March 4, 1935

LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

I take the strongest exception to the remarks of the hon. member for East Calgary. I can tell him that many members may make statements in the house, but the statements I have made this evening I can challenge any hon. member, even the minister, to dispute. They were given to me right from the camp. It may well be the remarks I made regarding the medical profession are pinching my hon. friend a little hard. The statement with regard to the Ottawa agreements I will deal with at some other time, but so far they have not been controverted. It is true one member attempted to controvert them and said that I had made a mistake in regard to the question of butter, but it did not affect my argument at all. But the statements I made regarding the economic conference agreements were made from the government record, and as to the statements I made with regard to the camps, I will put my seat in jeopardy along with his if he cares to dispute them. I got my facts directly from the camp. I was told by the man in charge that the price paid for potatoes was $24 a ton, wdiile as I have stated the farmer was getting $5 a ton for grade number one and $3.75 for grade number two. Will he undertake now to say that my statements are wrong?

When I mentioned the price of tobacco the minister took me to task and said that tobacco was provided. Perhaps 1.3 cents is all that is allowed each man, and it may not be allowed in cash, but those statements were taken down by me just a few days before I left for Ottawa and I repeat that they were given to me by the man in charge of the camp, an appointee of the government.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STIRLING:

Perhaps I may be permitted to finish the statement I was endeavouring to make. It is $1.30 per man day.

Death of Armand LaVergne

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
LIB
CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STIRLING:

Yes, I have said that in this we have included everything that we think can properly be included in the relief camp cost.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
LIB
CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STIRLING:

I do not understand my hon. friend's arithmetic, but if he will allow me to continue, perhaps he can clear it up himself. This amount of $1.30 is made up as follows:

Expenditure per man day

Item on relief

Land

0.6 centsProject materials

12.1 centsTransportation

3.1 cents

Accommodation:

(a) Skilled tradesmen

0.8 cents(b) Materials

9.2 centsSubsistence

27.3 centsMedical care

4.8centsAllowances to supervisory staff.. 11.7 centsAllowances to labourers

16.3 centsClothing

16.0 centsTobacco

1.3 centsEquipment and tools

7.1 cents

Maintenance of equipment and

tools 1.4 cents

Ordnance equipment such as bed's, mattresses, diningroom

and kitchen equipment 8.2 cents

Other charges:

(a) Hire of skilled tradesmen 2.6 cents

(b) Miscellaneous

5.8 centsStationery

0.7 centsExpenditures chargeable to projects as a whole

1.0 centsTotal

$1.30

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
LIB
CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STIRLING:

The whole man-days

right through.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
LIB
CON

Grote Stirling (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of National Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STIRLING:

Yes.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

The minister stated a few minutes ago that the care of the single homeless men was very largely a provincial and not a federal responsibility; that therefore any investigation into conditions prevailing in those camps in British Columbia and in other provinces could very well be conducted by the provincial authorities and that the assistance rendered by the minister's department was not in substitution but in aid of provincial relief. I wish to take the most strenuous objection to that statement, because I saw that stated in several telegrams which passed between the

Prime Minister and some of us in Vancouver during the negotiations to which I referred previously. Rightly or wrongly the Department of National Defence and the federal government have assumed in those camps the sole and entire responsibility for the care of those single homeless men. When accusations are made, rightly or wrongly, in regard to malpractices in those camps I suggest to the minister that his immediate duty is not to ask any provincial government to investigate them but to send his own commissioners out to those camps in British Columbia and other provinces and to assume the complete burden of investigation. I am certain, if the minister does that, it will assist him in the future administration of this very difficult problem. The minister and the government are wrong in trying to shelve their obvious responsibilty in regard to those camps. Rightly or wrongly the Department of National Defence assumed complete control over those men and to-day they are charged with entire responsibility for their care. To try to shift the responsibility to the provincial government is an evasion of the responsibility this government must assume and maintain in days to come. I am asking the minister in his own interest to investigate conditions in those camps and I am certain this will help him and his department in the administration of the whole system in future days.

Progress reported.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink

At eleven o'clock the house adjourned without question put, pursuant to standing order. Tuesday, March 5, 1935


March 4, 1935