April 19, 1932

LIB
CON

Richard Burpee Hanson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

The honour of the country.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   FIRST AND SECOND READINGS
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LIB-PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Liberal Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

Don't you talk to us about honour.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILL
Subtopic:   FIRST AND SECOND READINGS
Permalink

THE BUDGET

CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE


The house resumed from Monday, April 18, consideration of the motion of Hon. E. N. Rhodes (Minister of Finance) that Mr. Speaker do now leave the chair for the house to go into committee of ways and means, the proposed amendment thereto of Mr. Ralston, and the proposed amendment to the amendment of Mr. Gardiner. The Budget-Mr. Reid


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

Mr. Speaker, before saying what I have to say on the amendments to the 'budget, I want to make a few remarks regarding statements that were made in the house on Thursday last in connection with unemployment relief works in British Columbia last fall. I did not intend again introducing this subject as, first, I thought enough had been said in the house to show the great need there was for having an unpartisan committee handle relief matters, and also, second, that the mere fact of discussing the matter does not help the present situation in British Columbia. I would not again introduce this were it not for the fact that the hon. member for Nanaimo (Mr. Dickie) saw fit to bring up the matter in this house, when he read a report which purported to emanate from Victoria- a report in connection with a committee that had been appointed iby that legislature to inquire into affairs affecting the unemployment situation in British Columbia, and in which reiport my name is three times mentioned.

I think it is only fair that I should make some reply. I do not propose to allow those statements to go unchallenged. Before proceeding, however, let me say that I am indeed sorry that so estimable a gentleman as the hon. member for Nanaimo, one who is universally liked on both sides of the house, should have seen fit to introduce in this house what at that time must have been either an advance copy of the draft report or a telegraphic copy wired to him the night before, and which I claim was introduced in this house in an endeavour to discredit statements which I and others had made, and with a view to bolstering up his friends in Victoria. It is true, as the hon. member for Nanaimo stated, that a committee had been appointed to investigate the charges that had been made with reference to the handling of unemployment relief in British Columbia. That committee was composed of members from both sides, Liberals and Conservatives, the Conservatives, being, according to custom, in the majority. I may say that both the draft report and the final report as presented to the house in Victoria were prepared by the Conservative members of the committee, and that report was presented to the Legislature of British Columbia only on Wednesday, the day previous to its introduction in this house. The draft was prepared on the 11th. In support of that statement I will quote from the Vancouver Sun of April 11, which was the Monday:

After Major Brown was dismissed from the committee, the members went into camera to consider the draft report which had been prepared by the chairman. The Liberal members withdrew along with Mr. Pattullo. T. D. Pattullo announced that he had taken the stand that the terms of the resolution calling for a full investigation had not been carried out in any degree. The evidence was not before the committee and he did not consider he could be of any assistance in drafting a report under those circumstances. The other Liberal members withdrew along with Mr. Pattullo.

As a matter of fact, the full inquiry closed only on Monday of last week, which was the 11th, and which was just three days previous to its introduction in this house. Now I intend to deal a little later with the contents of that report, but for the moment I will discuss the investigation which was held. Perhaps it would be well for me to read an impartial opinion with reference to this investigation. I quote also from the Vancouver Daily Province of the 11th, the following:

Twigg probe "shameless spectacle."

Mr. Twigg was the chairman of that committee.

Harold Brown, trade board president, slams inquiry. Investigation into relief camp expenditure in British Columbia, carried on recently by a select committee of the provincial legislature was "a spectacle of shameless evasion and distortion of the truth," Mr. Harold Brown, president of the Vancouver board of trade, told members of the real estate exchange at a luncheon in Hotel Georgia at noon Friday. "I 'sat in' on some of the sessions of the so-called probe," Mr. Brown declared, "and can draw my own conclusions from what I saw and heard, "if anyone told the truth they would have been crucified.". . . "The gorgeous spectacle in Victoria of the so-called probe-at $200 a day-in which if anyone spoke the truth he would be crucified," exemplifies the policy "to drift," he contended.

