April 11, 1934

LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

Promissory notes.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Yes, ordinary promissory notes. In the next place, some of those people have made payments, which have gone into the consolidated fund. In some of the other provinces small sums have been refunded as well. I think I gave the committee an illustration last year of an old lady who sent in a very small sum of money because she desired to treat the assistance receiyed as an advance and not as a gift. I think I mentioned that last year, but the amount so

refunded is so insignificant as to be not worthy of mention in connection with a matter of this kind.

I think I should go a step further and say that the notes for hay, feed and seed were of a special character which the provincial legislation dealt with in a definite and specific manner. Under those notes-and I think it will be recalled that some hon. gentlemen directed attention to this fact last year-they took possession of the crop before anyone else could get it. I think some hon. gentlemen opposite directed attention to that fact. That was under the provisions of a provincial statute which dealt with the matter of advances for the purposes indicated, with respect to which the dominion has nothing to do.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

Frederick William Gershaw

Liberal

Mr. GERSHAW:

Mention of the Saskatchewan relief commission brings up a problem which has been very widely discussed in the eastern portion of Alberta, where the people feel they have a very great grievance. As the Prime Minister knows, the constituency of Medicine Hat runs adjacent to the Saskatchewan boundary for two hundred miles. To the east of the boundary relief is administered by a commission, who send men to the various districts and who seem to hand out relief in a sympathetic and almost a generous manner. This is done, of course, because the people in that section have suffered four successive crop failures largely due to the dry winds and drought. But these dry winds do not stop at the interprovincial boundary line; year after year they have also destroyed the crops on the Alberta side of the boundary. In Alberta relief is administered in a very different way. People found that not only were their crops destroyed but their garden crops were failures as well. Some of those who had trucks went to the neighbouring irrigation districts and brought back large loads of fresh vegetables which they distributed free of charge to the people. People in other provinces also generously supplied fresh vegetables to these districts free of cost, and that was greatly appreciated. The people in those districts, however, find difficulty in getting ordinary relief. In that whole strip of country, which is thirty miles wide, there are only two police officers. The people do not have automobiles; they must walk or drive their horses twelve or fifteen miles to find a police officer, and often when they get there he is not at home. Then the officer has to go back with them and investigate the case, and sometimes these officers are hard boiled. If they see chickens or cattle on the farm they feel that

Relief Act, 1934

the man is not destitute and should not get relief. So these people feel they have a grievance, because just across the boundary they see relief administered in a more generous manner.

The merchants of the district also have a complaint. They get very few relief orders. I was talking to a merchant in the Saskatchewan area who said he had two hundred customers, of whom one hundred and ten bring in relief orders, so the people there are thoroughly convinced that there is discrimination in respect to relief as between the two provinces. As the Prime Minister has said, the dominion does not expect to get any money back; usually the province does not expect to get money back, but we find that the municipalities and the improvement districts are trying to get these people to work for their relief. No one objects very much to that, but what relief is given is deducted from the allowances in the improvement districts. I know that this is largely a provincial matter, but according to my information the province has applied to have a relief commission for the eastern part of Alberta, and I hope to convince the minister of the necessity of reviewing the situation in this district.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think, Mr. Chairman, the hon. member for Medicine Hat is not correctly informed as to an effort having been made by the province to appoint a commission in the eastern area of Alberta. The fact is that there is always the difficulty to which the hon. gentleman refers where an imaginary line divides people. I could give some striking illustrations in the older world, and they are not lacking on this continent, where that condition has brought about invidious references to these facts. The truth is that the dominion undertook the responsibility with respect to the area in Saskatchewan, and the province of Alberta set up its own commission. The Alberta relief commission was appointed by order in council dated December 2, 1932, consisting of Mr. A. A. MacKenzie, of Edmonton, as chairman, Colonel G. E. Sanders, of Calgary, and Mr. Robert Livingstone, of Lethbridge. That order in council was passed at the instance, shall I say, of the federal government; it is their commission, and it is regarded as one of the best commissions functioning in the country. The Saskatchewan relief commission is composed of Mr. Henry Black, chairman; Mr. C. B. Daniel, general manager; Mr. W. G. Yule, Mr. A. E. Whitmore, Mr. H. A. Mumms, Mrs. Pearl Johnson, and Mr. Oliver J. Dean,

secretary. In Manitoba, Mr. MacNamara, of the Department of Public Works, was secretary dealing with the matter, and in British Columbia, Mr. Griffith was administrator of the unemployment relief branch.

