May 9, 1932

PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST AND SECOND READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 75, for the relief of Ida Tarantour Waxman.-Mr. Heaps. Bill No. 76, for the relief of Frances Helen Dawes Porteous.-Mr. Bell (St. Antoine). Bill No. 77, for the relief of Minnie Jones Chandler.-Mr. Lawson. Bill No. 78, for the relief of Elizabeth Irene Woolnough.-Mr. Bell (St. Antoine). Bill No. 79, for the relief of Ellery Sanford Johnston.-Mr. Garland (Carleton). Bill No. 80, for the relief of Faria Goldman Rother.-Mr. Jacobs.


RADIO BROADCASTING

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY PROBLEM OF INSTITUTING CANADIAN SYSTEM

CON

Raymond Ducharme Morand

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. RAYMOND MORAND (East Essex):

Mr. Speaker, I .beg leave to present the second and final report of the special committee on radio broadcasting also a copy of the proceedings and evidence. Further, I wish to give notice that on Wednesday I shall move for concurrence. The report is as follows:

Monday, May 9, 1932.

The special committee on radio broadcasting has the honour to present the following as its second and final report:

In accordance with the duties and responsibilities delegated to us, and the terms of reference submitted, your committee met on March 8, and, since that time, held twenty-seven meetings, heard evidence, received briefs and submissions from fifty-three sources, including governments, individuals, corporations, associations, leagues and clubs.

Your committee was seized, from the inception, of the national importance and international character of radio broadcasting, and the evidence submitted has ser%Ted to further consolidate our opinion of the far-reaching scope and benefits of proper, well-regulated broadcasting services throughout Canada, as a medium of education, thought-provoking development, and fostering of Canadian ideals and culture, entertainment, news service and publicity of this country and its products, and as an auxiliary to religious and educational teaching, also as one of the most efficient mediums for developing a greater national and empire consciousness within the dominion and the British Commonwealth of nations.

Your committee desires to express at the outset, to the present radio broadcasting stations, this tribute: That they entered as pioneers in a field of service in the art of radio, and, under trying handicaps and sacrifices, worthily kept pace with a science fraught with ever-changing improvements and development, and rendered this service under handicaps, which is most praiseworthy.

Radio-Report of Committee

Your committee is convinced, however, that the present system, excellent as it is in certain respects, does not meet the requirements in quality and scope of broadcasting to ensure its maximum benefits.

Reference No. 1

"To consider the report of the Royal Commission on Radio Broadcasting, dated the 11th day of September, 1929, commonly known as 'The Aird report/ "

Your committee was fortunate in having the three members of the Aird commission appear before us to amplify and explain their report, and much valuable information was thereby secured, and, if we are unable to completely accept their findings, it must be obvious that there has been a great change in the science of radio broadcasting, and in the financial condition of the country, in the last three years.

Reference No. 2

"To advise and recommend a complete technical scheme for radio broadcasting for Canada, so designed as to ensure from Canadian sources as complete and satisfactory a service as the present development of radio science will permit."

Your committee recommends a chain of high-power national stations, operating on clear channels, located at suitable intervals, the location to be determined by a careful technical survey of Canada.

Your committee recommends that consideration be given to the use of five 50 K.W. stations, one in each of the following provinces of Canada, viz., British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and, in the maritimes, three 500 watt stations, one for each province, or one 50 K.W. station, as may be determined by the commission. In Saskatchewan and Alberta, we suggest two 5 KW. stations in each province, synchronized on a common channel. Further, a 10 K.W. station in northern Ontario and one in western Ontario, a 1 K.W. station at Port Arthur-Fort William, a 500 watt station in Toronto, and a 1 K.W. station at, or near, Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec.

Your committee further recommends a number of stations, of 100 watt power and under, operating on shared channels, located where required,-

(a) To serve areas not satisfactorily covered by the national stations.

(b) For secondary stations in areas where there is a demand for several channels to be in operation at the same time.

(c) For educational purposes.

fd) For legitimate experimental work.

(e) For local broadcasting of community interest.

Your committee further recommends that the cost of radio in Canada be self-sustaining and that only the money available from transmitters' and receivers' licence fees, and advertising income, be expended, and that the question of the amount of receivers' licence fees be left entirely in the hands of the governor in council.

Reference No. 3

"To investigate and report upon the most satisfactory agency for carrying out such a scheme."

Your committee recommends that a commission be appointed, consisting of three adequately-paid coriimissioners; a chairman to hold office for a period of ten years; a vicechairman for a period of nine years, and the third commissioner, for a period of eight years.

That there be appointed an assistant commissioner in each province, who shall also act as chairman of such provincial or regional advisory program committees as may be formed; the assistant commissioners to be selected in consultation with the governments of their respective provinces.

