May 18, 1934

BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY

EFFORT TO STOP HOSTILITIES BY EMBARGO ON SHIPMENT OF ARMS


On the orders of the day:


LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, according to the morning paper Great Britain is heading a number of nations in a proposal to put an embargo on the shipment of armaments to the disputants Bolivia and Paraguay. I understand that in this matter Great Britain seeks cooperation of the United States. I believe that we are not shipping any armaments, but that our people are very much interested in a movement of this kind. I have wondered whether the government could see its way clear to make a statement of endorsation or congratulation of Great Britain upon the stand she seems to be taking at this time.

Topic:   BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY
Subtopic:   EFFORT TO STOP HOSTILITIES BY EMBARGO ON SHIPMENT OF ARMS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre was good enough to indicate to me that he purposed mentioning this matter on the orders of the day. While my personal view was that we might discuss the matter on the item I had left open in the estimates under the Department of External Affairs, namely the item concerning the League of Nations, I have prepared a short statement which I shall be very glad to make to the house at the moment, and further discussions may take place when that estimate is under consideration.

Topic:   BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY
Subtopic:   EFFORT TO STOP HOSTILITIES BY EMBARGO ON SHIPMENT OF ARMS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

We passed that estimate when my right hon. friend was not in the house.

Topic:   BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY
Subtopic:   EFFORT TO STOP HOSTILITIES BY EMBARGO ON SHIPMENT OF ARMS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I thought the house desired to discuss the matter, and I left the item for that reason. If necessary I shall provide facilities for further discussion. The Associated Press dispatch which appeared in this morning's press indicates that Great Britain has taken steps to place an embargo on the shipment of arms to South American countries. I suppose the house recalls the position of members of the League of Nations with respect to matters of this kind. Article 23 of the covenant provides that the members of the League agree to entrust the league with the general supervision of the trade in arms and ammunition with the countries in which the control of this traffic is necessary in the common interest, subject to and in accordance with the provisions of international conventions existing or hereafter to be agreed upon. That, is the provision in the covenant of the League of Nations. It will be within the

memory of hon. members that last year we took action with respect to the International convention.

Canada signed the "International convention for the supervision of the international trade in arms and ammunition and in implements of war" at Geneva on June 17th, 1925, and, following approval by parliament, ratified the convention on May 8th, 1933, subject to the reservation that ratification shall not take effect until ratifications of the convention shall have been effective, in accordance with Article 41 of the convention, in respect of Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States of America.

The object of the convention is to establish a general system of supervision and publicity for the international trade in arms and implements of war and to set up a special system for areas where special measures are gradually recognized to be necessary.

Some action has been taken. But as I shall presently indicate, for reasons that perhaps are well known no very effective action has been taken with respect to this matter among the nations of the world, primarily, I assume, because the convention is not yet in force, and will not become effective until four months after fourteen ratifications have been deposited by the signatory governments with the government of the French republic. So far the convention has been signed on behalf of thirty-seven countries and thirteen ratifications, including the Canadian ratification, have been received, but the majority of these are contingent upon ratification by the producing powers. Of the latter, the following have not yet ratified the convention-Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United States of America. His Majesty's governments in the United Kingdom and in Australia have made their ratifications contingent upon ratification by all producing countries. Our ratification was not dependent upon that qualification.

In February, 1933, His Majesty's government in the United Kingdom suggested to the league that action should be taken under the terms of article XI of the covenant to recommend that the various governments impose an embargo on the export of arms and ammunition to Bolivia and Paraguay. On that occasion the Canadian government notified its willingness to cooperate with other nations in concerting prohibition of export of armaments to Bolivia and Paraguay. A draft regulation to be signed by the governments in favour of this step was considered by the council and accepted by all the states members of the council, including the United Kingdom. A number of states made their acceptance

Freight Rates on Lumber

subject to acceptance of the declaration by a specified number of other states including the United States. The government of the latter country, however, were unable to impose an embargo until necessary legislation was passed by congress.

Yesterday, according to the press dispatches to which I referred, Anthony Eden, Lord Privy Seal of Great Britain, again brought the issue of an embargo on arms and ammunition to Bolivia and Paraguay before the council of the League of Nations, which is now in session at Geneva, expressing the hope that the council would adopt a resolution to consult the arms exporting countries as soon as possible. Press reports indicate that support for the United Kingdom government's proposal was promised by delegates from France, Italy, Spain, Argentina, Czechoslovakia and Australia, which is this year a member of the council as Canada was some years ago. The matter was postponed to a later session of the council "to be convoked as soon as possible." Press reports further indicate that a communication will probably be made to the following countries in addition to the great powers: Canada, Australia,

Belgium, Chile, Denmark, Spain, Estonia, Greece, Latvia, Lithuania, Mexico, Holland, Persia, Poland, Rumania, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and Yugoslavia. No official communication has yet been received by the Canadian government.

I certainly think, as the hon. member has said, that His Majesty's government in Great Britain is to be warmly congratulated and heartily commended for the action that has been taken. I assume that it is hardly necessary for me to add that in the event of the opportunity presenting itself Canada will participate favourably in any such action as may be taken in that regard.