The representations which have been made by the hon. gentleman would be very proper representations to be made to the province of Alberta. I say to this committee very frankly that the dominion was not unwilling to assume the entire responsibility for administration and everything else in those provinces, and take it over as a dominion matter, but you have to deal with provinces who are not at the moment prepared to forego their autonomy and leave the administration of these matters in the hands of an outside authority. If the representations which the hon. gentleman has made now are successfully made to the government of the province of Alberta the matter will receive every consideration from the federal government as, if and when the request is made.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

William Daum Euler

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

Mr. Chairman, the observations made by the Prime Minister with regard to the division of authority as between the provincial and federal governments impels me to say what I had intended to say at some other time. It seems to me that all the efforts in connection with relief in the last few years, and as contemplated under the bill now before the committee, have been predicated upon the assumption that this is an emergency only. I should like to venture the opinion that while relieving the distress of the unemployed is an emergency in an aggravated form, unemployment has become and will continue to be a more or less permanent factor. One would hope that as the years go by and as we return to a condition of normalcy, as one statesman of the United States called it, there would not be as great a degree of unemployment; that perhaps through the sharing of work, and for other reasons, nearly everybody will have employment. I believe, however, that for some years to come there will continue to be what one might term an irreducible minimum of unemployment, and that that has to be dealt with.

The point I wish to make is this, that if the government has not yet taken any steps in the matter it might very well now, either by the appointment of a commission, or of themselves, make investigations looking to the solution of the problem of providing for the permanently unemployed. The government itself and all hon. members in the house, regardless of their political affiliations,

Relief Act, 1934

have expressed themselves as being in favour of a form of unemployment insurance. I believe it was two sessions ago the Prime Minister said that unemployment insurance was a very difficult matter with which to deal, and that a good deal of time would be required to ascertain all the implications of unemployment insurance. He believed investigations would need to be made so that any legislation brought in would operate properly, under certain actuarial conditions, and so forth. But it seems to me that if the government could see its way clear to appoint a commission, if you like-and one hesitates to advocate the appointment of a commission, because there seems to be a great deal of public antagonism towards the adoption of such a course-it might consider the question from this point of view, namely, that nearly all these social problems ought, in a sense, to be coordinated under one federal control or, at least, under some sort of reasonable system. It might become possible that with unemployment insurance legislation there could be coordinated such things as workmen's compensation, widows' allowances, insurance for ill health, old age pensions, and poor relief. Then, combined with the investigations info the possibility of coordinating these services under federal control, there would of course arise the necessity of dealing with the provinces, because I appreciate that in this connection there is the question of invading their jurisdiction. The Prime Minister has spoken about the difficulty presented by the fact that the provinces are in control of some of these activities. I rise only to say that the government would do well to consider this suggestion, because in the future time might be saved if they at once appointed a commission for the purpose of investigating these matters. There would be many other features besides the ones I have mentioned. For instance, the commission could report to the government as to what form the unemployment insurance should take, whether it should be contributory or non-contributory -although the government is already on record in that connection-as to the proportion which should be paid by employer and empIo3ree; as to the proportion which should be paid by federal, provincial and municipal governments, and where the money should come from to make the payments-bv special tax, or some other method. I am making these references in a more or less indirect way, and have not been particularly definite.

