October 25, 1932

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

In view of the language of the hon.

gentleman I think that this matter can stand as a notice of a question. This relates to the Department of National Revenue and the order was issued in accordance with the revision of an item in the tariff passed by this parliament. The hon. member might take the trouble to look up this matter, but tomorrow I shall make a formal answer to this question.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DUTY ON CELLULOSE
Permalink

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask

the Minister of Labour (Mr. Gordon) if he can inform the house when he expects to announce the government's policy in dealing with unemployment relief for the coming winter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Permalink
CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Labour; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. W. A. GORDON (Minister of Labour) :

Mr. Speaker, the government, in conjunction with the provinces and the municipalities has been proceeding since the beginning of the summer with the consideration of measures for unemployment relief. We are continuing the consideration of this matter and I believe that adequate provision will be made during the coming winter for the relief of those unable to take care of themselves. I am confident that no one in this country need worry about being adequately supplied with food, fuel, clothing and shelter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Permalink

PURCHASES OF WHEAT FUTURES


On the orders of the day: Mr. THOMAS F. DONNELLY (Willow Bunch): Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Stevens), arising out of an article which appeared in the Manitoba Free Press of October 23. This article states that there is no doubt in the minds of the wheat trade that the Dominion government through its pur- chases of wheat futures has been a stabilizing force behind the wheat market. Will the minister advise the house if that contention is correct?


CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Before answering that question I should like to see the article upon which it is based.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PURCHASES OF WHEAT FUTURES
Permalink
CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY:

I shall send the article across to the minister.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PURCHASES OF WHEAT FUTURES
Permalink

WHEAT BONUS


On the orders of the day:


LIB-PRO

Arthur-Lucien Beaubien

Liberal Progressive

Mr. A. L. BEAUBIEN (Provencher):

Mr. Speaker, in view of the recent slump in the wheat market I should like to ask the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett), if he is in position to make a statement with regard to the payment of a bonus on wheat.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT BONUS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

The present financial condition of the country will not permit the payment of a wheat bonus for the year 1932.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT BONUS
Permalink

RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker, I shall take this opportunity to reply to a question asked yesterday by the hon. member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Mackenzie), in connection with the importation of oil from Russia.

The house will remember that in 1927 there was a termination of relations between Russia and the Dominion government. A short discussion took place in the house with respect to this matter, as reported in Hansard of May 28, 1928, and reference was made thereto on other dates in that year. The custom of the department has been not to make known the names of consignors and consignees of merchandise and at that time there was no prohibition against the importation into this country of oil from Russia. The prohibition applied to coal, wood pulp, pulpwood, lumber and timber of all kinds, asbestos and furs. The prohibition on furs was defined subsequently as applying only to furs partly in a fabricated state. So far as the present importations of oil are concerned, some complaints have been received by the government and investigations have been made and are still being made to determine whether or not the oil in the form and quality in which it was imported constituted a possible violation of the provisions contained in the

Soldier Settlement

agreement to the extent of frustrating the preferences upon oil from the British dominion of Trinidad.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader -cf the Opposition):

To what date

did my right hon. friend refer at the beginning of his remarks?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I referred to the debate

on May 28, 1928, in which the right hon. gentleman referring to certain observations made by the hon. member for Labelle (Mr. Bourassa), dealt with the action of the Dominion government in severing relations with Russia. He referred then to the fact that the necessity for this action had arisen as a consequence of certain action taken by the British government to terminate the relationship then existing between Great Britain and the Soviet republics. As the right hon. gentleman pointed out, the action taken here was taken at about the same time. As he pointed out then, and as I assume has been known to every hon. member of the house, such action did not stop trading between Russia and Canada or Canada and Russia. The prohibition contained in the order in council of February, 1931, referred to the importation into this country of the articles and commodities which I have named. There seems to have been an idea abroad that the action taken by this country which terminated diplomatic relations between Canada and Russia, terminated all trade between the two countries. The right hon. gentleman pointed out in 1928 that such was not the case, and there have been no changes from that date to this except those incident to the passing of the order in council prohibiting the importation into this country of the commodities I have named. As I have said already, a subsequent order in council defined furs as being furs in a partly fabricated condition.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I thank the

Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) for giving this explanation because it should be clearly understood that the 1928 negotiations, or whatever they may be termed, related only to certain diplomatic privileges which had previously been granted exclusively to Russia and which were withdrawn at the time mentioned.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Hon. IAN MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Has it been determined yet by

the government that this oil is to pay a duty?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN OIL SHIPMENTS
Permalink

October 25, 1932