October 7, 1932

VACANCY

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that during the recess I received communications from two members, notifying me that the following vacancy had occurred in the representation, viz:

Of Thomas McMillan, member for the electoral district of South Huron, by decease.

I accordingly issued my warrant to the chief electoral officer to make out new writs of election ,for the said electoral district.

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NEW MEMBERS

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform' the house that the clerk of . the house has received from, the . chief electoral officer certificates of the election and return of the following members, viz:

Of Hon. George Burpee Jones, for the electoral district of Royal.

Of Joseph Jean, Esquire, for the electoral district of Maisonneuve.

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NEW MEMBERS INTRODUCED


Hon. George Burpee Jones, member for the electoral district of Royal, introduced by Right Hon. R. B. Bennett and Hon. Murray MacLaren. Joseph Jean, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Maisonneuve, introduced by Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King and Hon. Fernand Rinfret.


OATHS OF OFFICE


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 1 respecting the administration of oaths of office. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes I have obtained a copy which is as follows:

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

I welcome you to your duties at this season for my ministers deem it expedient that you should consider, without delay, the agreements made at the Imperial Economic Conference recently held in this city of Ottawa, between Canada and the other countries of the empire. My government are of opinion that these agreements provide the means by which will be developed an enduring and mutually beneficial scheme of closer empire economic association, and that their early approval is advisable in the national interest.

The- report of the Royal Commission on Railway's and Transportation will be laid before ;parliament. In .view of the conclusions and recommendations contained in that report your attention will be invited, at the earliest possible date, to a bill designed to ensure more effective and economical operation of Canadian

Governor General's Speech

railways upon the basis of fair competition, secured in such manner as will avoid extravagant and harmful duplication of services.

Since the last session of parliament, my ministers have entered into a treaty wdth the government of the United States of America for the completion of the St. Lawrence Waterway. Upon its ratification by the duly constituted authority of the United States, this treaty will be submitted to you for approval.

A committee has been appointed by order in council to inquire into the operation of the Pensions Act so that my ministers may have before them all information necessary to determine whether further action may be required to discharge the country's obligation to those who served in the great war.

The problem of unemployment continues to receive the anxious attention of my ministers. Under the powers granted them at the last session of parliament, they have been able to develop further, in cooperation with the provinces and municipalities, a scheme of direct relief to be put into operation during the autumn and winter months to the extent required by prevailing conditions. Plans for the reestablishment of the unemployed in various parts of the country are in preparation and will become operative as soon as, in the opinion of my ministers, the public expenditure incident thereto will be productive of commensurate benefits.

It is a matter of gratification to us all that in those large areas of the west, where, during recent successive years, crop failure was followed by widespread distress, this season's bountiful harvest forecasts greatly improved conditions and makes possible a corresponding reduction of relief measures.

In accordance with the provisions of the British North America Act, you will be invited to consider a bill for the redistribution of representation of the provinces in the House of Commons.

There will also be brought before you for consideration other measures which my ministers deem to be in the public interest.

You will be invited to extend Canadian bank charters for one year in order that parliament may be informed of the results of the proposed world economic and financial conference, to be called to consider financial, economic and monetary problems, before undertaking the decennial revision of the Bank Act.

When you have considered the matters requiring your immediate attention, it is proposed that parliament shall adjourn, until early in the new year, then to proceed with the ordinary business of the session.

Members of the House of Commons:

The public accounts for the last fiscal year and the estimates for the coming year will be submitted after parliament has reassembled. These estimates will reflect the continuance of the policy of my ministers to exercise every economy, compatible with the proper administration of the state, until more favourable economic conditions shall have materially augmented the current national revenues. Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

While the economic situation still weighs heavily upon all Classes of the community, there are at last definite signs that the acuteness of the depression is passing. I rejoice that the

wisdom of your steadfast policy of retrenchment and constructive development, which has ameliorated the hardships of Canadians and maintained the enviable financial position of this country, is still more fully manifest with approaching prosperity. The strength of our financial structure, the resourcefulness of agriculture, and the integrity of industry have enabled us to take quick and profitable advantage of improved conditions. The ratification of empire trade agreements and your approval of the proposed economies and reforms in railway transportation are means by which Canada's favoured position will be more fully secured among the nations of the world.

The unity, fortitude and capacity of the Canadian people, w'itliout which all your labours would have been in vain, shall be now the foundation upon which, with cooperation and faith, we will build a Canada greater than we have yet known. I pray that Divine Providence may guide you in your exalted task.

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime

Minister) moved:

That the speech of His Excellency the Governor General to both houses of parliament be taken into consideration on Monday next.

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Motion agreed to.


SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved: That a special committee be appointed to prepare and report with all convenient speed, lists of members to compose the select standing committees of this house under standing order 63. said committee to be composed of Messrs. Rhodes, Dupre, Simpson (Algoma West), Stewart (Edmonton West), and Casgrain. Motion agreed to.


INTERNAL ECONOMY COMMISSION


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) presented the following message from His Excellency the Governor General: The Governor General transmits to the House of Commons a certified copy of an approved minute of council, appointing the Honourable E. N. Rhodes, Minister of Finance; the Honourable D. M. Sutherland, Minister of National Defence; the Honourable T. G. Murphy, Minister of the Interior and Superintendent General of Indian Affairs; the Honourable Maurice Dupre. Solicitor General, to act with the Speaker of the House of Commons as commissioners for the purposes and under the provisions of chapter 145 of the revised statutes of Canada, 1927, intituled, "An Act respecting the House of Commons." .


DEPUTY SERGEANT-AT-ARMS

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that the Sergeant-at-Arms, with imy approval, has appointed Lieutenant J. L. Williams to be his deputy during the present session of parliament.