I believe, however, there is merit in the suggestion that the government might now take steps to make these investigations so that at

the earliest possible moment a definite scientific system, if we may call it that, could be evolved and enacted into law at the earliest possible moment.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The question of social

services to be rendered to the people of a country by its government is one which has engaged the attention of peoples for nearly half a century. The burden placed upon governments has increased so greatly that the taxation necessarily imposed to meet the demands is, in some of the provinces, nearly as great as was their whole taxation at the time they came into being. Mothers' allowances, health insurance and old age pensions -and then, of course, there is the Workmen's Compensation Act, which I had intended to deal with separately, because it is more than a social service-all these are administered by the provinces. It will be recalled that the Workmen's Compensation Act is the embodiment of a principle, which principle is that an assessment must be made against industry for the purpose of providing a fund to meet the damage effected by industry to those employed in it. I have used the word "damage" rather than any other word, because actions which used to be taken in the courts were taken to recover damages for injuries. This act provides that a fixed sum shall be taken from industry every month for the purpose of creating a fund to satisfy the claims of those employed in the industry of a particular province. The consumer pays that tax.

Secondly, health insurance, which is part of the modern social insurance of Great Britain and on the continent of Europe, involves the payment of a sum based upon actuarial computations as to the period of illnesses of individuals, to enable a fixed sum per week to be paid, after a given period of illness, to those who are employed in industry. That is largely paid by the consumer. Now we come to old age pensions, and we find that in this country it is paid seventy-five per cent by the federal power and twenty-five per cent by the provincial power, that it is a sum payable to those who have reached the age of seventy years, and that it is paid to the extent of 820 per month. Those payments are made by the consumers, in the form of taxation. Then, lastly, there are mothers' benefits, or benefits which are created by statute to enable those who are deprived of the assistance of their husbands to maintain their children and enable them to give-and I shall use very broad terms-such training as will be sufficient to fit the children for

Relief Act, 1934

life's struggles. That also is paid by the provinces and involves an obligation being placed upon the taxpayers. _

Those are forms of benefit which are paid directly or indirectly by the state to those engaged in industry, to those who have attained a given age or to others who have been deprived of a breadwinner. Then, of course, there is the ordinary, normal relief, which is an obligation placed upon the provinces, and in turn upon the municipalities. In the budgets of every province one could find year after year, long before the years 1929 or 1930, provision for indigents or for the poor, administered-and I am looking at the hon. member for Vancouver Centre-in remote communities such as those in British Columbia, where municipal institutions had not been set up, by the gold commissioner, and administered in the older provinces by municipal councils. This is indigent relief, or poor relief.

There were in this dominion before the depression set in an average of 143,000 people who had to be cared for, during the period they were unable to work, either by the savings they had made or by contributions made by the taxpayers. The hon. member for North Waterloo has pointed out that the number is now much larger. Undoubtedly it is much larger, not solely because of the depression but because of circumstances to which the hon. member for Wetaskiwin referred only the other day. This is the age of machinery; four men are now doing the work that seven did in 1920. The result is that you have to seek employment for that surplus population. For instance, take the everyday business of life which any one of us can recall from the days when we were ten years of age. We see year after year a lessening of the number employed in providing services for our comfort, for our convenience, and shall we say for our pleasure as well.

The hon. gentleman should keep in mind the fact that during all the period through which we have passed an effort has been made to collect such information as would enable us to have a picture of the situation, and we have that picture in a fairly complete way. It will be recalled that in the census we set up special inquiries for the purpose of giving us some idea of what was the situation throughout Canada. We have the reports of trades unions, and we have the reports of the establishments of industry giving us the number of people employed, the capacity for employment, and the extent

to which that capacity has been taken up during the months which have passed. I say with all deference to the committee that that is a fairly simple thing. It requires patience and time and effort, but there is no difficulty in getting it if you take the time and have the patience to do it. That information has been fairly well secured in this country and we have it in fair shape.

