February 6, 1935

LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

For a copy of the telegram addressed on or about the 15th September, 1934, by Canada and several other countries to the U.S.S.R. inviting it to enter the League of Nations, and of the signatures which were affixed to it.

Topic:   INVITATION TO THE U.S.S.R. TO ENTER LEAGUE OF NATIONS
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RIVIERE-DU-LOUP, QUE.-WHARF

LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

For a copy of all correspondence, letters, reports, plans, concerning the extension to the wharf of Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec, since 1931.

Topic:   RIVIERE-DU-LOUP, QUE.-WHARF
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PUBLIC WORKS, NEW BRUNSWICK

LIB

Joseph Enoil Michaud

Liberal

Mr. MICHAUD:

For a copy of all correspondence, letters, telegrams, and other documents, exchanged between the dominion government or any member or any department thereof and all other persons relating to the following items of schedule "A," chapter 59, 24-25 George V, the Public Works Construction Act: Item 19,

Campbellton. New Brunswick, wharf repairs; item 32, Dalhousie, New Brunswick, post office; item 41. Escuminae, New Brunswick, breakwater extension; item 49, Fredericton experimental farm, New Brunswick, new dormitory; item 75, harbours and rivers (New Brunswick only); item 98, Moncton, New Brunswick, public building.

Beam Traiders

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS, NEW BRUNSWICK
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The hon. gentleman who makes the motion is not in the house. I wish to speak to him in regard to certain requirements.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS, NEW BRUNSWICK
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CON