On motion of Mr. Bennett the house adjourned at 4.10 p.m.

The late Mr. Thomas McMillan

Friday, October 7, 1932

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THE LATE MR. THOMAS McMILLAN

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, there being no orders of the day, I rise for the purpose of expressing on my own behalf as well as on behalf of all those who sit to the right of the Speaker our deep sympathy with the right hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King) and those associated with him in the passing of the late member for South Huron (Mr. Thomas McMillan).

Thomas McMillan was one of that band of Scotch Canadians who have contributed so mightily to the upbuilding of this Dominion. Although he was born in Canada his love of Scotland manifested itself in his familiarity with and love for the writings of the immortal Burns, and those of us who have listened to his speeches in this house recognize how strong was his love of Scotland and how he manifested it in almost every speech that he made by references either to Burns or to some other of the great national poets.

He was a farmer by calling, and early in life manifested an interest in the local government of his county. Blessed with a facility of speech, he was a popular lecturer, if that term might be applied to agricultural subjects, and in due course came to this House of Commons, where his strong convictions, his earnestness and his ability to express himself made for him a very unique position. He had strong opinions, which he expressed with great clearness and with great vigour. But I should like myself to bear witness to the warmth of his sympathy and the kindness of his heart, for on more than one occasion after great and seemingly acute differences of opinion he has expressed to me his appreciation of the work in which I was engaged and was good enough more than once to indicate his approval of the way in which I was doing it-not that he shared my beliefs or my political faith-but he did it out of the kindness of his heart and a warmhearted desire to express his goodwill towards a fellow-Canadian and fellow-member of this house. I cannot do more than say that the community in which he lived has lost a great and useful citizen. This house is the poorer for his passing. Perhaps I could not do better than say of this Christian citizen, what I said on a previous occasion with respect to one other:

53719-1}

Life's race well run,

Life's work well done,

Life's crown well won;

Now comes rest.

That at least may be applied in all sincerity to the life and work of Thomas McMillan.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I

thank the right hon. the Prime Minister for the sympathy which he has expressed with other Liberal members and myself in the loss of our colleague, and for the tribute which he has paid to the memory of the late Thomas McMillan, who was a greatly respected member of this House of Commons, and one deeply beloved by those who knew him best. By all in this chamber Mr. McMillan's presence will be greatly missed. Those who sit on this side will experience a sense of deep personal and party loss, but no one more so than myself. No leader ever had a more loyal supporter or more sincere counsellor, or a more devoted personal friend.

In many particulars, Mr. McMillan's death means much in the way of loss to this parliament and to Canada. Both in parliament and in the country his life u'as a link wdth the past. At the time of his death, Mr. McMillan was living on the farm which his father, some ninety years before, had literally hewed out of the forests and cleared and fenced with his own hands. He was, at the time of his death, the representative of South Huron, the constituency which also his father before him had for many years represented in this House of Commons. If, in our country, there is one class above another to whom honour is due, and whose memory we should hold in reverence, it is the pioneers, in settlement and in government, of early days. In his life's activities and associations, Mr. McMillan's presence was a constant reminder of this debt which the Present owes to the Past. He carried on and exemplified many splendid traditions of the early pioneers.

At the time of his death in Huron county on the 7th of June last, Mr. McMillan was approaching the allotted three score years and ten, being in his sixty-ninth year. Having started life on his father's farm, he soon began to share his father's interest in various pursuits. Long before he entered parliament, he became deeply concerned in the problems of agriculture, and as a practical farmer, and one who was gifted in speaking on agricultural subjects, did what he could to further the interests of agriculture in our Dominion. His sympathies, however, were not restricted

The late Mr. Thomas McMillan

to the interests of any one class. He was essentially a man of the people, whose highest concern was with their well-being. It was this interest, which he inherited and which was fostered by parental example, which caused him to devote much of his time to municipal affairs, and to serve his township as councillor and reeve before being honoured by nomination as a candidate for parliament. He was unsuccessful in his first two political contests, those of 1917 and 1921. In the three succeeding general elections, those of 1925, 1926, and 1930, he was returned as the member of the county in which he was bom and had continued to live.

To his parliamentary duties Mr. McMillan brought personal qualities and attainments of a high order. He was a man of great integrity, rare independence, and deep convictions, and these qualities were easily discernible in all that he did and said. He was ardent in the advocacy of every measure which he believed to be for the good of his fellow'-men. His political opponents might not agree with his views, or like his militant attitude, but no one, as the Prime Minister has just said, would ever have questioned the sincerity of his motives, nor his moral earnestness. In his personal and public relations he was the soul of honour, and fidelity was a watchword with him in the discharge of his public duties.

For the right, as Mr. McMillan saw it, no sacrifice was too great, if the occasion demanded. In other lands, and at other times, his name would have found its place on the roll of honour of those sturdy yeomen who are the bulwark of their country's freedom. It might, as readily, in any Christian cause, have found its place upon some roll of martyrdom. In the happier age and land in which he lived, he was an example, to his day and generation, of those qualities of manhood which are bred of loyalty to the homely virtues; and which find their expression in the highest loyalties to friend and cause, and to church and state. These are qualities *which make greatly for the vigour, the strength and the enrichment of our public life, and Canada to-day is the better for Mr. McMillan's life, his work, and his example.

Mr. McMillan's death removed the last member, save one, of the family of five

a father, mother, two sons and one daughter- who, but six years ago, were members of one household on the McMillan farm. To Miss Margaret McMillan, the sole survivor, still young in years, and thus so greatly bereaved, this house will extend the fullest measure of its sympathy.

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October 7, 1932