May 4, 1933

STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AS TO LEGISLATION TO BE BROUGHT DOWN


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

I promised yesterday, Mr. Speaker,

that I would advise the house as to whether or not it was the intention of the government to proceed with the redistribution bill. It is proposed to proceed with that bill at once. The other bills on the order paper will be proceeded with also, with the possible exception of the bill dealing with admiralty courts, which may not be proceeded with this session in view of the fact that the shipping bill is not being pressed. The arrangement made in 1926, 1929 and 1930 with respect to shipping contemplated uniform bills throughout the British Empire. It was felt that when the statute of Westminster was passed and admiralty courts acts were adopted by the various dominions we would have a fair measure of uniformity having regard to the different conditions existing in the various dominions, but the shipping acts themselves, modelled on the Merchant Shipping Act, would be similar for reasons that I fancy I need not state in this house.

That was the view taken at the Imperial conference in 1926, and again in 1929 and 1930. Inasmuch as there has been no legislation of that character passed as yet by the other dominions the matter is further under consideration; the shipping bill is not being proceeded with and a further opportunity will be given to study the various provisions of our act and other acts that may be drafted by the other dominions in order that we may carry out the understanding agreed upon at the imperial conferences and the drafting committee conference in 1929. The Admiralty Court Act, therefore, following on that, wiK not be passed. The other bills on the ordei paper will be proceeded with whenever the opportunity offers. There is one other matter, namely, a short bill to grant the governor in council power to extend the duration of the New Zealand treaty beyond the 24th day of May of this year, when it expires. There is the French trade agreement, if an agreement is submitted to the house to be dealt with, and there is an amendment to the Excise Act which cannot be submitted until after the budget provisions have been entirely adopted, because they contain administrative machinery dealing with legislation that has been and will be considered by the house with respect to the budget. At the moment, after conferring with my colleagues, I do not think there is any other legislation except an amendment; to

Coal Inquiry

the Tariff Board Act-a short amendment- which will not give my hon. friend from Wey-burn (Mr. Young) any work. There is the Coastal Shipping Act, which is now in the Senate and which will be brought down to this chamber, and there is also an amendment to the Insurance Act, in connection with certain investments, which by accident was left out of the bill last year. That Senator Beau-bien has in the Senate and it will be submitted to this chamber in due course. I think there are some other private bills in the Senate, but apart from what I have mentioned there is no new legislation contemplated. The Soldier Settlement bill is on the order paper. The redistribution schedules will be completed as early as possible, and if unfortunately agreement cannot be arrived at in the committee, the committee will report the bill to the house and we shall have to endeavour to arrive at some conclusions with respect to legislation.

I may say that I have placed on the order paper for Monday next a notice suggesting that the house meet on Tuesday at eleven o'clock, but that is entirely in the hands of the house; whatever the house may desire in that regard, we shall be glad to accommodate our views thereto. It is also contemplated that the house shall sit on Wednesday evening next.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AS TO LEGISLATION TO BE BROUGHT DOWN
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LIB

Joseph Philippe Baby Casgrain

Liberal

Mr. CASGRAIN:

Is it the intention to bring in some amendments to the Shipping Act with respect to coastal trade?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AS TO LEGISLATION TO BE BROUGHT DOWN
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

That is what I mentioned. That bill is now in the Senate.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT BY PRIME MINISTER AS TO LEGISLATION TO BE BROUGHT DOWN
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EXCHEQUER COURT ACT


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ernest Lapointe

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Does the Prime Minister intend to proceed with Bill No. 26, to amend the Exchequer Court Act? The reason I ask that question is that the Minister of Justice, before leaving, had intimated to me that it was not the intention to proceed with that bill.

Topic:   EXCHEQUER COURT ACT
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

The Minister of Justice gave me to understand that he had indicated that it was not thought desirable to proceed with the Admiralty Court bill. I spoke to my colleague to-day and asked him to call the bill for committee for the purpose of hearing what observations the former Minister of Justice had to make on the matter, and we would then determine what action should be

taken. If the Minister of Justice indicated that we would not proceed with it, we will certainly carry out the undertaking he gave.

Topic:   EXCHEQUER COURT ACT
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COAL INQUIRY


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Frederick George Sanderson

Liberal

Mr. F. G. SANDERSON (South Perth):

I have a question to ask the Minister of Labour with regard to the report of the registrar appointed under the Combines Investigation Act with respect to the inquiry into importation and distribution of British anthracite coal. Yesterday the minister made some remark touching Ithis question, ,and according to Hansard he said that the report was not to be made public; yet I find in yesterday's press, in the Toronto Globe of yesterday-

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Will the hon. member

proceed with his question?

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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LIB
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member must not read from newspapers.

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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LIB

Frederick George Sanderson

Liberal

Mr. SANDERSON:

I have not read anything, but in the Toronto Globe, in great headlines, it is reported that importers-

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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CON
LIB

Frederick George Sanderson

Liberal

Mr. SANDERSON:

-are using the duty to overcharge users of British fuel, and then it mentions an hon. member of the other house, the salary he has been getting-

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Question.

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

To ask a question it is

not necessary to retail to the house what appears in newspaper's.

Topic:   COAL INQUIRY
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May 4, 1933