BEAM TRAWLERS

PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA


Mr. I. 1). MACDOUGALL (Inverness) moved: That, in the opinion of this house, in the interests of the fishermen of Nova Scotia, no permits should be granted or renewed with those who own and operate beam trawlers in the province of Nova Scotia. He said: Mr. Speaker, although I am deeply interested in the subject matter of the motion standing in my name I do not know whether it would be parliamentary for me to proceed with it at the present time, because of the fact that it has been given very close attention by the committee on price spreads and mass buying, and on account of the fact that the question is somewhat controversial. All I desire is to have the question brought to the attention of the select standing committee on marine and fisheries, where I and every other hon. member will have the opportunity to discuss it fully and frankly. Those of us who have given some thought and study to the historical background of the Canadian confederation realize that at the preliminary meeting held at Charlottetown in 1864, when the province of Nova Scotia was asked to join the Canadian union it was made a sine qua non by Sir John A. Macdonald that the control of the fisheries of the province should be vested in the central or federal power. That may or may not be generally known by hon. members, but it is a fact. That was strenuously opposed by Sir Charles Tupper of Cumberland, who did not desire to have the control of what was then, and what still can be made, one of our most important industries vested in the federal power. Sir John A. Macdonald, however, with his prophetic vision, saw the possibility of a Canadian union. He looked ahead to the time when British Columbia would enter confederation; he knew, as we all know, that in dealing with the problems pertaining to the fisheries of British Columbia and Nova Scotia there would be divergent interests, and he considered it prudent, in a national sense, that the fisheries should be controlled by the central power. Eventually Sir Charles Tupper agreed with him and after the consummation of confederation the control of our fisheries was vested in the central power. I realize that this is a controversial resolution; I realize that there are Conservatives and Liberals who will oppose it, but the fact is that so far as the fishermen of the island of Cape Breton are concerned their condition is worse than that of the industrial population of any other part of Canada. I make that statement advisedly, because I know whereof I speak. Only a few months before I went to the hospital I was in the county so ably represented by my tolerant friend from Richmond-West Cape Breton, the Minister of Finance (Mr. Rhodes), which was represented many years ago by my grandfather, first as provincial secretary in the legislature and later, after confederation, in the federal House of Commons. I found that in one district, where the people depend entirely upon the fisheries industry for the maintenance of life, there was dire distress on every hand. We hear a good deal about the right of workingmen to a living wage, but the most fundamental right of all is the right to live. I found that in that district they were not able to support a school, because the company that has control over these beam trawlers in the province of Nova Scotia has a monopoly. We might as well be fair and frank about it; they have a monopoly of the fishing industry in the province of Nova Scotia. There may be those who are spineless enough to disagree with me, but I think whatever may be said of me when I quit public life it will be agreed that I always had the spunk to say what I thought, whether a Conservative liked it or a Liberal liked it. To-day the fact is that we have a monopoly of the fishing industry of the province of Nova Scotia, and a United States controlled monopoly at that. These people dictate the prices of fish to the shore fishermen, when they can sell their fish, and in many cases they cannot sell it at all. Along the shores of the county so ably represented by my hon. friend from Cape Breton North-Victoria (Mr. Johnstone) last summer the price of hake was 35 cents a hundred pounds. I would be casting pearls before swine to talk about fish in this part of the country, but I can tell hon. members that you cannot get anything better to eat than hake. The fishermen go out at three o'clock in the morning and bring back two hundred pounds of hake, for which they do not receive enough to pay for the gasoline for their motor boat. That is a fact, and the same condition exists all along the coast of Inverness and Richmond. The very essence of a monopoly is the power to fix prices, and in Nova Scotia that power is vested in a United States controlled corporation. Beam Trawlers I say there is an obligation on the part of this government to take some action. Something was done by the previous government; in 1927 a commission was appointed, consisting of eminent men, to investigate the fishing industry of the maritime provinces. I believe they went into this question fairly, dispassionately and without prejudice of any kind, and four of the five members of that commission agreed that the beam trawler should be abolished. Even Judge Maclean, although he dissented from the view of his colleagues, did not do so very strongly. It was proposed by the then government that a duty should be levied on beam trawler caught fish landed in Canadian waters, and that was done. Unfortunately it was by order in council, and that order in council ultimately was held by the courts to be ultra vires. As a private member it is not open to me to move that a duty be imposed on beam trawler caught fish; everyone familiar with the rules of this house knows it is not competent for a private member to do so, but I would point out that after this commission heard evidence in different important fishing centres of the maritime provinces their findings were endorsed by Liberals, Conservatives, Progressives, Labour men, and everyone else. On consulting the record I find that petitions were presented to the commission, urging the abolition of beam trawlers, from many communities in both Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. As I have said, Mr. Speaker, I know this is a controversial question, and I want to say frankly that I am not a socialist. I do not believe in the confiscation of private property. The fishermen of the maritime provinces believe to-day that by curtailing for a time the operations of the trawlers they would derive great benefit, and I believe it is the duty of the government to make arrangements with the beam trawler owners whereby operations of those boats may be suspended for two years. Give the shore fishermen of the maritimes a chance to live; that is all they are asking. They are not looking for doles, but are anxious and willing to work. They have a product which is needed right here in the city of Ottawa, in Toronto and in Montreal, one which is not produced on a competitive basis, as is coal, or some other commodities. If they are given any chance to make a living I will say that those fishermen in the maritimes will not want doles, or anything else. They are looking to this government, just as they have looked to previous governments for the right to live. I agree with what the hon. member for Antigonish- Guysborough (Mr. Duff) said only a few nights ago, namely, that never since the maritimes entered the Canadian union have the interests of the fishermen been considered, whether by a Liberal or a Conservative government. There has never been a proper appreciation of the importance of the industry to the people of Nova Scotia. The time has come when we should consider earnestly the measures to be taken to give these people a chance to live. In my observations I do not wish to be provocative because I know there are those who will oppose the resolution. However if they become too strenuous in their opposition I shall reserve my right to reply. May I say frankly I am not looking for votes but have spoken in all good faith. I have no interest whatever in the fishing companies of the province of Nova Scotia, but I have a very keen interest in the fishing hamlets of that province. I say the population in those hamlets has in the past forty years been reduced by 47 per cent. It is time something was done by those under whose control the fishing industry was placed when the maritimes became part of the Canadian union. They should try to do something to see that these people are given their rights, and the right not only to work but to live. They can earn a profitable living if they are given the proper encouragement and opportunity, and if they have a chance to sell their fish. I submit the house should consider carefully this question relating to the licensing of beam trawlers, and I would urge that the fishermen of that province can earn their own living without the dole or any other assistance if they are given the opportunities they were promised when in good faith the province of Nova Scotia entered the union.


LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. WILLIAM DUFF (Antigonish-Guys-borough):

Mr. Speaker, with very much that the hon. member for Inverness (Mr. Mac-dougall) has said I am in accord. His resolution reads:

That, in the opinion of this house, in the interests of the fishermen of Nova Scotia, no permits should be granted or renewed with those who own and operate beam trawlers in the province of Nova Scotia.

The matter of licensing or permitting trawlers equipped with whait has been known either as a beam or an otter trawler is one about which there has been a great deal of controversy during the last few years. To-day however it seems to me that there is not so much reason as there has been in the past to fear this method of fishing.

Beam Trawlers

In the beginning may I make my position clear. For some forty years I have consistently and without change opposed the method of catching fish by what is known as either a beam or an otter trawl. I have never changed that view, and my reason for opposing such methods has been that because of the operation of these trawlers a great deal of fishing gear belonging to ordinary deep sea fishermen has been destroyed, and in my view the feeding grounds of the fish have been harmed because the beam trawl runs along the bottom of the ocean. Then, in the operation of the trawls large quantities of small fish are either caught and brought to land to be used in the fertilizer plants or are thrown overboard after having been picked out from among the larger fish on board the trawler. Most of those fish are dead when they are thrown into the sea. Then of course there is the interference with the market of the offshore and inshore fishermen.

However, as I said a moment ago, I believe that at this time we have not as much cause for worry as we had a number of years ago. In his motion the hon. member asks the government not to renew licences to those who own and operate beam trawlers. I do not wish to criticize the manner in which he has put his motion, but I would remind him that there is no such thing as a beam trawler now being licensed by the federal government. I agree with him that when speaking about these vessels he no doubt had in mind the fact that the ordinary term used is the term "beam trawlers"; but they are not beam trawlers, they are what are known as "otter trawlers".

In order to clear the situation perhaps I may be permitted to give the history of this particular way of catching fish. I do so because there has been a good deal of talk among people generally and a great amount of worry among the fishermen regarding this method of catching fish.

As far back as 1839 the first vessels were equipped with what are known as beam trawls. These vessels operated in the North sea and adjacent to England and France. An arrangement was arrived at between the French and English governments whereby these vessels could fish only under certain regulations. At that time only sailing vessels were used to carry on this particular type of fishing. The beam trawl consisted of a large net at the mouth of which was a beam about forty feet long. As I said a moment ago, in those days only sailing vessels were used, and had not the beam been used it would have been im-

possible to keep the mouth of the net open to catch the fish.

Later, I believe in the year 1880, the fishermen of England and Scotland decided to improve the method of fishing, and as a result a man named Otter devised what is known as the otter trawl. That is the trawl now used by the steam vessels or trawlers running out of Nova Scotia and licensed by this government. The otter trawl still has the bag to catch the fish, but instead of having the beam or long piece of wood to keep the mouth of the trawl open it has two boards, and as the steamer steams ahead these boards keep the mouth of the trawl open so that the fish may come in. Although the hon. member mentions beam trawlers in his resolution I am sure he means the method of trawling adopted by certain vessels now licensed by the federal government.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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?

Mr MACDOUGALL:

It is a synonymous term.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

Fishing by this method has

been developed to a great extent not only in Great Britain but in a number of foreign countries. The ships which fished in the first instance in the North sea have not confined their operations to those particular waters. After a few yearn fishing became so intensive that they were compelled to go further afield in order to get catches. These vessels now under the British flag, the Portuguese flag and the flags of other countries not only go as far as Iceland, but also come over on the grand banks of Newfoundland and other banks where our Nova Scotia sailing vessels operate during the spring and summer season. To show you, sir, the extent of the fisheries in those foreign countries, may I say to you that at present there are 1,229 large steam and motor trawlers operating out of England or under English registry; 347 from Scottish ports; 154 from Irish ports, 236 from Holland!; 17 from Portugal; about 250 from France; 50 from Belgium; 1 from Denmark; 335 from Germany; and 184 from Sweden, making a total of 2,976 steam and motor trawlers. So you will see, Mr. Speaker, that in those countries this method of fishing is carried on to a very appreciable extent.

Now on this side of the water this method of catching fish by beam or otter trawl only started in 1905. During the years from 1905 down to the present, certain vessels have been operating, and they were first chartered by three or four companies in the province of Nova Scotia, being vessels owned in the old

Beam Trawlers

country which were operated here in the early spring and then returned to their English owners some time in the fall.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

May I ask the hon. gentleman a question, for information? Do any of these foreign trawlers come to our shores?

