied to goods previously imported for which no entry for consumption was made before that date. On motion of Mr. Ralston the debate was adjourned.


DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS


The house in committee of supply, Mr. Morand in the chair. To assist in promoting tourist business in Canada, $200,000.


CON

Finlay MacDonald

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacDONALD (Cape Breton South):

Mr. Chairman, when the committee rose last evening I was speaking about the attraction offered by the fisheries of the maritime prov-

Supply-Railways-Tourists

inces, and I called attention to the different species of fish in those waters. Some people may have doubts as to the accuracy of my statements, because they have never contemplated fish six or eight feet in length which afford sport to the sportsman. For the information of the committee I shall read from a pamphlet entitled "Deep Sea Fighters."

Try to imagine an attempt to conquer, by means of a rod and line, the biggest and most determined bull that ever came out of the wild west. Add to this picture, flying spray and the swift manoeuvres of a motor launch on a heaving sea, and you have some vague idea ot the thrills of this grand game. It's the finest sport the sea offers, a royal pastime!

These silvery torpedoes of the deep have true fighters' hearts. They never quit while there is strength in their tremendous stream-lined bodies. The greatest battlers of the tuna tribe, however, are the ones found in Nova Scotia waters. Nowhere else in the world are the tuna as large or as game, and every record breaking specimen in twenty-eight years-with the exception of one lone fish-has been taken in the coastal waters of Nova Scotia.

These tuna are big league fish for the most experienced sportsmen in the world and that is why each year sees an increasing number of anglers coming to Nova Scotia in hope of a record capture. Zane Grey, the famous novelist, had a grand battle in Nova Scotian waters off Liverpool with the 758-pound giant he conquered, and he has declared frequently that this adventure was the finest sport in the world.

Many times it is the quarry which is declared winner. Commander J. K. L. Ross, of Montreal, hooked a giant tuna in St. Ann bay, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. It was 11 o'clock, on Saturday morning, and the battle began with terriffic rushes and mighty leaps that tested nerve and tackle. All the afternoon the fight went on. The tuna would tow the boat for miles, then would sound again and'again, until it seemed that the line must yield. But, at the last second, up he would come in a magnificent surge of foam and silver, and Ross would have new hope. Darkness fell but the battle went on. Ross was determined, and' so was the big fish. When daylight came it was the man who was tiring, not the tuna, and the renewed skirmishes became so exhausting that at 6 a.m. Ross was compelled to cut the line and admit defeat.

Thomas Howell, veteran Chicago sportsman, hooked a tuna off Liverpool, Nova Scotia, at eleven o'clock Monday morning. August 6, 1934. The giant fish was a fighter of the finest calibre and towed the big fishing launch exactly sixty-two hours. The great battler weighed 792 pounds, and was over nine feet in length.

That, Mr. Chairman, gives you some idea of the character of the sport that is afforded in the waters of Nova Scotia. But in addition to the tuna there , is another large fish known as the swordfish, and the Nova Scotia swordfish are comparable only to Nova Scotia tuna as supreme gladiators of the sea:

They are considered by many the greatest battlers, of the deep and the very elite of their kind. These are the Broadbill, or true sword-

fish. They are rarer and much larger and fiercer than the marlin or Roundbill swordfish found in southern waters. They have the upper jaw prolonged into a two-edged swordlike weapon and know well how to use it.

I need not continue along that line because I think I have already given sufficient to excite the curiosity of the committee as to the attractions we have to offer to the true sportsman, the big league sportsman who is looking for thrills in this particular sport.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS
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LIB
CON

Finlay MacDonald

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacDONALD (Cape Breton):

This fish that Commander Ross caught was found in St. Ann's bay in the county of Victoria. That is the spot that I mentioned at the last meeting of the committee, where rest the bones of the famous giant McAskill. His grave is found there and also some specimens of the clothing and shoes that he wore. A biography of this giant has been written by a literary gentleman down there, named James Gillis, which I take pleasure in recommending to every lover of literature, and I might add that I envy them the pleasure they will have in reading that piece of contemporary literature.

On the harbour of St. Ann's are algo to be found many evidences of the French occupation before the taking of Louisburg. Another event of historic interest was the great exodus of Presbyterians that took place from St. Ann's about a hundred years ago. To the village of St. Ann's about a century ago came a Presbyterian minister named MacLeod from Pictou, and with him he brought his whole congregation. He was in many respects a wonderful man, and the stories that still are told show him to have been a man of the most determined and forceful character-a great preacher, a great teacher, a law giver, and an autocrat, as my hon. friend from Pictou (Mr. Cantley) suggests. But autocrats were necessary in those days just as they are now sometimes. This man left his imprint on the character of all the people in that district. If there is anything good in Presbyterianism, and I am not saying that there is not, I venture to say that this man exemplified it in his life and in his preaching.

When referring last night to the village of Louisburg I forgot one very interesting thing that is still a subject of conversation among our older people when gathered around the fireplace in the evening, and that is that on certain days as they recall the great battles of the past there may be heard in the stilly silence of the night the tramp of soldiers marching and the thud of hoofs.