However, when you come to deal with the problem of the creation of facilities to meet that situation you are confronted at once with divided jurisdiction. The provinces have exclusive legislative control over the matters mentioned in section 92 of the British North America Act. Unless there is agreement by them all, you will have a situation such as you have to-day with respect to old age pensions.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

Could

not the question of jurisdiction be reviewed?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The hon. gentleman has anticipated what I was going to say. I do not intend this afternoon to enter into a discussion of this matter, because obviously it is neither the time nor the place to do it. But I do say to the committee that there is not the slightest doubt in the world that unless there is a rearrangement of the powers of this parliament and the legislatures of the provinces, in the very nature of things the problem cannot be dealt with. May I say to the hon. gentleman that a commission is not necessary.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

William Daum Euler

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

That was only a suggestion.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

If I have the jurisdiction, I need nothing further in the way of information. I say that very frankly because we have spent enormous effort and considerable time and patience to see that that is available. All I can usefully say to this committee is that I hold a very strong opinion as to the necessity of an early revision of the provisions of the British North America Act. I am not unmindful of the fact, and I trust the committee will always keep this in mind, that sometimes there is an inclination on the part of many of us to be intolerant because of the views expressed by those who do not agree with us as to the desirability or necessity of amending that statute. I should like to remind the committee of what I am sure is in its mind always, that the British North America Act represents a compromise, and compromises are always difficult to change without the consent of all those whose interests may be affected. Every member

Relief Act, 1934

of this committee recognizes that difficulty. I need not go into it at any length, beyond stating that we recognize the difficulty and any steps we may take towards its solution will be taken in such a way as not to strain the mechanism of our existing machinery. When we have accomplished that we will be enabled to embark upon those improvements in our legislation which the circumstances clearly necessitate.

My attention has been directed to the fact that I said that before the depression period there were 143,000 who had to be taken care of, but I might state that that number does not include dependents. If we reckoned the way we do now, the number would be somewhere in excess of 400,000. The information given to me by those who make it their business to study this matter and report upon it as carefully as possible is that 143,000 would be an underestimate. I should have indicated that the 143,000 included only earners and not their dependents.

I am grateful to the hon. member for bringing up this matter, but it is clearly not a matter which we should endeavour to discuss under this measure. I have before me the recommendations which the provinces arrived at with the dominion last spring. I say very frankly to the committee that I had hoped we might be able to dispense with a relief measure this year. At the meeting in January the provinces indicated their views in these words:

That until such time as the large numbers of unemployed throughout Canada have been substantially absorbed, either by improved industrial employment or by federal works, federal assistance to the provinces should be continued on the basis of the provinces dealing with present economic conditions by the distribution of direct relief as provided in the existing agreement between the dominion and the provinces.

That is the conclusion at which the provinces arrived. I have explained how we dealt with these matters. At the conference we stated what the situation was, and each premier made a statement as to the situation in his province. They then retired for the purpose of considering how they could best deal with the difficulties which confronted them, and that is the recommendation they made. It was unanimous, but they expressed the hope, in common with ourselves, that conditions would obviate the expenditure of large sums for relief.

I should like the committee to know that there is a very distinct improvement in this country. I will admit that in the country west of the great lakes it is less apparent than

it is in the east. Shorn of their great reservoir of earnings by reason of a lack of profits, the millions of dollars which are normally available for business are no longer available. That means a diminution of purchasing power, and until there is an improvement in agriculture, in prices and otherwise, it is quite apparent that the general improvement must be delayed. However, in the camps maintained by the Department of National Defence where, as I explained yesterday, the men may leave to take positions in agriculture, industry or otherwise, the number has diminished by substantially 9,000. One industry has reported that during February it had the largest production of any month in its history, and it has been in existence almost since confederation. The same thing has happened in connection with another business. Another significant and striking fact, and one which fills us with the spirit of hope and optimism, is the increase in the production of electrical energy. I always regard these figures as an important factor, electrical energy being used to the extent it is in almost every form of industrial activity in Canada. More kilowatts of electrical energy were produced in February than in any month in the history of Canada.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

