March 21, 1935

CON

Edward Armour Peck

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PECK:

I would not consider it necessary to speak but for the fact that the people I represent are very much interested in the tourist traffic. The county of Peterborough offers a great deal of attraction to tourists who come by thousands to enjoy the scenery. We are able to give them and we do give them a very pleasant time and they come again. I agree with my hon. friend from East Simcoe as to the attractiveness of that general system that runs from Georgian bay to the Trent, known as the Kawartha system, comprising islands, lakes, rivers and canals. It attracts many thousands of people to its shores every year and those whom I represent are particularly interested in promoting the traffic. Other places in Canada are similarly situated and are looking for tourists. I am quite sure therefore that the government is doing the wise thing in setting aside a sum of money to advertise the traffic and to make provision for tourists to see that they are properly guarded against exorbitant charges. The bureau can do a great deal in furnishing information to the prospective tourist. After all, the best advertisement that Canada can have is the good will of those who visit the country and report favourably upon its advantages. That is the first essential. Further, the bureau should be in a position to give information to those who are ignorant of the country and are anxious to know where they can spend a happy and profitable holiday at reasonable cost. It will be the function of the bureau to collect all this information and to check it over, and it can do many things to smooth the way for the tourist. The tourist wants a reasonable means of approaching the particular point on which he has set his mind; he wants to know that he will be comfortably looked after at moderate cost; he wants to know that fishing is provided for, and he wants to know particularly that he will be able to get into ready communication with his own home by mail, telegraph or telephone. A good many inquiries are made respecting the district I come from with regard to these points particularly which I have enumerated, and the officer in charge of the bureau can do a good deal in cooperation with the various departments to clear up such points. Every man coming to visit us wants to know, as I have said, that he will be able to get into ready communication with his home in case of emergency. From every point of view therefore we can commend this appropriation and I congratulate the government. I assure them it will do a great deal to improve the tourist traffic and increase the numbers of those who visit us.

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UFA

Henry Elvins Spencer

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. SPENCER:

Before the house rose a few days ago I mentioned the great buffalo park situated between Wainwright and Har-disty in Alberta. There are a few particulars which I wish to put on record with regard to this park, which has the reputation of being the largest buffalo park with the largest herd of buffalo in the world. The park is situated on the main line of the Canadian National railways, 127 miles east of Edmonton and 199 miles west of Saskatoon. It has an area of 125,000 acres. The buffalo were first introduced into the park in 1910, and the locality being exceedingly good for them, and great care having been taken of them, they have increased enormously; from 748 they have increased to 24,000. Various means have been taken to keep the herd within reasonable numbers owing to the limited pasture. In the years from 1925 to 1928 no less than 6,673 were moved north to the Wood Buffalo park in the Great Slave lake region, and during recent years a great number of the older animals have been slaughtered-to be exact, 10,545. We still have approximately 5,000 in t)he park. Besides buffalo we have 1,000 head of elk, 2,500 mule deer, 95 moose and a small herd of yak. There are many interesting crosses between the buffalo, the yak and the domestic, which are of considerable interest to visitors. Last year visitors to the park numbered 12,631. The park is surrounded by a high wire fence, nine feet high, stretching for over one hundred miles. I am glad to say that we have at Wainwright Park a very able administrator in Mr. Smith, who goes to a great deal of trouble to give every consideration to visitors. I want to put these facts on record because I think the parks should be advertised more extensively. I believe that the money being spent by the government in advertising these different parks is all to the good. Apart from the park there is another attraction in the Wainwright area, where we have the second largest oil field in Canada, so that if people get tired looking at the buffalo they can look at possible investments in this important oil field.

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CON

Finlay MacDonald

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MacDONALD (Cape Breton):

There has been such unanimity with regard to this appropriation that I hesitate to take up the time of the committee, but it would be most unusual and neglectful if on such a discussion as this the province of Nova Scotia were 'overlooked. That province is the playground of the Atlantic, and the constituency which I have the honour to represent is from the tourist standpoint the chief asset of that province. In addition to the attractions that should be held out to tourists

Supply-Railways-Tourists

and that have been mentioned by the minister and also by the hon. member for East Simcoe; in addition to the courtesy, kindness and hospitality that should be shown to tourists, there should be attractions in the shape of good roads, hotels and tourist camps which also should be developed.