Supply-Railways-Tourists

I ask you, Mr. Chairman, where in all Canada is to be found a spot so rich in historic incident as you will find right at St. Ann's in the county of Cape Breton? In the county of Cape Breton we have also the coal mines of the Dominion Coal Company, very large mines which contribute greatly to the revenue of the province of Nova Scotia, and in the city of Sydney are established the steel works. Tourists who are industrially minded have here an opportunity of seeing some of our advanced industrial methods.

During this coming summer the city of Sydney will celebrate its one hundred and fiftieth anniversary, and to it are being invited notables from all over the old country and from Canada, including the lineal descendants of Governor DeBarre, who laid out the city of Sydney a hundred years ago. We also hope to have with us on that occasion His Excellency the Governor General and men eminent in political and public life in Canada and the United States, as well as warships from almost every nation. I cordially invite the members of this house to be present with us down at Sydney from July 29 to August 4 of this summer.

In answer to my hon. friend from North Renfrew (Mr. Cotnam), who holds out as an inducement to visit his riding the successful efforts of the smugglers, I may say that in spite of the budget we have heard delivered this afternoon we hope that the activities of the smuggler will not be curtailed to such an extent off the coast of Nova Scotia as to deprive us of necessary stimulant.

Nova Scotia is doing its share to secure a tourist business. We have now three or four tourist bureaux operating throughout the province, all bending their efforts to induce tourists to come to the province. In addition to the program for this summer that I have already mentioned we are also preparing to receive the Olympic and three other ocean liners and several men of war this summer. We are also furthering plans for a meeting of the Maritime Aquatic Association which is holding a competition in Nova Scotia this year. We expect that more tourists will visit Nova Scotia this summer than ever before. I hope hon. members will not think that what I have said is overdrawn. I hope they will come to see for themselves, and when they do I am satisfied that they will give me universal approbation as being the most veracious member of the house.

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PC

Errick French Willis

Progressive Conservative

Mr. WILLIS:

Mr. Chairman, I do not intend to refer to the beauties of Nova Scotia, which are very well known, but I do intend 92582-127*

to refer to beauties which are not so well known and which perhaps need some advertising. I have in mind the Turtle Mountain forest reserve which is located in my constituency and within which is the International Peace Garden of America. This peace garden is situated partly in the American state of North Dakota and partly in the province of Manitoba, and is the only peace garden on the continent. Its site was selected by international representatives who endeavoured to choose the most suitable place on the continent at which to locate an international peace garden. There is a highway running along one side of the garden. In the United States this highway is an all-weather road and it is hoped that this same condition will soon apply to the Canadian portion. Last year more than 8,500 persons entered this port.

I bring up this matter at this time in an effort to interest the government and others in the International Peace Garden. A portion of this vote should be used in an endeavour to attract the tourist trade to this garden. Its site was selected by a committee composed of members of the National Association of Gardeners of America, the largest horticultural association on the continent. Last year a group of 250 men was employed by the federal government of the United States to work in the American portion of the garden. This was possible because of assistance from the federal government which we in Canada have not been able to obtain. This is because of a lack of cooperation between the provincial and dominion governments. I should like to see a work camp established in this area. The Turtle Mountain forest reserve is close to the drought area of the province of Manitoba where the dominion government is spending a considerable amount in the way of relief. If it is not possible to establish a work camp within the garden, it should be established within the Turtle Mountain forest reserve. Reforestation or other work would prove helpful to the people and at the same time act as an attraction to the tourist trade. I think the provincial government should transfer at once the property which it has promised to transfer. I should like to request the minister to see that all maps issued by his department indicate plainly the present location of the International Peace Garden, which demonstrates better than anything else the fact that for one hundred years there has been peace between Canada and the United States. This fact has been brought to the attention of the house by many hon. members, and I trust an effort will be made to establish a work camp, either in the reserve or in the garden, to provide employment and increase

Supply-Railways-Tourists

the attraction to the tourists who come to this area all the way from Mexico city in the south and northern Manitoba in the north.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS
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CON

Harry Bernard Short

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SHORT:

I am pleased indeed that

my colleague, the hon. member for Cape Breton South (Mr. MacDonald), has had something to say about the beauties of Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia is the greatest tourist province in the dominion, and I was afraid it was going to be left out of things. I was not present when this discussion first started or I would have had a word to say at that time. Nova Scotia has been catering to the tourist trade for a longer period than any other province-upwards of fifty years- and I think it is the best equipped of all provinces in the way of hotels to cater to summer visitors. We have as much as or perhaps more than any other province in the way of scenery and amusements, and I feel I should be remiss in my duty if I did not bring these things to the attention of the house.

The western part of the province is only a night's run from Boston and twenty-two hours from New York by the best class of palatial coastwise steamers. The hon. member for Cape Breton South has referred to the tuna and swordfish fishing, but in addition there are the salmon trout fisheries, the finest in the country. We have also the finest scenery in the dominion. Unfortunately we have not paved roads to offer the tourists, but we hope to have them in the near future. I am pleased that an appropriation is being made this year to provide for the advertising of the beauties of this country. Canada as a whole is a beautiful country but the greatest beauty is to be found in the maritimes, particularly in Nova Scotia.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS
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March 22, 1935