April 20, 1932

CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

Surely these imports of raw materials are an indication that in a very short time there will be an increase in labour.

Mr. ST-PERE: They are buying in a cheap market.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

This tendency to increase the imports of raw materials will mean in the very near future more labour for the people of this country.

Mr. ST-PERE: I hope so.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

It does not appear that you do. As to the shoe industry, which is almost entirely in Quebec, it is to-day normal, and I think I can safely say that the industry is showing signs of renewed prosperity. Our importations in that line have become almost insignificant, for they do not represent to-day more than five per cent of our consumption. The same condition prevails in the tobacco industry. Not only has our consumption of the domestic product increased, but Canadian tobacco has become an important export. When last fall I had an opportunity of visiting the harbour of Liverpool, it was my privilege to go through the tobacco warehouses in that great centre of distribution for the empire and particularly for the mother country; and while going through these warehouses I was proud to see among the bundles of tobaccos from various countries, so many bundles of good Canadian tobacco. On inquiry I was told by those in charge that this Canadian tobacco was highly praised and that its use in England was widespread. They told

me that in the near future if we could send more tobacco they would be in a position to distribute and sell it in England. It is also gratifying to know that eighty per cent of the tobacco consumed in Canada has been grown on Canadian soil.

Now I come to another industry which is very important, the dairy industry of Canada. We must not forget that under the regime of our friends opposite Canada imported considerable quantities of butter. Imagine a farming country like this importing, under the administration of hon. gentlemen opposite, and particularly in the year 1930, because of their indifference to the interests of dairying in Canada, butter amounting in value to $41,919,372. Imagine $41,000,000 of Canadian money being sent to other countries to purchase butter for a farming country!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Will my hon. friend permit a question? Is he in favour of higher prices for butter-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Unless the hon. member who is speaking indicates, by taking his seat, his willingness to permit an interruption, the hon. member has no right to interpose a question.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

I am just asking my hon. friend if he agrees-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member has not signified his willingness to permit a question to be asked. That is done by the hon. member taking his seat, and he has not done so.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

I am against the importation of butter into Canada. I am proud to be able to say that under the present regime Canada is again an exporting country as far as butter is concerned.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Is my hon. friend unwilling to allow me to ask a question?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

Oh, no.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Is the hon. member in

favour of higher prices for butter with importations, or lower prices with no importations?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

I am against the

importation of butter into this country, and I am in favour of higher prices for butter. Once the present crisis has passed, better prices will be received for our butter. There is indication that the present "consumption of butter in Canada is one hundred per cent of the Canadian product.

I do not desire to spend too much time dealing with these questions, but I must direct the attention of the house to the fact that

The Budget-Mr. Duranleau

progress has been made in the general activity of this country. Since this government came into power nearly 150 new industries have been established in the course of a few months, and I am sure that when the present economic crisis has passed, the protecting policies of this government will bring further prosperity to Canada. There are many great enterprises, born of necessity, which must be taken care of. We must consider the reorganization of our national ports, the improvement and completion of our waterways and highways, the continuance of scientific research, the safeguarding of our present markets and the opening up of new ones. These questions cannot be settled over night, as has been suggested by hon. friends opposite who seem to be still under the influence of the dream which they must have had during their long sleep of twelve years while they were in power.

There is one question with which I desire to deal, the St. Lawrence deep waterway. The present indications are that this great undertaking is in danger of being made a political football by hon. friends opposite. Strange voices and strange arguments are heard, particularly in my own province, but I want to say to those hon. members who fear that certain rights may be jeopardized that this government will never relax its vigilance over the safeguarding of Canadian interests and rights, no matter where those interests may be found, in Quebec or Ontario, at Montreal or the head of the lakes. The maintenance of the St. Lawrence river as a national route, the protection of levels during the low-water season, the safeguarding of navigation-which includes the dredging of a thirty-five foot channel between Montreal and the sea-are questions which will be always given consideration by this government. But party struggles and party strife at times will make impossible the discussion of the most important questions strictly on their merits, questions which affect the peace and life of the nation. How can this evil be cured? I believe the best remedy is to bring these matters into the da3dight where they can be properly discussed.

Some time ago the hon. member for Dorchester (Mr. Gagnon) treated with great justice the actions of a former minister of the crown, but I intend to direct the attention of this house to the kind of tactics employed at Three Rivers during the elections of 1931. During last session I referred to the utter failure of these doubtful tactics, especially to the use of the war scare during 1930. Referring to the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett), La Chronique, a virulent Grit organ,

said that "this potentate" was "the enemy of our language and of our religion." Imagine the Prime Minister of this country being the enemy of French Canadians and of their religion! Another statement by this paper was:

Remember conscription. French Canadians avenge yourselves next Monday. Victory 'is at our door.

Luckily the victory went to another door, the door of the great Conservative party and its great leader. I have read the speeches made by some of our Liberal friends during that campaign, and I find that the hon. member for Hochelaga (Mr. St-Pere) said:

Bennett says that only those workers who are willing to work shall have employment. What does that mean? It will be like the. dole in England. They will send your sons, our French Canadians, to work on the roads of new Ontario at mean wages.

Mr. ST-PERE : Who is going to bulldoze

me by making me sit down?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Mr. ST-PERE: I am rising to a point

of order.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

What is the point of

order?

Mr. ST-PERE: I deny completely-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

That is not a point of

order.

Mr. ST-PERE: A question of privilege ;

call it what you like, Mr. Speaker. During every election campaign in which I have taken part-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

There is no question of

privilege when the hon. member refers to what his conduct has been in previous elections.

Mr. ST-PERE: I deny completely-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order.

Mr. ST-PERE: Words are being put in

my mouth-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

There is a way of dealing with hon. members who do not obey the rule, and I should regret to have to take that course.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

I do not desire to go any further-

Mr. ST-PERE: That is the kind of argument to use.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink

April 20, 1932