November 25, 1932

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF

CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Labour; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

I desire to lay on the table of the house certains orders in council passed pursuant to the relief measures.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk). STEAMSHIP CYMBELINE INVESTIGATION*


CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

I have received verbal information to the effect that the investigation has been terminated, but as yet no report has been received by the department. However, it is expected that this will be forthcoming in a few days. The answers to the last two questions will be in the negative.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-MISS RUTH EDWARDS-MISS MARGUERITE GIRARD

CON

Mr. GAGNON:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was one Miss Ruth Edwards employed in the Department of Agriculture at Ottawa since 1920?

2. If so, how long did she work in Ottawa?

3. Has she been transferred to Montreal?

4. If so. for what reason?

5. Did the department try to send her to the maritime provinces before transferring her to Montreal?

0. Who recommended such a transfer to the Civil Service Commission?

7. What reasons were alleged for such a transfer?

8. Did the department consider, before making such a transfer, that the transfer of Miss Edwards was preventing promotion of other employees?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-MISS RUTH EDWARDS-MISS MARGUERITE GIRARD
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CON

Mr. WEIR (Melfort): (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Yes: Miss Ruth Edward (not Edwards) was employed at Ottawa.

2. In the Department of Agriculture from November, 1918, to June, 1919, and continuously from October, 1919, to July, 1929.

3. Yes.

4. (a) There was need in Montreal for one seed analyst thoroughly proficient in the English language, the former English-speaking analyst having died, (b) Miss Edward's parental home is in Montreal, (c) The work at Ottawa had decreased because of the establishment of a laboratory in each of the maritime and Quebec inspection districts and the transfer to these laboratories of work formerly done at Ottawa.

5. No.

6. The Deputy Minister of Agriculture on the recommendation of the seed commissioner.

7. Answered by No. 4. *

8. No. The established position occupied by Miss Edward in the Ottawa laboratory was also transferred to Montreal.

Question's

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-MISS RUTH EDWARDS-MISS MARGUERITE GIRARD
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CON

Mr. GAGNON:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was one Miss Marguerite Girard employed in the Department of Agriculture, seed branch, Montreal, in the province of Quebec?

2. If so, since when?

3. In what capacity?

4. What salary did she receive?

5. Was she recommended to the Civil Service Commission by the Department of Agriculture in 1931 and 1932 to be employed in Montreal?

6. If so, who signed the recommendation for the Department of Agriculture?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-MISS RUTH EDWARDS-MISS MARGUERITE GIRARD
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CON

Mr. WEIR (Meifort): (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Yes.

2. Each seed testing season since January, 1926.

3. January 4, 1926, to May 15, 1926, temporary junior seed analyst; December 20, 1926-April 30, 1927, permanent-seasonal junior seed analyst; January 9, 1928-June 30, 1928, permanent seasonal junior seed analyst; December 17, 1928-April 30, 1929, permanent-seasonal junior seed analyst; January 7, 1930-July 6, 1930, temporary seed analyst; January 12, 1931-July 11, 1931, temporary seed analyst; March 1, 1932-May 31, 1932, temporary seed analyst and junior seed analyst.

4. 1st season, S65 per month; 2nd season, $65 per month increased to $75 per month; 3rd season, $75 per month; 4th season, $75, increased to $80 per month; 5th season, $100 per month; 6th season, $100 per month; 7th season, $100 per month as seed analyst for one month, $65 per month as junior seed analyst for two months (less 10 per cent).

5. Yes.

6. Dr. J. H. Grisdale, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-MISS RUTH EDWARDS-MISS MARGUERITE GIRARD
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QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN


Mr. LaVERGNE: How many superior officers in the Canadian merchant marine are Canadian citizens or native Canadians, and how many were born in foreign countries or in Great Britain?


CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I have endeavoured to

obtain these names but if the hon. member will be satisfied to allow this question to stand as an order for return I will bring down the return later on.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIAN MERCHANT MARINE-SUPERIOR OFFICERS
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INCOME WAR TAX ACT


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker, I think it well to state

that in view of the representations which have been made during the last few days in connection with Bill No. 11, notably a request from the board of trade sent by way of a telegram received yesterday and asking that further consideration of this bill be deferred until January 30 in order that they may have an opportunity to make representations, we will leave this bill on the order paper until January 30. I have conferred with the commissioner of income tax who informs me that no public interest will in any sense be injured by reason of this bill standing until that date. I believe there is a misapprehension upon the part of the Toronto Board of Trade, but in view of the shortness of time we thought that no injury would be done if the -bill stood until January 30.

