March 26, 1934

CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

The Ontario board of health inspectors visited them too, did they not?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Yes, not once, but twice, at >my request, to see that the camps were in proper condition. I went to one camp, and I shall just give this as an illustration of the organized malingering. Fifty-two men were engaged in cutting pulpwood by the cord at a price ten per cent higher than that which is provided for under the N.R.A. code in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin and the northeastern part of the United States. That rate prevails both for monthly men and for piece workers all over northern Ontario, in the district represented by my hon. friend as well as that which I have the privilege of representing. These fifty-two men produced in one week 206 cords of pulpwood-a fair

Relief Act, 1934-Mr. Nicholson

average but not up to normal. But when analysis was made of what the men actually did it was found that twenty-one of these men produced 162 cords and thirty-one produced 44 cords out of the 206. Half of the thirty-one men did not produce a cord of wood in a week. Thus it was made impossible for the contractor to operate, and he was defrauded of the money he had advanced for transportation, food and clothing for these men, to the extent that Brownlee Brothers are to-day out of pocket in actual cash in that regard between $6,000 and $7,000. I know it had exceeded $6,000 at the end of January;

I have not the figures for February or March up to date.

But that is not all. The communists work through these camps all the time. I have proof of the fact that when a group of men is put on the train by the employment service at Toronto, or when a group of men is put on at Sudbury, one or two communists get on the train with them and go into the camps. The camps are permeated with them. They continued this from the 30th October to the 15th of January. Then six communists, financed by Vapaus in Sudbury, secured tickets under false pretences, giving false names, from the government employment office and came to Brownlee Brothers' headquarters and were sent to the Jack Pine river on January 9. They hired as pulpwood cutters. They had never cut pulpwood in their lives, and so acknowledged; they knew nothing about it. They stated to travellers on the train that their purpose in going there was finally to tie up Brownlee's work, and bring about a strike if they could. It just happened that I was in the camps on that occasion; I did not know or see the men at that time, but I was there and I knew where these men went on their arrival that night. On January 15, I received a wire in Toronto that the men were leaving Brownlee's camps. I took the first train to Chapleau, from which point I went into the camps by plane to see what was the situation. I arrived on Tuesday, the sixteenth, and as I flew over the tote road I could see the men coming out.

Let me repeat that not a single man employed by Brownlee Brothers ever made any representation that he was dissatisfied with his wages or with the conditions under which he was living or working. After the men had left the camps, however, a series of demands was presented to Brownlee Brothers by a communist who had hired under the name of Riley. This man at times went under the name of Dacko, and as nearly as it is possible to learn his real name was Davis. He

was an ex-convict who had been out on ticket of leave for about a year; his leave had just elapsed. I am not going to take time to read these demands, which cover five pages, but I should like to quote one or two of them. One demand was that Brownlee Brothers undertake to secure the release of seven communists from Kingston penitentiary. Another was that they secure the repeal of section 98 of the criminal code, and another was that they undertake to recognize all workers' organizations, including the communist party. Finally they demanded that if the work were to be carried on in these camps the company had to undertake to agree to allow the workers' unity league, as it was called there, to organize camp committees, such committees to say where the men would work, how they would work, how the timber should be cut and so on, and no man was to be disciplined or removed without the consent of the committee. Let me say in passing, Mr. Speaker, that I have something, though not all, to do with Brownlee Brothers. When the time comes for the communists to say how the work is going to be carried on, then instead of using their funds to destroy industry in this country they will have to use their funds to finance industry.

It was stated, as my hon. friend has stated, that there was a strike. I say to you now, sir, and I know whereof I speak, that there never was a strike of any kind. Men were jumping, to use the expression used in the lumbering industry; they were walking out without saying why they were going or anything else. It is true that on January 15 and 16 these communists succeeded in getting a larger number to leave, but, as I say, they made no representations to their employers as to any changes they might desire. These communists were not employees of Brownlee Brothers in any sense whatever. They were there under false pretences, and if I had my way the law of this country would be changed in. order that these men could be put behind the bars, where they belong, for that sort of thing. Of a total of 561 men, 228 walked out. I had occasion to meet the men at their headquarters; I mingled with them, and I saw men whom I have known for years being led around by the nose by a group of men whose only purpose in this world is to destroy the opportunity for Canadian citizens to earn a living. One of the communists, who is now in gaol, had broken his parole in order to participate in this disorganization of industry in northern Ontario. He came out ahead of the men and came to the town of Chapleau. He had enough money to hire a large hotel;

Relief Act, 1934-Mr. Nicholson

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Go ahead.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

The Canadian Bushmen's Union sets this out:

The organization issuing this information is Canadian first and last. It is registered under the Dominion Trade Unions Act and affiliated with all Canadian unions in a National Canadian Labour Congress. Its members have complete liberty of conscience in matters political and religious. Their organization is not

interested in industrial strife and upheaval. It wants peace in industry, intelligent discussion, and goodwill manifested regarding workers' problems, and a fair deal.

Then these men say: .

A strike should always be the last, not the first resort.

Every man who has any knowledge of how organized labour has worked and built up an organization knows that that is a fact. They present their grievances to their employers and negotiate for an agreement. But these people never let the employer know what they are going to do. The men are induced to leave the woods without saying why they are going, or anything about it.

Then, just one other point to show the lengths to which these so-called worker's organizations will go. In the Port Arthur-Fort William area last year they went the distance of closing the national highway. With this in mind they placed pickets on the highways leading out in every direction from Port Arthur and Fort William, and unless one carried a permit from communist headquarters he was not allowed to pass. I have in my hand three photostati'c copies of such permits, all signed by the same man, D. Makela, one of the men who came to tie up the operations of Brownlee Brothers. The certificate reads that so and eo may pass over the highway. These people went further than that; they closed the stables and barns of two or three lumber companies, and would not allow anybody to enter the barns in order to feed the horses. The humane society intervened.

