October 26, 1932

QUESTION PASSED AS ORDER FOR RETURN


Mr. LaVERGNE: 1. Has the Marine department sold dredges since 1926? 2. If so, which ones, what was paid for each of them, and what are the names of the purchasers? 3. What reasons are given for said sales? 4. Are said dredges still in the service of private contractors?


MOTION FOR PAPER

LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

For a copy of all correspondence, including letters, telegrams, memoranda or other documents exchanged between any member of the federal government or any official thereof and the representative of any grain exchange, commission firm, farm grain marketing organization. or other interested western body, on the subject of wheat preferences or quotas, in relation to the recent economic conference at Ottawa.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PAPER
Sub-subtopic:   WHEAT PREFERENCES OR QUOTAS
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UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked the

Minister of Labour a question in regard to the policy of the government concerning unemployment relief this winter, and at the time he made a very acceptable statement. He did not, however, exactly answer my question. It was this: When does the minister think he can submit to the house a statement outlining the exact policy, the relations between this government, the provinces and the municipalities in order to take care of the unemployment situation during the coming winter?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Labour; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. W. A. GORDON (Minister of Labour):

The question asked is obviously one that should not and probably could not be answered. The policy this government will adopt will be made manifest from time to time and a statutory report will be made as contemplated by the statute.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

The minister told us yesterday, in this connection, that no one need suffer. There are in my own city today thousands who are suffering, and I think the policy of the government will have to be announced in the very near future or the situation in the west will be very serious.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER :

Is the hon. member asking a question?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

May I ask the

minister how soon the needy of my own city and other western cities are going to be cared for? Does this mean that I am to have no reply whatever to a very reasonable question?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Labour; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

If I am assured that the

hon. member is through, I will be very glad to reply to him. So far as the needy in the city of Winnipeg are concerned, as in all other cities, if the responsible officials of the city of Winnipeg and the responsible governmental officers of the province of Manitoba find they are unable to carry the burden of taking care of those who are unable to take care of themselves in regard to food, fuel, clothing and shelter, and make representations to this government, then this government is prepared to take appropriate action to see that no one suffers.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
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DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

During recent

months two hon. members of the government have spent a good deal of time in Europe attending the Disarmament conference. I should like to know whether this house may expect to receive from either or both of those gentlemen a report on the proceedings of the Disarmament conference, some indications as to how matters now stand, and also as to the representations made on behalf of Canada at the conference?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE
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CON

George Halsey Perley (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE PERLEY (Acting Secretary of State):

The Disarmament conference report is being prepared and is just about ready to be given to the Prime Minister as Secretary of State for External Affairs. I need not remind my right hon. friend that the Disarmament conference has not yet concluded. It is expected to meet again in the near future and this report can be only in the nature of an interim one.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE
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WHEAT SHIPMENTS


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker, a question has been

raised as to the interpretation to be placed upon the provisions of the Import Duties Act passed by the parliament of the United Kingdom on March 1, 1932. It will perhaps be recalled that subsection 2 of section 4 of that act reads:

(2) In the case of goods which are showD to the satisfaction of the commissioners-

Wheat Shipments

That is, the Commissioners of Customs and Excise.

-to have been consigned from any part of the British Empire and grown, produced or manufactured in any country to which this section applies, neither the general ad valorem duty nor any additional duty shall be chargeable until the fifteenth day of November, nineteen hundred and thirty-two, or if a later date is fixed for the purposes of this section by resolution of the commons house of parliament either generally or as respects any particular country, then, in eases to which the resolution applies, until that date.

The government has received inquiries as to whether cr not goods consigned through another country to Great Britain would receive the preference, and having satisfied ourselves as to what the position was, we verified it so that it is now abundantly clear that the mere transit of Canadian goods through the United States, for instance, would not be a barrier to the granting of an imperial preference, .provided that the goods are definitely consigned from Canada to the United Kingdom and that satisfactory evidence of through consignment is produced. The preference, however, would not be granted in the United Kingdom to such gocds if they were sent from Canada to say, the United States and then reconsigned from there. The conditions under which imports to the United Kingdom are governed may be found in regulation No. 12 of the customs regulations issued by the United Kingdom, as follows:

12. When empire goods consigned to Great Britain or Northern Ireland have been transshipped en route, or have been shipped from a foreign port after overland transit from the empire country of origin, the importer at the time of making entry will be required to produce the through bill of lading or railway consignment note from the country of production to Great Britain or Northern Ireland in support of the certificate of origin. Where a through bill of lading or consignment note is not available, the invoice, local bill of lading or consignment note from the original point of origin, and a certificate of arrival or landing at, and exportation from, the port of transshipment will be required. Such certificates are to be signed by the proper colonial or foreign customs officer at the port of transshipment, and in the case of the latter the signature must be visaed by the British consular authority. It is essential to prove that the goods urere consigned from a part of the empire to Great Britain or Northern Ireland, and not to a foreign country from which they were subsequently reconsigned to Great Britain or Northern Ireland.

That, hon. members will observe, is but an expansion in terms of the conditions of the statute, providing that goods to receive free entry into the United Kingdom must originate within the empire and be consigned to the United Kingdom.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT SHIPMENTS
Sub-subtopic:   INTERPRETATION OF PROVISIONS OF BRITISH IMPORT DUTIES ACT, 1932
Permalink
LIB

James Layton Ralston

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Shelburne-Yar-mouth):

Arising out of the Prime Minister's statement, may I ask whether the same rule will be applied by this government in connection with goods imported into Canada from other parts of the British Empire? That is to say, will our government recognize these goods as being entitled to the preference if they have originated in some other part of the empire even though they have been actually shipped from a foreign port?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT SHIPMENTS
Sub-subtopic:   INTERPRETATION OF PROVISIONS OF BRITISH IMPORT DUTIES ACT, 1932
Permalink

October 26, 1932