June 30, 1934

LIB

Frederick George Sanderson

Liberal

Mr. F. G. SANDERSON (South Perth):

I wish to draw the attention of the Minister of Trade and Commerce to a dispatch which appears in this morning's papers to the effect that the steamship Pennland is sailing from Southampton to-day for Halifax with a shipment of over 400,000 pounds of Australian flour. Is the minister aware of that, and has he an explanation?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I have not seen the dispatch but I will take notice of what my hon. friend says.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG:

In regard to the shipment of Australian flour to Canada, I wonder whether

the minister is aware that the millers of England are advertising flour made from soft Australian wheat for sale in Canada, and that the British millers are objecting that if this kind of flour is shut out of Canada they will shut out of Britain Canadian flour made from Canadian wheat.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

I will also take notice of what the hon. member for Weyburn says.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Can the Minister of Trade and Commerce stop the importation of Australian flour until the three months necessary notice has expired?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

That is under the control of the agreement-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Then it cannot be stopped for three months.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

-and the terms of the agreement will be observed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT AND FLOUR
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS


On the orders of the day: Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford): The Minister of Railways, in a debate in the house about two months ago, said that he would have a statement to make with regard to Canadian National Railways branch line construction in western Canada. I wonder whether he could make a statement in that regard to-day.


CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Minister of Railways) :

I think the hon. gentleman misinterpreted my words. I said that when the estimates of the Canadian National Railways were being discussed by the special committee the whole matter could be discussed, but no one brought it up. The officers were here and my hon. friend could have appeared and brought the matter up, but he did not do so, and consequently I have no statement to make.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Sub-subtopic:   BRANCH LINE CONSTRUCTION IN WESTERN CANADA
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CIVIL SERVICE COMMITTEE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Edgar-Rodolphe-Eugène Chevrier

Liberal

Mr. E. R. E. CHEVRIER (Ottawa):

I have a question to ask the Prime Minister. Will concurrence in the last civil service committee's report be moved at this session, and, if not, will the right hon. gentleman indicate why.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CIVIL SERVICE COMMITTEE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

The answer is no.

Radio Broadcasting

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CIVIL SERVICE COMMITTEE
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RADIO BROADCASTING


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved the third reading of Bill No. 126, respecting radio broadcasting.


?

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE ICING@Leader of the Opposition

I rise, not to object to the third reading of this bill but once more to bring to the attention of the government, and possibly by my words in this house at the moment, to the attention of the radio commission as well, the importance of some arrangement being made before a general election which will insure impartiality in the use of the radio as between different political parties. I mentioned the matter yesterday and I am not sure whether the government has included any provision in the Elections Act itself. It may be difficult so to arrange.

On the other hand, the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) may be in a position to make a statement to the house as to what the country might expect in that regard. Personally I feel that the radio to-day plays such an important part in all matters affecting public opinion that it would be quite proper that some provision should be made whereby, for example, each political party which has a representative following should be entitled to have broadcast at the expense of the state one or two addresses which would set forth its platform or policies before the people. That I believe is the custom in Great Britain itself and it might well be followed here. Apart from that I think there ought to be some definite understanding that radio where it is to be used for political purposes will be used in a manner which will not give to one party which may happen to have more in the way of financial backing than other parties, a larger use of that national instrument. The radio to-day is a national instrument and the necessity for its use impartially as between different parties that are appealing for public support on matters of public policy is only too obvious. I hope the government has not overlooked making provision in the election measure which we will be discussing later in the day and that the Prime Minister will, either now or later on, make a statement to the house on the matter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the matter to which the right hon. gentleman has directed attention is one of very great importance. At the last federal general election it will be recalled that the Canadian National Railways had the largest measure of facilities for use in broad-

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casting and perhaps he will recall that lots were drawn for periods of time that would be used, with the exception that as Prime Minister he was to have the right to close, as he did. I was a party to that arrangement which I thought not an unfair one. I thought it was the proper thing to do; I said so at the time and I say so now.

My attention was forcibly directed to what the right hon. gentleman is now discussing during the progress of the recent election in Ontario when the facilities to a very considerable extent of some private enterprises were in the hands of one party and another had certain facilities of another kind. As there is no complete nationalization of radio broadcasting facilities, the right hon. gentleman will realize that the extent of the supervision or control that can be exercised by the broadcasting commission becomes of course of the utmost importance. There are complaints made against the commission if it says that the particular radio facilities at, we will say "X" town, should not be utilized continuously by one political party and that opportunity should be afforded for another party also to use them. That is not easily disposed of by the radio commission and I assure the right hon. gentleman that I agree with him that something will have to be done to prevent any abuses or cause for complaint that the radio facilities are placed by contract or otherwise at the disposal of one party to the exclusion of others, and that some opportunity must be given to all to place their case before the electors. Just how this may be accomplished I am not at the moment fully advised because the situation in Canada is not like that in England where the commission owns and controls the entire distribution, so to speak, through the air. Although in this country they have the power to control, they do not own the facilities through which the control can be exercised. I have every reason to believe and I can assure the right hon. gentleman that nothing will be done that will permit of any such abuse as he suggests. My personal opinion is, having regard to the satisfactory manner in which we disposed of the matter at the last federal general election, possibly some similar arrangement can be made. Whether or not that is possible is a matter on which I am not in a position to express any definite opinion. I can only assure the house that so far as the influence of the government may be able to control the broadcasting commission, no such difficulties as those to which the right hon. gentleman has referred will be permitted to arise.

Radio Broadcasting

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Quebec East):

Mr. Speaker, just a word. I quite realize that in privately owned stations, though they are to some extent under the control of the commission, it would be difficult to arrange in a definite way to apportion the time among the various political parties; but so far as the program of the commission itself, I mean the national hook-up, is concerned, it is very easy and I think it would be only fair for the commission to divide the time equally, or at least to give the same measure of justice to the various parties for national broadcasts of political discussions. I wish, as my right hon. leader has done, especially to direct the matter to the attention of the commission.

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (West Edmonton) ; Mr. Speaker, might I suggest that when the matter is under discussion it be considered that at least two of those broadcasts, that is, one at the opening of the campaign and one at the clo.se of it, be given free of charge to the various parties.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
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June 30, 1934