Your committee further recommends that the commission be vested with the necessary powers to carry on the business of broadcasting in the Dominion of Canada, such powers to extend to the following matters,-

(a) To regulate and control all broadcasting in Canada, including programs and advertising.

(b) To own, build and operate transmitting or receiving stations in Canada.

(c) To acquire by lease, purchase, expropriation or otherwise, any or all existing broadcasting stations.

(d) To enter into operating agreements with privately-owned stations.

(e) To originate programs, and secure outside programs by purchase or exchange, and to make the arrangements necessary for their transmission.

(f) To determine the number, location and power of all broadcasting stations required in Canada.

(g) To control the issuing or cancellation of licences to broadcasting stations.

(h) To cancel the allotments of channels to any stations, or to make substitution of channels.

(i) To prohibit the establishment of privately-operated chains of stations in Canada.

(j) Subject to the approval of the parliament of Canada, to take over all broadcasting in Canada.

(k) To be vested with all other powers necessary or incidental for the fulfilment of the objects of the commission.

Your committee recommends,-

(a) That one of the first duties of the commission be the establishment of trans-Canada chain broadcasting through the securing of the necessary landmines as soon as possible.

(b) That a nationally-owned system of radio broadcasting be instituted, and that all stations required for its proper organization be eventually acquired, same to be financed from the revenues accruing to the business of broadcasting, without expense to the taxpayers through the public treasury.

(c) That all stations, 100 watt and under, not required for the national system, remain under private ownership, but be regulated as to programs and advertising, by the rules of the commission.

(d) That all revenues obtained from licence fees, sale of advertisement, and other revenues accessory to the business of broadcasting, be used by the commission in the interest of radio.

(e) That advertising be limited to not more than 5 per cent of each program period.

(f) That the developing of Canadian art and artists, and the securing of outstanding programs from outside Canada, be encouraged.

Radio-Report of Committee

(g) That the commission make available to the provinces, when possible, the facilities of national and chain broadcasting.

(h) That the commission make special effort to give such programs as will be acceptable to provincial and local requirements.

(i) That before making changes in Canadian radio broadcasting, the commission makes a complete survey of the present system, with particular reference to adequate coverage.

We desire to call attention to the extreme importance that the commission should not assume, or even be suspected of assuming, a political complexion. Your committee append hereto a copy of the proceedings, and evidence adduced before your committee, for the information of the house.

All which is respectfully submitted.

(Sgd.) Raymond D. Morand, Chairman, W. A. Beynon,

Onesime Gagnon,

R. K. Smith,

I). McK. Wright,

P. J. Cardin,

W. D. Euler,

J. L. Ilsley,

E. J. Garland.

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY PROBLEM OF INSTITUTING CANADIAN SYSTEM
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

The report tabled contains a

recommendation for a technical scheme of broadcasting-pursuant to the terms of reference-which involved the employment of an increased number of channels of prescribed power, located within certain areas.

One of the outstanding difficulties in the establishment of a national system of broadcasting is that of coordinating the channels to be used with those used by neighbouring countries. Because of Canada's proximity to the United States, where a highly developed system of broadcasting prevails, this question of coordination and adjustment becomes one of peculiar importance. Having regard to this situation, and with a view to determining whether this recommendation of the committee could, in fact, be implemented without involving interference which would make it ineffective in practice, the chairman asked me, as Minister of External Affairs, to ascertain from the United States government if it was prepared to make such adjustments of channels in the broadcast band as would ensure the effective operation of the scheme. Thereupon, I requested the Canadian minister to initiate negotiations to that end. The notes which I shall read disclose the agreements which have followed upon these negotiations. I have only to add that the note of the United States government manifests a friendly desire to facilitate the effective development of the national project recommended by the committee.

The note from the Canadian minister to Mr. W. R. Castle, the Acting Secretary of State, Washington, dated Canadian Legation, Washington, May 5, 1932, reads:

Sir,

I have the honour to inform you that the Canadian House of Commons recently appointed a committee to enquire into the whole position of radio broadcasting in Canada. This committee has under consideration a technical scheme for broadcasting in Canada which it is considered will provide satisfactory coverage in the chief population areas throughout the dominion and at the same time make provision for the community service that may be desired. This scheme is divided into two distinct parts:

(a) A chain of high-power stations, operating on clear channels, and located at suitable intervals across Canada:

(b) A number of low-power stations of very limited range, operating on shared channels, and located as required for community service.

If this scheme receives the approval of parliament, it is proposed to use 50 K.W. stations, one in each of the provinces of British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and eventually one in the maritime provinces. In Saskatchewan and Alberta it is proposed to use 5 K.W. stations at present, two being used in each province, synchronized on a common channel. In Ontario there will be, in addition, two 10 K.W. stations, one in western Ontario-and one in northern Ontario. Four smaller stations of one K.W. capacity each are provided for the Port Arthur-Fort William area, and for Ottawa, Montreal, and Quebec. In the maritimes, three 500-watt stations are provided for the present, one in each province. The scheme also includes a 500-watt station on the shared channels for the city of Toronto for local service.

