May 31, 1934

LIB

Robert McKenzie

Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE (Assiniboia):

I can believe that myself because I was a graduate of a veterinary college about thirty years ago and I do not know that I would care to re-register. But the thing that seems to annoy these veterinary surgeons is the fact that under present economic conditions they cannot afford to go to the expense of taking this short course. So far as tuberculosis work is concerned I do not think there is anything _ particular about it requiring any special examination, and I imagine that is the greater part of the work. Probably the minister has a copy of the memorandum that was passed at a meeting of the council of the Veterinary Association of Saskatchewan in February last. From the letter accompanying it I believe a copy was sent to practically every local member of the house as well as to the minister himself, but in case the minister has overlooked it I will just put it on Hansard so that we can see what is the feeling of the veterinary association. The memorandum reads;

1. To draw the attention of the minister to the fact that the men who passed the parttime examinations held last summer have as yet received no work from the health of

Supply-Agriculture-Live Stock

animals branch, in spite of the fact that a list of available men is in the hands of the civil service commission. Also to urge the minister to see that work is given to these men, when it is available, in their own districts, as soon as possible.

2. To suggest to the minister that the examinations for part-time veterinary surgeons held in future be partly oral if possible.

3. To ask the minister that tuberculosis testing be given to accredited veterinarians in their own districts whether they passed the part-time examinations or not as these men have already passed a special examination held by the health of animals branch in tuberculosis and tuberculosis eradication work, and are quite capable of doing the work.

4. To assure the minister of their continued support in his efforts to try out a system of state veterinary medicine and to ask him to put it into force along the lines suggested two or three years ago, as early as possible.

5. The council of the Veterinary Association of Saskatchewan hopes that the minister will call the meeting as soon as possible looking towards the formation of a Dominion-wide veterinary association. If necessary, Saskatchewan would finance its own delegate.

6. The economic condition of the veterinary surgeons in Saskatchewan is at a low ebb, many of them being unable to make calls any longer from inability to collect fees, which means that sick animals are often dying for the want of veterinary service; this is literally true. The council of the Veterinary Association of Saskatchewan considers that the above measures would materially help to remedy the situation.

The veterinary surgeons in my own district with whom I am well acquainted are finding it very hard under present conditions to make ends meet, and although this examination is probably being held for a quite laudable purpose, it seems to me that the test for tuberculosis, and probably other matters but particularly this test, could be carried on almost entirely by the local man. If it is found that he has become rusty, as the minister imagines, he probably would not be given any of the work, but at the same time, in order to keep these men in their particular districts, I would urge the minister to give them all the work it is possible to give them without the necessity of their taking these examinations.

Mr. WEIR (Melfort); I believe in Saskatchewan some seven out of the ten who passed the examination have been given work. No person, veterinary or anybody else, can give me any more enthusiasm than I have as regards the necessity of assisting private veterinaries, especially in western Canada, and every effort is being made to give them assistance and work because I feel that the veterinarian work has been one side of our live stock industry that has been receiving less care than it should because of the circumstances of which I have spoken before.

As regards the conference and our agreeing to pay the expenses of one, some two years ago I got in touch with the veterinary associations to discuss those problems with them and asked if we could have a dominion conference, but for some reason or another each of them named the same man as a delegate and it was a matter of practically this one man meeting with me. He could not speak with the authority of the veterinaries of each province nor on the problems I especially wished to discuss, that is from the practical veterinary point of view, because he had been a specialist and always engaged in research work institutions.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Albert Joseph Brown

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROWN:

I should like to speak in

support of what has been said by the hon. member for Assiniboia (Mr. McKenzie). We all know veterinary surgeons have been having a difficult time; indeed, the price of live stock and horses has been so low it hardly pays to employ a veterinary surgeon, even if the man could pay him. One case was brought to my notice of a man who had for some years been employed by the department to test for tuberculosis. He was employed first at a port of entry in connection with stock coming in from the United States. Although he has the certificate which he had received at that time, of late he has not been permitted to practise. I know it is quite true, as the minister says, men may get rusty in regard to their early training.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

Would the hon.