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

In reply to the Prime Minister I may say that they only come to our shores for supplies. I think my hon friend from Cape Breton South (Mr. MacDonald) and my hon. friend from Cape Breton North-Victoria (Mr. Johnstone) will agree with me when I say that when these vessels come to Sydney or North Sydney for coal supplies or salt they leave a good deal of money in these places, but of course, as the Prime Minister knows, these vessels can only fish in international waters, and the only effect which these trawlers have on the Canadian fishing industry is that they destroy the gear of the ordinary fishing vessel anchored on>

the banks, because these trawlers operate by night as well as by day and cannot see where our vessels have their trawls moored; and they also help to destroy the feeding grounds where the fish come to the banks and where our fishermen go to secure their catch.

As I said a moment ago, in 1905 both Canada and the United States decided to adopt to a certain extent this particular method of fishing, and only last year there were 115 of these trawlers operating out of Portland and 49 out of Boston.

Our position to-day, I might say to my hon. friend from Inverness, is rather an enviable one. I want to say again that I have always opposed this method of fishing, and if I had my way there would be no trawlers operating from the province of Nova Sootia; but still, as my hon. friend from Inverness admitted in the last of his remarks, if something were done to prevent these trawlere from getting a licence, their owners should be compensated for the money they have invested in the industry. I agree with him as far as that goes.

For several years, as I have said, trawlers were brought from the old country and operated by Canadian firms. Several delegations came to Ottawa to interview previous governments in the matter. A delegation came to the Conservative government, I think in 1920, came from the county in which I live; and about three years ago another delegation came here protesting against the use of this method of catching fish. But if we look at the statistics, Mr. Speaker, we find that although there were some twelve trawlers in operation in 1908 and up to about 1930, there are now

only two operating. Four licences were granted last year, but only two of these trawlers are operating.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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CON

Harry Bernard Short

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SHORT:

Three licences were granted last year.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

Three licences were granted last year, but only two trawlers are operating. The reason for that in my opinion is that the people of Nova Scotia have endeavoured in the last two years to look after this danger in their own way. I remember discussing this matter with a good many people. My hon. friend from Inverness said that he was not interested in the political aspects of the thing, nor did he have any money invested in the industry. I am interested and am looking after both aspects, because to a small degree I have a financial interest in the industry in the province of Nova Scotia. In discussing this method of catching fish by beam trawler with the people with whom I am interested,

I used the argument that was adduced by the hon. member for Inverness. I said that the people in these various countries had invested their money in foreign trawlers from Great Britain, Portugal and other places that came to the banks adjacent to Nova Scotia to catch fish, and I said that as long as people from these other countries could use their trawlers there for catching fish there was not much use in trying by restrictive methods of this parliament to refuse licences to two or three trawlers owned or operated by Canadians as far as deep sea fishing is concerned. I suggested another method of control, and I think that method has borne fruit; I believe my hon. friend from Digby-Annapolis will agree with me in that. He knows that previous to the year 1929, the deep sea fishing fleet of Nova Scotia wa3 operated by sail only. The vessels left home in the middle of March and fished, most of them, until about the first of October. They did try to fish during the winter months when there is a big market for fresh haddock and fresh cod, but travelling by sail alone, when they gave up the salt fishing about the first of October, they found that the winter fishing for fresh fish did not work out very well because in stormy weather, if they did not get back to port a short time after catching their fish, the fish would not arrive in very good condition. But due to the cooperative methods that were adopted, and adopted voluntarily by a certain class of people in the province of Nova Scotia, and particularly in the county in which I live, these people decided that if they were to carry on the fresh fish business and compete

Beam Trawlers

with the trawlers they would have to put diesel engines in their vessels so that they could go out on the banks and get back to port with their catch as quickly as possible. The result has been that in the province of Nova Scotia we have built up a splendid fleet of fishing vessels of a particular type manned by the hardy fishermen of Nova Scotia, than whom there are none better in the world for deep sea or off-shore fishing.

