June 27, 1934

CON

Mr. DURANLEAU: (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. No, not so far as the Department of Marine is aware.

2. Yes.

3. Yes.

4 and 5. He was engaged in a temporary capacity only for fitting out this spring.

6. V. G. (very good).

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   H. MICHAUD
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UPKEEP OP BUOYS-ISLAND OF ORLEANS

LIB

Mr. CASGRAIN:

Liberal

1. Who held the contract for the upkeep of buoys in the North channel, Island of Orleans. Quebec, from the month of May, 1931, to the month of May, 1934?

2. What was the contract price?

3. Was the contract awarded after competitive bids had been called?

4. Who were the tenderers?

5. Were complaints lodged against the person who secured the contract at the lowest tender price?

6. Has the contract for the year 1934 to the year 1937 been awarded on a tender basis?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UPKEEP OP BUOYS-ISLAND OF ORLEANS
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

1 and 2. Alphonse Poulin from July 2, 192S, lo July 2, 1931, contract price $220 per annum; Charles Poulin from July 2, 1931, to January 2, 1932, informal agreement at rate of $220 per annum; Charles Poulin from January 2, 1932, to July 2, 1934, contract price $150 per annum.

3. Yes.

4. Charles Poulin $150 per annum; Alphonse Poulin, $220 per annum. Three additional tenders were received after the expiry date but all three higher than that of Charles Poulin.

5. No.

6. Tenders were not called. The price is that established by tender in 1931.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UPKEEP OP BUOYS-ISLAND OF ORLEANS
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QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN

LIB

Mr. BOULANGER:

Liberal

1. How many postmasters were dismissed in the province of Quebec since the elections of July 28. 1930, to date, on the ground that they had taken an active part in politics?

2. Did O. L. Boulanger, M.P., inform the Prime Minister and the Minister of Justice that J. L. A. Tanguay, of Quebec, clerk, grade 4, in the Department of Justice, had taken an active part in politics since his appointment?

3. Did the government have such charges investigated as in the case of the postmasters?

4. If so, what was the result of such investigation?

5. Will the government dismiss the said J. L. A. Tanguay in the same manner as postmasters were dismissed?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN
Sub-subtopic:   POSTMASTERS DISMISSED-QUEBEC
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CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAHAN:

Return tabled herewith.

434S

Railway Act

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN
Sub-subtopic:   POSTMASTERS DISMISSED-QUEBEC
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RAILWAY ACT

AMENDMENTS SUGGESTED BY LABOUR REPRESENTATIVES IN VIEW OF JOINT OPERATING SERVICES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Pierre-François Casgrain (Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. P. F. CASGRAIN (Charlevoix-Sague-nay):

Mr. Speaker, on June 15, on the orders of the day, I asked the Prime Minister if it was the intention of the government to introduce legislation at this session amending the Railway Act in accordance with certain representations and suggestions made by the railway employees. I remember that at that time the Prime Minister told me the Minister of Railways and Canals was not in his seat, but he might be able at a later date to give information about the matter.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS SUGGESTED BY LABOUR REPRESENTATIVES IN VIEW OF JOINT OPERATING SERVICES
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

I intimated to the hon. gentleman that the government did not desire to open the Railway Act, if it could be avoided. There was a special committee; I have not asked the minister what the substance of the discussion was, but I fancy that not having been mentioned it is not intended to open the act.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS SUGGESTED BY LABOUR REPRESENTATIVES IN VIEW OF JOINT OPERATING SERVICES
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

I should like to ask the Prime Minister in the event of the house not concluding its proceedings this week, what the intention of the government is with respect to sitting on Monday. In that connection I should like also to ask whether it might not be considered advisable at the present time to have morning sittings for the remainder of the present week, and sittings on Saturday, if necessary.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

The right hon. gentleman has anticipated what I was about to say. I have been making a survey of the business the house still has to dispose of before prorogation. There will be considerable time taken up, probably, with the two bills considered by the special committee. I cannot speak as to the length of time they will take. Supplementary estimates are still standing with respect to one or two matters of some importance. If the suggestion which I hope may be acted upon is acted upon I anticipate there will be little difficulty about a matter which several hon. gentlemen opposite have brought to the

attention of the house in connection with pensions legislation. If the suggestion I have to make is adopted it may require the changing of half a dozen words in one of the statutes, but I apprehend nothing of any material purport. Then, the only other matters are those appearing on the order paper. There is a third reading, there is further consideration of the public works bill and there is a report from the radio committee. From what the chairman said to me yesterday I gather that they are making certain suggestions as to how the service might be improved, but recommend that between now and another session of parliament the matter may be studied by engineers and others connected with the Department of Marine, as well as with the radio broadcasting commission, and that the legislation which expired on the first of May be renewed for another year. That probably would not take very long.

Apart from that I know of nothing which should engage the attention of the house at length, except it be a matter arising out of a motion which I understand the right hon. gentleman opposite (Mr. Mackenzie King) may desire to make indicating their continued lack of confidence in the administration. Outside of that I do not see that any length of time will be taken up in the disposition of business. There is, of course, the interim report from the price spreads committee which will have to be considered. I understand that for the moment their sittings are practically concluded, and possibly to-morrow or Friday an interim report will be made by the chairman. If, therefore, we sat on Friday morning at eleven o'clock until one o'clock in the afternoon, and on Saturday morning from eleven o'clock until one o'clock, and sat until the evening, we might possibly be able to conclude our business. I cannot speak as to that. I was about to say, however, that so far as the government is concerned it will endeavour to expedite that arrangement, and if the house thought it desirable I would submit later a resolution providing for meeting to-morrow morning. But in that regard, owing to the committee still sitting, I thought possibly it would not be the desire of the house to do so. But if the house so desires I certainly will submit such a resolution this afternoon. That would obviate the necessity for sitting on Monday. However, I think in view of the circumstances if we cannot finish on Saturday we must endeavour to sit on Monday for part of the day, in any event, to be certain that our business would be concluded for the next day, when we could have prorogation. But if it

United States Trade Zones

is the wish of the house the government will use every possible endeavour to dispose of the business by Saturday night.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

So far as the motion I have in mind is concerned, I think it will be easily understood by the country and so cordially approved by everyone-

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think so.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

-that I may be able to dispose of it in very short order. I shall try to accommodate myself to the wishes of the government in that respect.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT CONCERNING FURTHER BUSINESS, MORNING SITTINGS, AND PROBABLE TIME OF PROROGATION
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June 27, 1934