The hon. member for East Simcoe in his very worthy address referred to the historic aspects of his constituency. Well, the tourist that comes to Nova Scotia in nine cases out of ten wishes to see the one historic point in Canada that is probably more important than any other, and that is the old town of Louisburg. They read about it in their schoolbooks many years ago, and as the years went on their interest no doubt grew. Perhaps as they took a deeper interest in Canadian history they got a better view and a keener realization of the importance of the fall of Louisburg in 1758. At that time Louisburg was the key to the gulf of St. Lawrence; the taking of that town meant the taking of the French citadel on the Atlantic coast. The following year the British were enabled to make Louisburg a strategic point from which to take Quebec. Had it not been for the capture of Louisburg in 1758, it would have been very difficult if not impossible to take Quebec the following year, and thus students of history recognize that in that old town was fought out and probably settled the destiny of Canada and probably of the whole North American continent for all time to come.

I admire the efforts of hon. members who have already spoken in praise of the beauties of their various constituencies, but I wonder what would happen to them and to their point of view if they visited the province of Nova Scotia and the county of Cape Breton There is where the east begins; there is where the sun first kisses the eastern shore of Canada, and I venture to say that in the course of its long journey until it sets in the waters of the Pacific it does not look upon a more beautiful scene than that which greets it at dawn in Nova Scotia.

I wish I could induce some hon. members to visit the island of Cape Breton and take just a short trip around it. The first spot I would take them to would be the village of Margaree, where is possibly the most fertile valley in the eastern provinces. There is to be found the celebrated Margaree river, the paradise of the angler, where salmon and trout abound and where the greatest hospitality is extended to the tourist. The tourist after a few days' visit there goes home

{Mr. F. MacDonald.]

satisfied with the treatment he has received, with the fish he has caught and probably with material enough to furnish conversation for many a long evening. From there I would take him along the celebrated Cabot trail over the tip of Cape North, up the side of a mountain the size of which is such that it makes even the Alps and the Rocky mountains dwindle, and on which cars go in low gear until they reach the top. From that point of vantage you can see in the distance Prince Edward Island, the garden of the gulf, so described by the hon. member for Queens (Mr. Myers) the other day'. Turning your gaze to the right you see the distant shores of Newfoundland, then down the Atlantic coast over the mountain of Smoky is the village of Baddeck, made prominent many years ago by Charles W. Warner, and now the resting place of Alexander Graham Bell, the great inventor, who having travelled over the world picked this spot as one of the most beautiful he had ever seen. It was there that the first aeroplanes flew in the Dominion of Canada, and there opens to the eyes of the public the beauty of the great Bras d'Or lakes. A little further on we come to the village of St. Ann's, the birthplace and resting place of the celebrated giant McAskill.

When hon. members who speak of the attractions of their constituencies refer to fishing such as is afforded by the lakes of Ontario and other small spots, they are speaking simply of minor league fish. If they want to have big league fish they have to come down to Cape Breton island. There we have a fish called the tuna, a member of the horse mackerel family. I might read just one short description of it:

In no other waters of the world are there found so many world champion heavyweight deep sea fighters and few with so abundant a variety of lightweight sport fish. They range along the south shore and off Cape Breton. Nova Scotia tuna-the battling giants of the sea! The biggest thrill awaiting those who find their sport with rod and line! The gamest and most enduring fighters in the ocean are the tuna found in Nova Scotian waters.

Progress reported.

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KINGSTON PENITENTIARY

LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. J. P. HOWDEN (St. Boniface):

I

would] like to ask the government a question in regard to a rather important matter. Have they any information regarding a rumoured revolt and fire at Kingston penitentiary?

Privilege

Mr. Mackenzie King

Right Hon. Sir GEORGE PERLEY (Acting Prime Minister)' Revolt and what?

Topic:   KINGSTON PENITENTIARY
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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

There is a reported rebellion and fire at the Kingston penitentiary, I understand.

Sir GEORiGE PERLEY: I have heard nothing about it, and the Minister of Justice is not here to-night. He will take note of the question.

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At eleven o'clock the house adjourned without question put, pursuant to standing order. Friday, March 22, 1935


March 21, 1935