I hold in my hand an article from the Canadian Fisherman, which gives a picture of one of the latest models of sailing and diesel powered fishing vessels. This vessel was built in my own town last year, and equipped with a 300 horsepower engine. To indicate to you, Mr. Speaker, the cooperative methods that we follow in Nova Scotia you will perhaps not think me egotistical or boastful when I say that I own one sixty-fourth of this vessel in which I have a five hundred dollar interest. That is the way we carry on our operations in the part of the province from which I come. To-day there are some twenty-three vessels equipped with diesel engines and they can take their place practically with these otter trawlers, which fish in a different way. As you no doubt know, Mr. Speaker, these sail and diesel engine trawlers do not operate the beam trawl but the line trawl. It is true, and I agree with my hon. friend from Digby-Annapolis (Mr. Short), that under certain weather conditions the fishermen on the sail and diesel engine trawlers cannot fish in the same way as the otter trawler can. But knowing the fishermen of Nova Scotia as he does, knowing the men on these vessels that sell goods to his own firm, he will agree I think that it is but seldom that the fishermen on these vessels cannot go and catch cod just as the fishermen on the otter trawlers can.

In view of that fact I do not think the danger is so serious as we are sometimes led to believe. In my opinion, the people who own the two or three otter trawlers will not buy new ones if anything should happen to those they now own, because at the moment these twenty-three diesel boats can bring in all the fish and more than all the fish which the Canadian people are consuming or will consume for a number of years.

We did make an attempt in this parliament to regulate this method of fishing. The hon. member for Digby-Annapolis, the then hon. member for Cape Breton South, Mr. MacDonald, a gentleman who is now in the other chamber, and I, were a subcommittee of the marine and fisheries committee in 1929 to deal with this very matter. There

(Mr. Duff.]

was an agitation at that time to have beam trawling discontinued and we met and submitted certain recommendations. These recommendations were embodied in a bill now known as chapter 42, an act to amend the Fisheries Act, which was passed on June 14, 1929. As a believer in freedom, I could not see my way at that time to recommend to the Minister of Marine that we should lay down the principle that these vessels should not operate at all, but we did make certain recommendations. What are they? Subsection 4 of section 69 reads:

(4) The minister may determine the number of such vessels that shall be eligible to be licensed.

(5) Regulations may be made under the provisions of section forty-six of this act,-

(a) prescribing the form of licence;

(b) specifying the evidence to be submitted with an application for a licence;

(e) fixing the conditions under which a licence shall be issued;

(d) making any other provisions respecting licences.

In these suggestions, which were afterwards put into law, I think we went a great way, because I felt, as I think my colleagues on that subcommittee felt, that if the Department of Fisheries were of the opinion that more fish were being caught by these otter trawlers than should be caught, and that if their operations were a detriment either to the deep sea fishermen or to the inshore fishermen operating in smaller boats than those I have mentioned, and that these people would be materially affected to their disadvantage, the department would have power either the next year or at any time to restrict or prohibit the granting of licences. In other words, under this act they could grant one licence or several licences or none at all, and the fact remains that since that time in 1929 the department has granted very few licences to otter trawlers.

I say therefore that although I am strongly opposed to the method of fishing in this way I do believe that the people of Nova Scotia, perhaps with some help from this parliament in the way of bounties on fish, or in the way of loans to shipbuilders or owners of vessels or those wanting to build ships, as I suggested in my speech on Monday, could build up a sufficient fleet, either a deep sea fleet or shore fleet to operate off the coast of Inverness or off Cape Breton or Guysborough or Halifax or Lunenburg or as far west as Yarmouth, and that in a very short time the owners of these beam trawlers would realize that the cod fish caught by these vessels operated by sail and diesel power are much superior to

Beam Trawlers

those caught by the otter trawler with the net dragging along the bottom of the ocean for three or four hours. The fish caught in that way are not equal to those caught by the other method.