Topic:   BOLIVIA AND PARAGUAY
Subtopic:   EFFORT TO STOP HOSTILITIES BY EMBARGO ON SHIPMENT OF ARMS
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FREIGHT RATES ON LUMBER


On the orders of the day:


CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Minister of Railways and Canals):

The hon. member for Quebec South (Mr. Power) yesterday asked a question respecting an order which he said had been issued by the board of railway commissioners in regard to lumber coming from the Pacific coast eastward. I find that there has been no such order. I shall read the communication that I have received and then lay it on the table:

Referring to your telephone message this p.m. asking for two copies of the ruling of the board in connection with the British Columbia lumber rates, I have made inquiries and I find that there is no recent ruling of the board in

the matter. There is, however, on file an application from the Montreal Wholesale Lumber Dealers Association, Montreal, by telegram dated the 16th instant, and from a number of other lumber associations, for suspension of the proposed reduction in transcontinental lumber rates, British Columbia to eastern Canada, to permit eastern lumber manufacturers to be heard, who claim they need similar reductions to remain in business and compete with coast lumber manufacturers: and I am enclosing, for your information, tw7o copies of letter from the board to the Montreal Wholesale Lumber Dealers Association and the other parties enumerated, which will explain the situation.

Yours very truly,

A. D. Cartwright,

Secretary,

Board of Railway Commissioners.

I am laying copies of the whole correspondence on the table for the information of my hon. friend and others who have asked me in regard to it.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES ON LUMBER
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LIB

Charles Gavan Power

Liberal

Mr. POWER:

This is probably another

of those press rumours to which the Prime Minister referred yesterday.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES ON LUMBER
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GLANDERS IN SOUTHERN QUEBEC


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Samuel William Jacobs

Liberal

Mr. S. W. JACOBS (Cartier):

May I

inquire from the Minister of Agriculture if his department is in a position to give the house any information with regard to a serious outbreak of the disease known as glanders among horses in the province of Quebec, and particularly in the St. Johns district. Would the minister state how many animals have been destroyed, and if the situation is well in hand?

Topic:   GLANDERS IN SOUTHERN QUEBEC
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

The hon. member for Cartier informed me that he was going to ask this question, and because of the uncertainty in the minds of many farmers I think it well to make a fairly detailed statement. There has been an outbreak of glanders in Quebec. The first traces of it appeared on November 1, 1933, in three horses imported by Guy C. Tillotson, Coaticook. Two gave suspicious reaction. They had been transported three hundred miles by truck to Coaticook.

On November 18, 1933, these horses were retested; two reacted and were slaughtered without compensation in accordance with the regulation.

On November 25, 1933, five horses from the same stable as the imported horses reacted and were slaughtered. On November 29 three horses also reacted on this owner's farm, so that the outbreak did not originate from the imported horses. Subsequently it has been found that this outbreak is almost certainly

Soldier Settlement Legislation

a carry-over from an outbreak dealt with three years ago in the Knowlton district, Quebec.

The disease is in a mild form. Very few clinical cases have been found and these so indefinite that suspicion was not aroused; hence glanders was not reported.

Reports of suspected glanders are received from time to time in different parts of Canada and in such cases all the owners' horses are tested with mallein. All imported horses are either accompanied by certificate or tested with mallein before entering Canada.

Immediate steps were taken to trace and test all contacts and as reactors were found this increased the work in tracing contacts from additional diseased horses.

One horse recently shipped from Alberta reacted in Quebec. When traced back its mate reacted. This case was traced back to an outbreak near Beiseker, Alberta, where opposition to giving information had been encountered which made difficult the tracing of all contacts.

This horse had not been in Quebec long and has no relation to the origin of the Quebec outbreak. All contacts in Alberta are being dealt with now.

The details as to compensation are as follows:

Compensation awarded in Ottawa records: 306 horses slaughtered, $23,316.

Compensation passed for payment, $16,980.61.

The latest information from Quebec, dated May 12, 1934, is as follows:

5,511 horses tested.

319 horses reacted.

224 infected premises.

$24,070.33 compensation awarded.

Since the outbreak developed, horses passing through the Montreal yards have been tested, the total number of horses tested being 1,783. The number of officers was gradually increased as the situation warranted. Experienced men were employed and, because of their experience, three were brought from the western provinces. The disease has been confirmed by post mortem examination and in laboratory small animals. The improvement shown during the last week to May 12 is indicated by the following figures: 476 horses tested; 3 reactors. That shows that the situation is well under control.

Topic:   GLANDERS IN SOUTHERN QUEBEC
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VICTORIA DAY ADJOURNMENT


On the orders of the day: Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition): May I ask the Prime Minister if he has reached a decision as to whether or not the house is to sit on the twenty-fourth of May?


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

As a matter of fact, Mr. Speaker, I had not the opportunity to discuss it with one or two who desired to speak about it, but this evening before the house rises I shall bring the matter to the attention of the house. I have no definite idea myself about the matter one way or the other. I would just as soon sit as rise, but it has been suggested that we should not sit.

Topic:   VICTORIA DAY ADJOURNMENT
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ALGERNON LIGHTHOUSE


On the orders of the day:


May 18, 1934