January 30, 1933

GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF ADDRESS IN REPLY

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received a message from His Excellency the Governor General, signed by his own hand, reading as follows:

I have received with great pleasure the address you have voted in reply to my speech at the opening of parliament, and thank you for it sincerely.

Bessborough.

Government House,

Ottawa.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF ADDRESS IN REPLY
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THE LATE MR. MAXIME D. CORMIER

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr, Speaker, it has been said that death loves a shining mark. If that be true, we in this house have since the adjournment had striking evidence illustrating the force of that observation. Little did any of us, when we left here a few short weeks ago, think one of our number, Mr. Maxime D. Cormier, member for Restigouche-Madawaska, would have passed from this world. Nevertheless, such is the case.

A young man of great, indeed, of more than ordinary promise, has been called from us. He had a career that exemplifies fully what may be achieved by honest effort. He was descended from a family that came to this country over two and a half centuries ago. He early conceived the idea of making for himself a place in the public life of the country, and, settling in Edmundston, although bom in the county of Westmorland, New Brunswick, identified himself with every local movement in that community. He was principal of the school and, subsequently admitted to the bar, he filled practically all the offices that might be filled by a member of the profession in the capital town of that county. He was judge of probate, clerk of the supreme court and clerk of the county court. In the fulness of time he offered himself as a candidate for

The late Mr. Cormier

the suffrage of his fellows. He was defeated, but in the election of 1930 he was returned to this house.

He had many qualities that endeared him to those who were privileged to know him well. I am told by one of his colleagues who was present at his funeral, that the manifestation of real sorrow and grief on the part of thousands of people who gathered there that day to pay their last earthly tribute to one of their number, was indeed striking, he had not seen anything like it before.

Mr. Cormier had a genial disposition and readily accommodated himself to the difficulties that arose by reason of the fact that he represented a constituency in which lived, in almost equal numbers, representatives of the two great races. Everyone spoke well of him in his desire to do justice and deal fairly with the claims of all persons regardless of race or religion, and to have attained the position of singular confidence he enjoyed in his community was well worth the effort of a lifetime. We shall miss him because of his kindly disposition, because of his buoyant optimism, because he represented the admixture of fairness and justice so essential in dealing with the many problems that confront legislators and others in this country. I ask you, sir, to convey to the sorrowing wife and children the expressions of sympathy of this chamber in the great loss they have sustained.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. MAXIME D. CORMIER
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of >the Opposition):

Personally, and

on behalf of the Liberal members of the opposition, I desire to express to the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) and to hon. gentlemen opposite, our sincere sympathy in the loss which they and their party have sustained through the death of the late member for Restigouche-Madawaska, Mr. Maxime Cormier.

Having entered parliament so recently, Mr. Cormier was just coming to be known to many of the members. Those of us who had the pleasure of his acquaintance will appreciate how considerable is the loss sustained by those whose interests he sought to serve; and how merited the tribute which has just been paid his memory by the Prime Minister.

We join with other members of this house in the desire to have the expression of its sympathy conveyed to Madame Cormier and the members of her family, who have been so suddenly and so greatly bereaved.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. MAXIME D. CORMIER
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. ROBERT GARDINER (Acadia):

Mr. Speaker, may I on behalf of those who sit in this comer of the house join in the tribute which has been paid to our late colleague,

Mr. Cormier, by the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) and the leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King). Although Mr. Cormier had been a member of this house only since the election of 1930, I am sure all hon. members will join sincerely in the tribute which the Prime Minister has paid to his memory.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. MAXIME D. CORMIER
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RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT


Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster) moved for leave to introduce a bill to amend the Railway Act (rates on grain).


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

This bill contains one clause

proposing that the parliament of Canada grant to British Columbia the same freight rates on grain for domestic purposes as those enjoyed by eastern points. It is a simple clause.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

No copy of the bill has

been filed as yet, and its first reading will have to be postponed until the bill is forthcoming.

Motion stands.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
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EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT


Mr. S. C. ROBINSON (West Essex) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 14, to amend the Export Act. Some hon. MEMBERS-: Explain.


CON

Sidney Cecil Robinson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROBINSON:

The object of this bill is, by repealing section 8 of the Export Act, to restore to the revenues of Canada the large amount of revenue lost by its enactment, and to open the way by international treaty or convention for reciprocal duties and obligations on the part of the two governments concerned. It is also an effort to help the serious unemployment situation in Canada, and to assist in the prevention of smuggling.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


MARIA, QUE., INDIAN AGENT

LIB

Mr. MARCIL:

Liberal

1. Has Edmund Nadeau, Indian agent of Maria Indian Reserve, been dismissed? If so, for what reason?

2. Who was appointed in his place, and was the appointment a temporary or permanent one?

3. Has the appointment of Mr. Nadeau's successor been confirmed, and if not, who is now in charge of the agency?

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MARIA, QUE., INDIAN AGENT
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LIB

Mr. MURPHY:

Liberal

1. Yes. For political partisanship.

2. Rev. J. A. W. Provencher was appointed temporarily.

3. No. Mr. J. Adhemar Cyr.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MARIA, QUE., INDIAN AGENT
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January 30, 1933