January 30, 1934

CITY OF OTTAWA AGREEMENT


Hon. H. A. STEWART (Minister of Public Works) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following proposed resolution: That, it is expedient to authorize the Minister of Public Works, on behalf of His Majesty, to enter into an agreement with the corporation of the city of Ottawa to extend the period of the existing agreement with the corporation for one year from July 1, 1933. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subj ect matter of this resolution, recommends it to the favourable consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre) :

Mr. Speaker, I asked a question yesterday concerning the Vancouver harbour commission which the minister said he might be in a better position to answer to-day. I should like his answer at this time.

Topic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ALFRED DURANLEAU (Minister of Marine):

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry to say that I have not the exact information before me. I have not yet, nor has my department, received any resignation from the Vancouver harbour commissioners. However I should like to inquire further.

Topic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR COMMISSION
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WHEAT AGREEMENT

LIMITATION OF ACREAGE TO BE SOWN IN WESTERN CANADA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. E. J. YOUNG (Weyburn):

Mr. Speaker,

I should like to ask the Prime Minister if a circular is being issued in regard to the wheat agreement, and if so whether or not a copy will be laid on the table?

Topic:   WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   LIMITATION OF ACREAGE TO BE SOWN IN WESTERN CANADA
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I believe a pamphlet has been issued jointly between the government of the western provinces and the dominion, and is being circulated by the provinces.

I shall inquire if there are any copies available, and if so will lay them on the table.

Topic:   WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   LIMITATION OF ACREAGE TO BE SOWN IN WESTERN CANADA
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SURVEY OF NATIONAL PORTS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Minis-

The Address-Mr. Bennett

ter of Marine (Mr. Duranleau) whether or not it is the intention of the government to introduce a bill concerning harbours, along the lines recommended in the report of the Gibb commission?

Topic:   SURVEY OF NATIONAL PORTS
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ALFRED DURANLEAU (Minister of Marine):

Mr. Speaker, the matter is under consideration.

Topic:   SURVEY OF NATIONAL PORTS
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LIB

GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed from Monday, January 29, consideration of the motion of Mr. Gobeil for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Mackenzie King.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, we listened with

much interest to the observations made yesterday by the right hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King), and his well deserved tributes to the mover and seconder of the address in reply to the speech from the throne. It is true that neither of them was a new member of the house. One of them is a new member of this parliament; the other is an older parliamentarian. The practice that has grown up and has now become traditional, by which a member of one of the two great races in this country moves the address one year and a member of the other race the next year, has been maintained both here and in another place during all these years, and I believe that it is conducive to a better understanding between the peoples that constitute this dominion. I should like to join if I might in congratulating the members who have spoken on the character of the addresses they have delivered. It was to be expected that one who had been so closely associated with the growth and development of the eastern townships and was familiar with the problems of those who till the soil, and also that one who had been so familiar with the development of the delta region near the Fraser river in British Columbia, would be able to speak with some authority, and these two members have well warranted our hopes and expectations in that regard.

When, however, I heard the right hon. leader of the opposition condole with the government over the results of the by-elections, I could not but reflect that the government as it stands to-day has exactly the majority that it had when this house was returned. It is true that there was a byelection in South Huron which was carried by the party that secured the seat at the general election. The Dutch have again taken Holland, and Huron still remains a Liberal constituency.

It is true that a Liberal continues to represent Yamaska. He was elected at the general election by one vote. It is also true that the rotes polled at the general eleotion amounted to 709 fewer than those polled at the byelection, when his majority was 84. Therefore on the vote that was polled in the general election he was defeated by 625 votes-

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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January 30, 1934