May 11, 1934

CIVIL SERVICE COMMITTEE


Second report of the special committee on the Civil Service Act-Mr. Bowman (for Mr. Lawson).


PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH

UFA

Michael Luchkovich

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. MICHAEL LUCHKOVICH (Vegre-ville):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to correct an erroneous report which appeared in the May 10 issue of the Ottawa Citizen. This is in connection with some remarks I made as to the stand of the Hon. J. E. Brownlee, premier of Alberta, in connection with the marketing bill now before the house. The Ottawa Citizen reports me as follows:

Six provinces have passed companion legislation, announced the agricultural minister, surmounting the constitutional problems arising out of divided authority over trade. Three provinces, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Alberta have not made known their positions. It was stated by Michael Luchkovich, United Farmer member for Vegreville, that at least one premier, J. E. Brownlee, of Alberta, was opposed to the bill.

This report is wrong in two instances. In the first place, the Minister of Agriculture did not include Alberta in the list of provinces that had not passed enabling legislation.

He is reported on page 2940 of Hansard of May 9 as follows:

We have not received copies of legislation passed, nor have we any definite information from Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Manitoba.

In the second place, I never said that Mr. Brownlee was opposed to the bill. I am reported on page 2i940 of Hansard of May 9 as follows:

I understand that at least one premier has put himself on record as being in favour of the principle of the bill. I refer to Premier Brownlee of Alberta.

I based my remarks on an interview which Mr. Brownlee had had with the Toronto Farmers' Sun, wherein he is reported as having said:

The principles of the Weir bill are directly in line with the objectives of the U.F.A.; the measure has the full support of my government.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order.

Provincial Financing in London

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
UFA

Michael Luchkovich

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. LUCHKOVICH:

I should like to know how a newspaper which so often hits the nail on the head could have strayed so far away from the truth in this case.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. What is the question the hon. member is purporting to raise?

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
UFA

Michael Luchkovich

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. LUCHKOVICH:

This is an incorrect report in a newspaper.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

The matter is entirely out of order.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. LUCHKOVICH
Permalink
LIB
LIB

MARKETING ACT

CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

Mr. Speaker, I desire to lay on the table of the house copies of the proposed amendments to Bill No. 51, and also copies of provincial bills and acts passed in 1933 and 1934 relating to the marketing of natural products.

Topic:   MARKETING ACT
Permalink

PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON


On the orders of the day: Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre): Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct the attention of the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) to a question which I asked the other day of the Minister of Finance (Mr. Rhodes). This question which appears on page 2807 of Hansard is as follows: I should like to ask the hon. Minister of Finance what is the policy in general of the federal government in regard to permitting any of the provincial governments to enter the British financial market for refunding purposes. The reply of the Minister of Finance in part was as follows: I shall be happy to direct the attention of my right hon. leader who is Minister of External Affairs to the question for any further answer which may be given on Monday. I direct the attention of the Prime Minister to this matter.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

The question raised by the hon. gentleman is obviously one over which this government has no control. So far as I could ascertain at the time we made the last loan in London the tendency was not to permit provincial governments to make issues on the London market. The hon. gentleman knows quite well that that is not an open market and no issues can be made there unless the treasury has given its consent. The treasury at once accorded the Dominion of Canada

consent to make the loan of last fall. While I have no definite information, my conclusion, from what was said and has since been communicated to me by representatives of the provinces, is that it would be very difficult to secure consent for any provincial government to place a loan upon the British market. That is my information at the moment. The hon. gentleman understands, of course, that there is no finality about matters of this kind; they are subject to change, having regard to the conditions that exist at the time that application may be made. And of course-I want to make this perfectly clear-as my colleague suggests to me, the consent is not ours; it is the British Treasury's.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

May I

ask the Prime Minister a supplementary question arising out of his reply? In the event of the British Treasury authorizing a provincial government to float a loan in England, is that government, in his opinion, required to obtain the permission of the federal government before approaching the British authorities?

Topic:   PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

So far as I recall, the

constitution of this country authorizes and permits the provinces to make loans anywhere they may desire, and on their own security. We have not endeavoured to exercise any authority over the provinces in connection with loans they may have made or may desire to make, but I think that what the hon. gentleman has in mind is that those who have money to lend have been very anxious that in some way, if money were lent to a province, they should tie the dominion up with it. Thus far they have not succeeded.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON
Permalink
LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (West Edmonton) :

My right hon. friend will remember that during the war period provincial governments could not negotiate loans except by consent of the federal government, and I am curious to know whether the same condition holds to-day with respect to the London market.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The hon. gentleman is

no doubt aware of the fact that the War Measures Act, passed by the parliament of Canada in the emergency of war, dispossessed the provinces of much of the jurisdiction which otherwise would have been solely theirs, and we have the authority of the highest court in the land that the dominion, because of the war emergency, had certain authorities which they no longer possess. This is an instance that very clearly illustrates the different conditions that prevail. The Defence of the Realm Act in England gave to the

The Budget

Mr. Bowman

executive powers to make laws with respect to almost any matter about which they felt they should make laws, and the War Measures Act in this country conferred upon this parliament, and this parliament in turn upon the executive, powers much larger than could possibly be possessed except in case of national emergency, as was pointed out in the Board of Commerce case, by Lord Haldane. I do not think there is the slightest likelihood-at least I hope there is no likelihood-of any such condition again prevailing. At the moment, with the repeal of the War Measures Act, that power disappears as far as the provinces are affected.

Topic:   PROVINCIAL FINANCING IN LONDON
Permalink

May 11, 1934