member mind giving me the man's name?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Albert Joseph Brown

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BROWN:

Not at the moment. I

shall speak again. All of us who have passed examinations in the past realize we would hardly like to be called upon to pass them to-day. A story is told of a professor who said that he had had a horrible dream; it was that he had to pass a freshman's examination. While it is quite possible that men may get rusty on their work it is also possible that the newcomers, smart young men, may set examination papers with which the men who have been in practice for a long time may hardly be familiar. I know when I began to write on examinations my teacher warned me that the worst examiner was a clever young man, and in the course of my experience I found that out to be true. There is just a possibility that examinations may be set on subjects that are rather new and not entirely necessary for the practical work that is required of veterinary surgeons, especially in establishing these tuberculosis areas. I would not for a moment like to interfere with the efficiency of the work

Supply-External Affairs

or to ask that inefficients be requested to do it, but I would urge that as much consideration as possible be given to men who passed their examinations some years ago and who have been in continuous practice ever since.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
UFA

Michael Luchkovich

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. LUCHKOVICH:

I notice this item

includes fairs and exhibitions. I understand fairs are divided into class A and1 class B. Is the department still continuing the grants to class B fairs, and how many of them are still in existence?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

The grant is being

continued although we call them regional fairs just to distinguish them. There are, I believe, thirty so-called B class fairs.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
UFA
CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

The same number, I am given to understand.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Some reference was made earlier in the session to an outbreak of glanders in Quebec. That is a very serious disease but in the past it has been well kept down throughout Canada. I was wondering whether the staff had discovered the source of that outbreak. Was it from the Maine lumber woods, where Quebec farmers sometimes go for winter occupation and might bring the glanders back with them?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

No; the first outbreak was in the eastern townships. For the hon. member's information I might refer him to my answer to the hon. member for Cartier (Mr. Jacobs) who wrote me asking that this information be put on record because of the misunderstanding in reference to it. On May 18 I put on Hansard a very full statement.. In the first place glanders was discovered in a mild form in the eastern townships of Quebec. Three light horses had been shipped in by truck from the United States, and it was felt that they might have been the source of the disease. The vet-erinaries went to the place from which these horses came, and after thorough inquiry found no trace of the disease. It was then concluded that the disease had existed in a mild form in the eastern townships, but difficulty was experienced in checking all the contacts because of the stables through which the horses had passed. That entailed a great deal of work. However, the outbreak is now well under control. The record I put on Hansard indicated that out of quite a large number of horses checked up to May 12, only three reacted. One of the reactors came from a place in Alberta, near Beiseker, so

[Mr. Brown.? .

that we had to go to Alberta and check contacts there as well. As a further measure of protection to the people of the eastern townships all horses going through the horse yards in Montreal are being thoroughly checked, and we believe the disease is now well under control.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Would the minister let us know whether this work was in charge of regular officers of his department, or were they part time men?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

I am glad the hon. member asked that question, because every care was taken to have men who understood the work thoroughly and had had practice in it, and if we had to use any who did not have that experience they were first thoroughly schooled. Colonel Tamblyn, of the permanent force, who has had a lot of experience, came from Kingston and performed some post mortemis for the benefit of these people. In addition to that we brought men from the west who had had experience in dealing with glanders in Alberta.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink

Item agreed to. Salaries, $684,144; contingencies, $90,600.


LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

We said we would let it stand the other evening.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink

Item agreed to. External Affairs- Canada's contribution to the expenses of the League of Nations for 1934, including secretariat, international labour organization and permanent court of international justice, $205,569.42.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

We allowed this item to stand because it is a League of Nations item, but in view of the discussion that took place at the recent annual meeting, and what has been said, probably there is no need of its standing longer.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink

Item agreed to.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think there was an

understanding that one item, penitentiaries, should stand. On one item of pensions and national health the minister was to get some information for the hon. member for West Edmonton (Mr. Stewart) and the hon. member for North Wellington (Mr. Blair). There is item No. 185, unemployment relief, and there is one in miscellaneous, child welfare. No. 239.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Permalink
LIB

May 31, 1934