In adopting this plan, Canada would reserve the right to increase the power of the stations in Alberta, Saskatchewan, northern and western Ontario to 50 K.W. each, should such increase become necessary.

The committee, in addition to considering the power required, propose the following channels

as suitable for the main stations:

Prince Edward Island 630

New Brunswick 1,030

Nova Scotia 1,050

Quebec 930

Montreal area ( 1 K.W. ) .. .. 600

Montreal area (50 K.W.) . . .. 730

Ottawa 880

Toronto area (500 watt) 1,120

Toronto area (50 K.W.) 690

Western Ontario 840

Northern Ontario 960

Port Arthur-Fort William area. 780

Manitoba 910

Saskatchewan 540

Alberta 1,030

British Columbia 1,100

In order to ensure satisfactory local broadcast service throughout Canada, it is proposed that stations, limited to a maximum power of 100 watts, be erected where necessary, and that they should be operated on shared channels. It is considered that one hundred or more such stations may eventually be required in Canada, and that twenty channels should be available for this type of service. In establishing such stations, it is proposed to maintain the same geographical separation between Canadian and United States stations as is maintained between United States stations of the same power.

Questions

Due notification would, of course, be given of the effective dates of any changes in the present operation to conform with the above plan.

In the event of the adoption of the above arrangement, it is understood that if, as the result of the Madrid conference, any additional channels are made available for broadcasting, a further allocation will be made, as between the United States and Canada, on an equitable basis.

I shall be obliged if you will inform me at your early convenience whether the United States authorities can make the necessary readjustments so that these channels will be available for effective use in Canada.

I have the honour to be, with the highest consideration,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble servant,

(Sgd.) W. D. Herridge.

To which Mr. Castle, Acting Secretary of State, replied under date of May 5, 1932:

Sir,-

I am grateful for your courtesy in informing me by your note of May 5, 1932, of the technical plan which is being considered by the committee of the Canadian House of Commons as a means of providing Canada witfi satisfactory radio broadcasting coverage. You inquire whether the authorities of the United States can make the readjustment necessary to render certain channels available for effective use in Canada.

In reply, I am glad to inform you that as notice is given from time to time of the dates of changes to be made in the present operations of Canadian broadcasting stations t( conform to the plan set out, this government will be glad to make the necessary readjustments.

It is understood that, if as the result of the Madrid conference, any additional channels are made available for broadcasting, a further allocation will be made, as between the United States and Canada, on an equitable basis.

Accept, sir, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration.

W. R. Castle,

Acting Secretary of State.

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY PROBLEM OF INSTITUTING CANADIAN SYSTEM
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


POLITICAL PARTISANSHIP INVESTIGATION

LIB

Mr. POULIOT:

Liberal

1. Was Mr. Alphonse Garon, commissioner, in connection with charges of political partisanship, sworn before performing his duties?

2. If so, where, on what date and by whom?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTISANSHIP INVESTIGATION
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CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAHAN:

1 and 2. No, but subsequently on 21st October, 1931, at Rimouski, before Notary Marc Andre Filion.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTISANSHIP INVESTIGATION
Permalink

DALHOUSIE, N.B.-MIGUASHA AND CARLETON, QIIE., FERRY

LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

What were the traffic returns of the subsidized ferry between Dalhousie, New Brunswick, and Miguasha and Carleton, Quebec, for the years 1929, 1930 and 1931 respectively?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DALHOUSIE, N.B.-MIGUASHA AND CARLETON, QIIE., FERRY
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CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

1929 1930 1931Round trips 613 633 654Passengers carried.. 6,756 6,388 2,531Tons of freight.. .. 32 32 33Automobiles 1,026 1,226 480Live stock, including teams not stated 166Average per single trip- Passengers

5 5 2Freight 52 lbs. 50 lbs. 50 lbs.Autos S 1 iLive stock - - i

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DALHOUSIE, N.B.-MIGUASHA AND CARLETON, QIIE., FERRY
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UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF-QUEBEC PROVINCE

CON

Samuel Gobeil

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GOBEIL:

How many requests made to the dominion Labour department by the provincial authorities of the province of Quebec, for works in the various municipalities of said province in 1931-32, pursuant to the Unemployment Relief Act, were refused by said department.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF-QUEBEC PROVINCE
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CON

George Gordon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

All requests made by the provincial government for municipal works were approved by the Department of Labour and duly authorized by the governor in council.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF-QUEBEC PROVINCE
Permalink

MR. ISAIE SAVARD

CON

Mr. LAFLECHE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is Isaie Savard, of Montreal, in the employ of the government ?

2. If so, what is his occupation, his salary and by whom was he recommended?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MR. ISAIE SAVARD
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May 9, 1932