Topic:   INCOME WAR TAX ACT
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REDISTRIBUTION BILL

READJUSTMENT OF REPRESENTATION IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved the second reading of Bill No. 2, to readjust the representation in the House of Commons. He said: In moving the second reading of Bill No. 2, to readjust the representation in the House of Commons, I think it is necessary only to point out that the bill corresponds identically, except as to dates, with chapter 63 of the statutes of 1924. It is identical also with the bill introduced by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King) in 1923 when Prime Minister, except as to section 4 which has been amended to meet the changed conditions with respect to population. It might be pointed out that the practice of introducing this bill in this form commenced in 1903 when the late Sir Wilfrid Laurier brought in a bill which set forth the number of members to which the provinces would be entitled under redistribution, it being left- to the house to determine the boundaries of the constituencies. This matter was very fully dealt with by the right hon. gentleman opposite when he introduced a bill in 1923, and I do not think any good purpose will be served by repeating the statements then made except to say that the practice commenced by Sir Wilfried Laurier in 1903 has been followed in subsequent redistribution measures. The old contest in the House of Commons over the boundaries of constituencies which Redistribution-Mr. Bennett represented the views of the government of the day, has not taken place since 1903. In this instance, it is proposed to proceed exactly as has been done since 1903. It will be recalled that the British North America Act provided that ait Confederation the number of members in the House of Commons would be 181-this is covered by section 37-and that the method by which increases were to be made as provided by the constitution is covered by section 51, which reads: On the completion of the census in the year cue thousand eight hundred and seventy-one, and of each subsequent decennial census, the representation of the four provinces shall be readjusted by such authority, in such manner, and from such time as the parliament of Canada from time to time provides, subject and according to the following rules: (1) Quebec shall have a fixed number of sixty-five members; (2) There shall be assigned to each of the other provinces such a number of members as will bear the same proportion to tile number of its population (ascertained at such census) as the number sixty-five bears to the number of the population of Quebec (so ascertained) ; (3) In the computation of the number of members for a province a fractional part not exceeding one-half of the whole number requisite for entitling the province to a member shall be disregarded; but a fractional part exceeding one-half of that number shall be equivalent to the whole number; (4) On any such readjustment the number of members for a province shall not be reduced unless the proportion which the number of the population of the province bore to the number of the aggregate population of Canada at the then last preceding readjustment of the number of members for the province is ascertained at the then latest census to be diminished by one-twentieth part or upwards; (5) Such readjustment shall not take effect until the termination of the then existing parliament. It will be observed that the unit of representation is ascertained by dividing sixty-five, the constant number of members from Quebec, into the population of that province. Inasmuch as the boundaries of the province of Quebec were extended in 1912, it was provided, in order that the other provinces might not feel that they had been unfairly dealt with, that the population into which sixty-five would be divided would be the population of old Quebec, that is, the population within the area of the provinces as it was at confederation. The effects of the present census are set forth in the notes to the bill. It might be well to indicate the populations of the provinces under the census of 1931, which were as follows: Prince Edward Island 88,038 Nova Scotia 512,846 New Brunswick 408,219 Ontario 3,431,683 Manitoba 700,139 Saskatchewan 921,785 Alberta 731,605 British Columbia 694,263 Quebec (without new Quebec).. 2,872,078 The population of new Quebec is given at 2,177. The total population into which sixty-five is to be divided is 2,872,078, and the result of that division is a quotient of 44,186, which constitutes the unit of representation. By dividing the population which I have indicated for the different provinces with this unit of representation, we have the representation to which each province is entitled. However, there are two exceptions which must be borne in mind. The first is found in subsection four of section 51 of the British North America Act, to which I have just directed attention. This deals with the diminution in population and provides that where the change in population does not exceed one-twentieth, there shall be no change, but where it does exceed one-twentieth, it is competent to reduce the number of members. The second exception is to be found in the provisions of the constitutional amendment of 1915. It will be recalled that after Prince Edward Island came into confederation, the number of senators from the three maritime provinces remained at twenty-four. Two senators were taken from New Brunswick and two from Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island was then given four senators, so that Nova Scotia had ten; New Brunswick, ten and Prince Edward Island, four. But it was provided in 1915, in consequence of the representations so strongly urged in the house at that time, that a change should be. made by amending the constitution and, as a result of the amendment which was made it was provided that the representation in the House of Commons should never be less than that in the Senate. So Prince Edward Island, which would be entitled to only two members, is, by reason of the operation of that provision, entitled to four and the province of New Brunswick that would be entitled to only nine members, under the rule set forth in section 51 of the British North America Act, will be entitled to ten members because it has a representation of ten in the Senate. There-


November 25, 1932