June 12, 1934

PRICE SPREADS AND MASS BUYING


On the orders of the day:


CON

Ira Delbert Cotnam

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. I. D. COTNAM (North Renfrew):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to inquire of the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Stevens) if it is the intention of his committee to investigate the price spreads in coal, gasoline and agricultural implements?

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Minister of Trade and 'Commerce):

I did not quite catch the question of my hon. friend but I understand that he is inquiring if the committee is going to investigate certain additional matters. I think I answered this question the other day when I said that the committee is pretty well loaded up with material at the moment. We are making as rapid progress as possible but there are several important subjects before the committee for investigation and whether it will have time and opportunity to extend its investigations into these subjects is a matter which cannot be determined at the moment.

Mr. MaoLEAN: Why not be specific and say coal or gasoline?

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

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CON

Albert Joseph Brown

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROWN:

Where was the hon. member for North Renfrew (Mt. Cotnam) a few years ago?

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WAYS AND MEANS

CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT


The house in committee of ways and means, Mr. MacDonald (Cape Breton South) in the chair.


CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. E. N. RHODES (Minister of Finance) :

The first item to be taken up is in connection with item 79 of the customs tariff.

I filed the finding of the tariff board with respect to certain items covering nursery stock and I gave notice of an amendment in ' consequence of that finding, which amendment is to be found in the votes and proceedings of May 29. The amendment reads:

That schedule A to the customs tariff, as amended by resolution No. 3. of April 18, 1934. be further amended' by striking thereout tariff items 79. 79'b, 79c, 81 and 82, the several enumerations of goods respectively and the several rates of duties of customs, if any, set opposite thereto and by inserting the following items, enumerations and rates of duty in said schedule A:-

Item 79-Florist stock, viz:-Azaleas, rhododendrons, pot-grown lilacs; hydrangeas and other pot-grown plants, n.o.p.; rose stock and other stock for grafting or budding, n.o.p.; seddling carnation stock, araucarias, bulbs, corms, tubers, rhizomes and dormant roots, n.o.p; dwarf polyantha rose bushes imported by florists or purchased in bond in Canada for bona fide forcing purposes in their own greenhouses prior to disposal; laurel and holly foliage, natural or preserved, whether in designs or bouquets or not: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 15 per cent; general tariff, 20 per cent.

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Amendment agreed to. Customs tariff-79b. Flowers and foliage, natural, cut, whether in designs or bouquets, or not, n.o.p.: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, free; general tariff, 40 per cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-79c. Trees, being seedling stock for grafting, viz: apple, plum, pear, peach and other fruit trees, including buds and scions for grafting such trees; peach pits for planting purposes: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, free; general tariff, free. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-81. Trees, n.o.p., viz.:- (a) Apple, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 6 cents; general tariff, 7i cents. Provided that when imported between September 15 and October 5, inclusive, the duty under the intermediate or general tariff rates shall not be more than 3 cents each. (b) Pear, plum, cherry, apricot, quince, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 8 cents; general tariff, 9 cents. Provided that when imported between September 15 and October 5, inclusive, the duty on cherry trees and on plum trees under the intermediate or general tariff rates shall not be more than 3 cents each. (c) Peach, including June buds, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 5 cents; general tariff, 6 cents. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-82: (a) Grape vines, gooseberry and currant bushes or roots, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 2 cents; general tariff, 2i cents. (b) Raspberry, loganberry and blackberry bushes or roots; rhubarb roots, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 1 cent; general tariff, 1 cent. (c) Asparagus roots and strawberry plants, each: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, i cent; general tariff, J cent. (d) Rosebushes, n.o.p., each: British preferential tariff, 1J cents; intermediate tariff, 3 cents; general tariff, 7 cents. (e) Trees, shrubs, vines, plants, roots and cuttings, commonly known as florists or nursery stocks, n.o.p.: British preferential tariff, 12J per cent; intermediate tariff, 174 per cent; general tariff, 30 per cent. Item agreed to.


CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

I have an amendment to move that Schedule A to the customs tariff, as amended by resolutions in committee of ways and means, be further amended by striking thereout tariff item 99c and by inserting in lieu thereof the following:

Customs tariff-99c. Raisins and dried currants:

(i) Until July 31, 1935 . . . per pound: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 4 cents; general tariff, 4 cents.

(ii) Thereafter . . . per pound: British

preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 3 cents; general tariff, 3 cents.

When in packages weighing two pounds each, or less, the weight of such packages to be included in the weight for duty.

This is extending for one year more the Australian preference.

Item agreed to on division.

Customs tariff-117. Halibut livers, fresh: British preferential tariff; intermediate tariff, free; general tariff, free.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

My hon. friend was going to give me some information with regard to this item, particularly with regard to the supply of halibut livers for the furnishing of oil required for consumption in the dominion and as to the amount of oil required for consumption in Canada.

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

Mr. Chairman, as I understood it, the item stood at the request of my hon. friend from Shelbume-Yarmouth, his

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

desire being that I should get some additional iniformatiion, but I am unable to furnish any additional information to the committee as requested for the reason that the items have not been separated and we have no statistics available with respect to this item at all.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

What I wanted to find out was whether or not halibut livers were being admitted free into this country to-day, when there was an ample supply in the country. I have made inquiries and I am unable to get the information at least from the bureau of statistics or the Department of Fisheries. I was endeavouring to get the information from the trade, but I have received no information as yet. Can my hon. friend tell me whether or not halibut livers are produced in this country in sufficient quantity to supply the domestic demand?

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

Mr. Chairman, I had to seek the same sources of information as my hon. friend, and I have been unable to get a specific answer to the last question he put for the reason that heretofore, as my hon. friend knows, there has been no marketing of halibut livers. So I am not in a position to say whether there is a sufficient quantity available from our Canadian fisheries to supply the market in Canada.

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

I believe that there is a considerable amount of cod liver oil manufactured from halibut liver, and I am interested in knowing if that process is going on in Canada.

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

Such as has been used hitherto has been imported entirely from the United States. My information is that the use of halibut liver oil is in addition to the demand which hitherto existed for cod liver oil exclusively and that the use of halibut liver oil is increasing quite rapidly.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

I understand that representations came from British Columbia for this change in the tariff due to the fact that American halibut livers were being landed at Prince Rupert and were having to pay a duty. I understand the suggestion was made that they could be manufactured in Canada if they were allowed to be admitted duty free. Can my hon. friend tell me whether or not the product will be marketed in Canada or used for export to the United States and other countries.

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

My hon. friend is not quite right in saying that they have been landed in Canada. As a matter of fact the duty prohibited their being landed. They were shipped by vessel back to the United States

or were dumped overboard. I believe the idea behind the request that they should be admitted free of duty is that we might have another industry in Canada developed. The demand in Canada, as I understand it, is comparatively limited and for a time at all events they will have to seek the export market for the major portion of the halibut liver oil produced. My information comes from the trade and is not based on any actual statistics or on a very wide degree of experience. But such is the expectation of the industry.

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LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

My point is that in view of the fashion nowadays, with which I do not agree, to find out whether or not there is a possibility of supplying the home market entirely with homemade products rather than to export products, it seems to me that before changes are made in tariff items affecting natural products we should know whether the natural products which we produce in this country are sufficient to supply the demand for the finished product which is made from them. As I understand it the minister has not been able to get that information and I have been unable to get it, and I find a difficulty in intelligently discussing or voting on the item which proposes a change and proposes to admit free natural products from foreign countries which may come into competition with our own products.

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June 12, 1934