March 14, 1935

CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice):

These questions can go on the order paper in the ordinary way.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
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LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

Then I will present this

document to the clerk of the house.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
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EX-SERVICE MEN UNEMPLOYED


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Mr. Speaker, with reference to

the order in council just tabled by the Minister of Pensions and National Health (Mr. Sutherland) with regard to the setting up of a committee to investigate the special situation of ex-service men who may be unemployed, may I ask the minister if it is the intention of the administration to submit the report of this committee to the house during the present session?

Topic:   EX-SERVICE MEN UNEMPLOYED
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CON

Donald Matheson Sutherland (Minister of Pensions and National Health)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. D. M. SUTHERLAND (Minister of Pensions and National Health):

Yes, that

is our intention.

Topic:   EX-SERVICE MEN UNEMPLOYED
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PACIFIC HALIBUT FISHERMEN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Olof Hanson

Liberal

Mr. OLOF HANSON (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Weir) what progress has been made with respect to the application of the Pacific coast halibut fishermen to come under the marketing scheme. If they are to come under this scheme, I should like to know if it would be possible to have them brought in before the end of this month as fishing starts on April 1. I am told that they cannot be brought under the scheme but other industries have been taken care of and I should like to have an answer to my question.

Topic:   PACIFIC HALIBUT FISHERMEN
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for

Eight Hour Day

Skeena (Mr. Hanson) was good enough to give me notice of this question. The scheme has been given consideration by the dominion marketing board; has been submitted to the Department of Justice with respect to the legal aspects; certain changes in the scheme have been referred back to the petitioners for their approval and certain other changes, if any are made by the Department of Justice, would have to be referred back to the petitioners for their approval. Copy of the scheme was submitted to the secretary of the United Fishermen's Union of British Columbia to give them an opportunity to make any representations they wish to make. They were given until March 15 to make representations. No opposition to the scheme has yet been received and it is expected the board will deal with the scheme early next week. It has been handled or dealt with in the same way as other schemes submitted.

Topic:   PACIFIC HALIBUT FISHERMEN
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PRICE SPREADS COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the acting leader of the government (Sir George Perley) if the government has received any intimation from the price spreads commission as to when its report will likely be presented?

Topic:   PRICE SPREADS COMMISSION
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CON

George Halsey Perley (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE PERLEY (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I have not heard anything about it.

Topic:   PRICE SPREADS COMMISSION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Might it not be well to inquire so that the house may be informed as to when the report will likely be received?

Topic:   PRICE SPREADS COMMISSION
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CON

George Halsey Perley (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE PERLEY:

I should like to know myself when it is likely to come in. If I get an opportunity I will inquire from the chairman and see whether he can give us any idea when it will come in.

Topic:   PRICE SPREADS COMMISSION
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EIGHT HOUR DAY

BILL TO LIMIT HOURS OF WORK IN INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS


The house resumed from Wednesday, March 13, consideration in committee of Bill No. 21, to provide for limiting the hours of work in industrial undertakings to eight in the day and forty-eight in the week, in accordance with the convention concerning the application of the principle of the eight hour day or of the forty-eight hour week adopted by the general conference of the international labour organization of the League of Nations, (Mr. R. Weir.] in accordance with the labour part of the treaty of Versailles of 28th June, 1019,-Mr. Gordon (for Mr. Bennett)-Mr. Morand in the chair. P. F. CASGRAIN (Charlevoix-Saguenay): Mr. Chairman, I 'have in my hand a letter addressed to the hon. member for St. Hya-cinthe-Rouville (Mr. Fontaine) which I have been asked to read to the house in the absence of the hon.. member. This letter is in connection with the working hours in certain industries such as the canning industry. The letter is dated February 26, 1935, and reads as follows: The convention applies to all industrial undertaking which of course includes all manufacturers. While we approve these regulations for the industry in general, on behalf of the canning industry we feel that certain provisions of these regulations would not work out satisfactorily in our industry, and would cause in some instances very serious hardship to the growers who are furnishing the raw products to our industry, as many factories are located in centres of a small population, and owing to the nature of our business whereas we may have heavy deliveries one day, and light deliveries another day, due to climatic or other conditions, we feel that it is pretty nearly impossible to secure sufficient help to work two shifts in these centres. Also taking in consideration that all produce pertaining to a canning industry is perishable in a great many instances within few hours, therefore it is necessary that this produce be taken care of regardless to the hours we may have to do so, other than this it would be a total loss to the growers. We also had instances where during the rush of the season the rain held farmers from harvesting their crop causing the factory _ to have to close up or work just few hours during that time, and was then necessary for the factory to work long hours to catch up again, or otherwise the grower would loose his crop. Owing to the fact that most canning factories are only a seasonal operation, we feel in this particular respect that there should be some special provisions to work hours necessary to handle farmers crops without any injury to the help. We trust we have made ourselves plain and that you may see your way clear to take this matter belfore the house. Respectfully yours, St. Hyacinthe Canning Factory. (Signed) J. H. Logan. A letter enclosing a copy of this letter was sent to the Prime Minister. I put this letter on record so that these people will have their wish known to the house.


CON

George Gordon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

Topic:   EIGHT HOUR DAY
Subtopic:   BILL TO LIMIT HOURS OF WORK IN INDUSTRIAL UNDERTAKINGS
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March 14, 1935