I am opposed to the otter trawler method of fishing, but I do not think we have anything to worry about. One reason why the people who operate these boats wish to have them continued is the consideration of continuity of supply. There is something in that argument-not a great deal but something, or there was a few years ago. With the type of vessels which Nova Scotians are building today, the high powered vessel of .three hundred horsepower, equipped with diesel engines that can operate in almost any weather; with the cold storage plant which my hon. friend's company has at Halifax; with the plant taken over by this government a short time ago; with the splendid cold storage plant in Lunenburg and the cold storage plants at Liverpool, Shelburne and Yarmouth, there is no danger so far as continuity of supply is concerned. Indeed, the trouble is that we can catch more fish than the market will absorb, so far as fresh fish is concerned, and I do not think we need fear very much the one or two otter trawlers now licensed. I know from my own experience that these vessels have never paid. The sailing vessels and the diesel operated boats, except on rare occasions, have paid a fair dividend, and they are more economically operated than the otter trawlers. Personally I do not see much danger. However, I will say this to my hon. friend. If he would like to have the matter discussed, if he or any other member of the fisheries committee thinks that there is danger to the fishermen of Nova Scotia, I do not think I need assure him that my interests have been and are both financially and politically with the boat fishermen of that province, whether they are the deep sea or inshore fishermen, and I desire that they get the greater consideration.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMAS CANTLEY (Pictou):

I

presume that most hon. members will think me ill-advised if I attempt to controvert the arguments brought forward by hon. gentlemen who have spoken on this subject. Be that as it may, and though my county is not a fishing county, except in regard to two branches of the industry, lobster fishing and winter smelt fishing, it appears to me that we might as well go back to the days of the spinning wheel and destroy all the power looms and resort to the old method of pioneer days as to refuse to make progress by modern methods of fishing. The world does move and we have to move with it.

The hon. member for Antigonish-Guys-borough (Mr. Duff) referred to the effect of the trawlers in British waters. May I remind him that a British commission investigated that whole question some years ago. My reading is not that their fishing grounds were depleted but that they were improved by the action of the trawlers. The statement that they were depleted by the trawlers is not correct. My hon. friend who represents Anti-gonish-Guysborough shakes his head, but that is the fact. It had been found that the trawler stirs up the bottom of the ocean and that due to this an additional quantity of fish food is made available.

Another fact of some importance is this: there have been operating for years on the coast of Nova Scotia forty, fifty or sixty French trawlers. What is the use of talking about curtailing or stopping our own trawlers when we are powerless to deal with foreign trawlers operating within three miles of our coast? Those foreign trawlers are protected by a French government gunboat which comes out in the beginning of the season and remains with them until they return home in the latter part of September.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

And a hospital ship.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

Yes, quite so. These foreign trawlers have three seasons: one in the bay of Biscay; one on the east maritime coast of Canada, and one in the north sea off the coast of Norway. They are thus occupied practically the entire year.

There is still another fact of some importance, that of our coal used in bunkering. These French trawlers take practically forty thousand tons of Nova Scotia coal each season. I remember one boat coming in to the Scotia coal docks at North Sydney on a Wednesday to replenish its bunkers. I said to the captain: "Are you nearly full?" He replied, "Yes; I will be back on Saturday with my cargo completed and I will fill up my bunkers to take me home." On Saturday morning he came back completely filled up with fish, and after filling up his bunkers he went home. In view of these facts, what is the use of attempting to control the most efficient method we have to-day of fishing? In my judgment what we want to do is this. The difficulty of my hon. friend who moved the resolution is that his people are poor fishermen. I do not want to say this in a deprecating way, but the fact is that their boats are not efficient or well com structed. In my judgment perhaps the best thing the government could do for the fishing industry in Nova Scotia would be to subsidize or otherwise aid in the building of a fleet of

Beam Trawlers

forty or fifty so-called baby trawlers of about sixty or seventy tons, equipped with diesel engines, and give them to the fishermen of Nova Scotia on delayed terms of payment. I commend that to the consideration of the hon. member for Antigonish-Guysborough, the hon. member for Inverness, and the government as well.

I shall, I know, be followed by the hon. member for Digby-Annapolis (Mr. Short) whom we all regard as an authority on the fresh fish business of this country, which I am not. As I stated at the outset I cannot see the advantage of opposing improved conditions whether they be in the fishing industry, the iron and steel industry or in any other in this country, and I believe the best thing this government can do for the fishing industry in my province is to proceed along the lines I have indicated and help them to get efficient fishing boats, well equipped for carrying on their business in the most effective way.

Topic:   BEAM TRAWLERS
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL THAT PERMITS BE NOT GRANTED OR RENEWED IN NOVA SCOTIA
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February 6, 1935