Could the right hon. gentleman state how much electrical energy was exported?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

There have been no new customers beyond those mentioned in the order in council produced a few days ago. My memory is that the quantity exported has not changed materially over a period of years. I usually carry these matters in my mind, but for the moment I cannot recall whether there were seven or ten; at any rate, there was a limited number of customers and they have been given permission to purchase and the producing company to sell electricity or gas in this country-natural gas in the far west and electricity in the east- for I think a matter of fifteen years or thereabouts, perhaps a little longer. There has been no substantial change in the matter since then.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Might not the increased consumption of electricity be due to the abandonment of steam rather than to increased industry?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

It well might be, but the fact is that that usually is gradual, and the striking figures with respect to electricity give one at least some cause for hope. Take the harbour of Halifax, which is one of the finest

in the world; the business transacted in that harbour during the month of March was greater than in any year in the history of the port, and that is in itself a striking record.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Samuel Factor

Liberal

Mr. FACTOR:

Why ask for all these extraordinary powers, then?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

A Daniel come to judgment, O most noble Daniel! Perhaps I should not apply the Merchant of Venice's figure of speech, but one hearing that observation is almost inclined to do so; even some of the hon. gentleman's colleagues see the force of it. I merely answer the questions put to me by hon. gentlemen, indicating that we had hoped we might avoid dealing with the matter as we have. The provinces thought otherwise, and after discussing it with them fully we have introduced the measure now before the house. Far from having failed to realize what the hon. member for North Waterloo has referred to, we have endeavoured to accumulate and have accumulated all the information necessary to deal with the problems of social betterment. But we have not yet approached the problem of an amendment to the British North America Act. That is in the offing, and I suppose that in the course of human events, and when an indulgent and grateful electorate have honoured us with their support, we may be able to make such changes as may be necessary.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

William Daum Euler

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

I have no intention of carrying the discussion further at the moment. I brought the matter up merely because of my desire that what is done in an emergency should also be dealt with in a permanent manner, because it will be a continuing emergency, if you care to put it that way. My suggestion of a commission was merely to secure information which the Prime Minister says has already been secured. I am rather surprised to hear that. I realize also the difficulty with regard to conflicting jurisdiction between the provinces and the dominion. I realize that, and that was one of my reasons for bringing the matter up. I am glad I brought it up if only for the fact that we have got from the Prime Minister a statement that he believes the British North America Act should be amended.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Denis

Liberal

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

Mr. Chairman. while accepting as a fact the statement of the right hon. Prime Minister in connection with the improvement of business in this country, could he explain why the government, according to the provisions of section 2, desires unlimited powers to relieve the unemployed? Could he not state the amount necessary to end this crisis from which we

Relief Act, 1934

are suffering for the last three years? Are the requests which he received-either from provinces, municipalities and private or public companies-so numerous that it is impossible for him to state the amount necessary to solve this problem? I wish to inquire from the right hon. Prime Minister whether he can supply us with a list-I do not ask for a complete one, but at least of some of the requests which the government has received heretofor.

'Mr. BENNETT: My hon. friend knows that I follow him with a little difficult}'; I can follow the meaning that attaches to a few of his words and from that, with the help of my friends, I can understand the whole. If I were to produce all the demands made upon us by all companies, municipalities and communities, then I might be within the words of Scripture, in saying that so many books could be written about them that they would be beyond the mind of man to remember. The truth is that we have been inundated with requests for assistance with regard to everything and when we have referred them to the province that usually has been the end of it, for reasons which I think are fairly obvious, especially to my hon. friend from Charlevoix-Saguenay. Under those circumstances I feel I can add nothing to what I have said.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

In connection with the

remarks of the Prime Minister touching the exportation of electricity, did I understand him to say that there were some orders in council laid on the table?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The orders in council

are referred to every year in the departmental report indicating the extent to which exportation has been permitted, and I think you will find in the trade and commerce report the reference to them.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OP RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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April 11, 1934