These are the methods by which they preach [DOT]peace in this country. Here are three cards which any member may see. I had an oppor-, tinity of discussing the situation with the management of a pulp and paper industry in northern Ontario which controls certain mills. They have 175,000 cords of pulpwood to be driven down the stream to their mills, and these ^people have been working and organizing for the purpose of making the drives impossible. The result would be that-the mills will be closed down. They will do it in every other part of the country if they can.

One last word. As a result of their efforts to-day in British Columbia the logging industry is virtually tied up, and the mills in Vancouver are forced to buy their logs from Washington and Oregon and tow them up the Pacific coast, so as to be able to fill their contracts in Australia, the orient and the United Kingdom. The possible and almost probable result is that the operations of these people will defeat the very thing which for so

Relief Act, 1934-Mr. Bradette

long we have been fighting for. We were supported by our government in that fight, and were able to open up a market for a thousand million feet of lumber, and to give employment to 50,000 men in Canada. These people are determined to make that impossible. I personally know an eastern lumber operator who has been forced to cancel cargoes of lumber from eastern Canada because of this very thing, and that is the kind of thing, Mr. Speaker, that hon. members of this house will assist by their irresponsible prattle both in the house and out of it with regard to these conditions.

Mr. JOSEPH A. BRADETTE (North Timiskaming): It is easy to note, Mr. Speaker, that my hon. friend for East Algoma (Mr. Nicholson) is still posing as a moralist in this country. He is bent on throwing out insinuations and innuendoes against the reputation of hon. members.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

John Smith Stewart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Lethbridge):

His reputation is as high as yours.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Are you a judge of that? I have not said anything to the hon. member (Mr. Stewart), and I shall not because it is not my habit to do so. In 1926 my hon. friend from East Algoma was moralizing on the whole civil service. He said something during that campaign which no decent man would ever have said.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Would you like me to read it?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Yes, I would.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

With the Speaker's

consent I will. This is the third time since 1930 that I have been challenged with regard to that so-called statement. I hold in my hand a copy of Maclean's magazine, dated July 15, 1926. I spoke for five minutes at North Bay on the occasion to which my hon. friend has referred, and I then held in my hand the same copy of Maclean's magazine that I am holding now. At page 16 of that magazine will be found an article written by H. Napier Moore.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

John Ritchie MacNicol

Conservative (1867-1942)

The ACTING SPEAKER (Mr. MacNicol):

I shall have to rule the hon. member out of order.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Then I shall have to take another opportunity of gratifying the curiosity of my hon. friend. But I am rising now, Mr. Speaker, to a question of privilege. The hon. member for North Timiskaming has stated that I made a statement at North Bay that no decent man would make, and he challenged me to repeat it. Mr. Moore, whom

I have never had the privilege of meeting, wrote an article for Maclean's magazine entitled "Wanted: Clean Government," and I am only going to read some of the extracts that I read on that occasion:

Mr. King was compelled to resign because sufficient Progressives made an emphatic gesture in behalf of wholesome administration. Mr. Meighen's first and most important vote was obtained on the question of wholesome administration. However much the politicians may clack their tongues about constitutionali-ties-important in themselves-to the advantage or disadvantage of this or that party, the underlying issue which necessitated a new election was, and still is, that of clean government. No amount of hustings ballyhooing, no amount of logicians' hair-splitting, no amount of frenzied flag-waving can alter that fact. . . .

Stripped of all political camouflage, the sober fact is that the ship of state piloted by Mr. King foundered on the rocks of corruption. Admitted that the Conservative board of strategy forged a political weapon when the gravity of the customs report was apparent-

Then further on:

The plea has been made that the officials of the King government were no worse than their predecessors. That is for the judicial commission to decide. . . .

In short, the first minister of the land sacrificed the honour of Canada to political expediency.

Then, when at last he realized that exposure was certain, he "got rid of" a discredited minister by appointing him to the Senate-an insult to that body-an act which placarded the upper chamber as a haven for a former minister of the crown who stands charged with debauching his subordinates, a minister who hobnobbed with crooks and despoilers of the treasury, a minister whose conduct is described by investigators as being unspeakable.

There is no need to harp on the tactics of certain of the other members of the King cabinet. One former minister already has been censured by a vote of the house. The evidence presented to parliament speaks for itself. The evidence in the investigators' reports as yet not made public discloses vileness that cannot lie referred to in a family magazine.

That is exactly what I referred to at North Bay, Mr. Speaker. It is the only thing I said', and if that is any satisfaction to my hon. friend he is welcome to it.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

The hon. member may have said that at North Bay, but he said something else. He made allusions to the civil service-they were all bawdy houses.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Certainly he was wrong.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

He never said it.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Yes, he said it, and no wonder he tried to take it out of that statement. It is evidently in the minds of all hon. members that he said it in 1926.

Relief Act, 1934-Mr. Bradette

I have not a single word to retract of what I said on strikes in northern Ontario during the debate on the address, or of what I said last Thursday. I placed the situation fairly and squarely before the house and the country, and I will leave it to the people of my section to judge my statement. The hon. member for Bast Algoma tried to insinuate that I was in sympathy with the communists.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

Who says "hear, hear"?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

I do.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   BILL IN TERMS GENERALLY OF RELIEF ACT, 1933, WITH PROVISION RESPECTING DELAYED RELIEF ACCOUNTS
Permalink

March 26, 1934