Mr. Brown is a very prominent citizen of Vancouver. He holds the important position of president of the Vancouver board of trade and is a well known business man who is held in high regard. I believe that he was formerly Conservative, but at the moment he declares that he has no use for either party. He is therefore just now a non-partisan, and he was, I believe, speaking impartially. In support of that statement, I will show later on the attitude he took when he appeared before that committee.

Such statements, Mr. Speaker, could not be left unchallenged, coming as they did from so important a personage as Mr. Harold Brown, and so Mr. Twigg at once asked him to come to Victoria and explain to the committee the statements he had made, namely, that the whole investigation was a shameless spectacle, etc. He appeared before that committee, and I am going to read here one or two quotations with regard to what he had said, and the statements he made. He was asked

The Budget-Mr. Reid

whether he would take back or apologize for what he had said. He said, no; he would not take back one word; everything he had said had to stand. I quote:

"We are not satisfied that the details have been developed," he said. "We know funds were eaten up wholesale. My knowledge is based on details that have been given to me personally."

"Gossip?" suggested the chairman.

"No, I do not gossip," retorted Major Brown. "My information is from responsible business men."

He stated the inquiry had been a farce, inasmuch as a timekeeper who had been called from one of the camps to give evidence had been there from fifteen to twenty days and had not been summoned before the committee to give any information regarding the expenditures in connection with those camps. From accounts that have been received since, I may say, Mr. Brown is being generally complimented upon his courageous statements.

Now, regarding the statements made by myself, on March 16 last in this house, I intend to take a few minutes discussing these. On that date I made fourteen definite assertions with regard to the handling of the unemployment relief situation in British Columbia. Out of those fourteen assertions the committee have seen fit to embody only three in their report as submitted in the legislature in Victoria and as presented to this house on Thursday of last week. As I have stated they dealt only with three of the fourteen assertions. However, I will discuss those three because my name has been brought in, and statements have been made regarding what I had said. The first statement made was with reference to a statement which will be found in Hansard of March 16, and which was quoted here on Thursday of last week. Let me read from the report:

The suggestion made by Mr. Thos. Reid, member of the House of Commons for New Westminster (at page 1283 of Hansard. 1932), that one manufacturer had "sold 50.000 blankets and it took him out of the red," is without any foundation in fact.

Regarding that statement of mine, I have only this to say, Mr. Speaker, that the information was given me just before I left for Ottawa by a prominent business man in Vancouver, and one who is in the wholesale line in a large way. I accepted it from him in good faith. The second reference to myself in the report reads:

(g) Mr. Thomas Reid (at page 1283 of Hansard 1932), stated:

"I counted in one camp 450 steel wheelbarrows. They had so many that a man was to be appointed to regulate their use." The evidence before your committee indicated that there might be 450 steel wheelbarrows in one

camp but it would be in the nature of a depot or warehouse camp for a group of camps, and that the man referred to would be for the purpose of distributing wheelbarrows and other tools and supplies among the various camps requiring them.

They admit that the second allegation was correct, notice that they say there- might have been 450 steel wheelbarrows. I am glad they do admit that because I counted them. They then say it was a distributing camp, but, Mr. Speaker, this camp was miles and miles away off by itself and almost on the boundary line between the United States and Canada. It could not have been a distributing camp because it was not near any other camp and was off the lines of communication or traffic. In connection with the third charge the report of the committee reads:

Mr. Reid further stated: "I have no comment to make regarding the construction camps except to criticize the loose way in which they were run." The evidence before your committee indicated that the camps were conducted in an efficient and economical manner.

What other finding could the committee make when they would not hear the evidence available? They refused to hear the timekeeper who was available as well as other witnesses who could have given information regarding the camp. Mr. Brown, an impartial witness, testified, and it might be as well to quote from his testimony because if I were to make the statements it might be said they were partisan. The newspaper report of this inquiry reads as follows:

Mr. Loutet again asked for one specific instance. "You cannot get evidence in a political inquiry which is accurate," Mr. Brown continued. He asked why a Mr. Brian, who was in Victoria for some fifteen or twenty days, was not called. He was a timekeeper in a North Okanagan camp. "He could have given information on some vital points."

The chairman, Mr. Twigg, then said: "Name another case." To my mind that was practically admitting that this charge was correct. The report continues:

"Then you -are attributing to all the witnesses a careful plan of distorting the truth unless you will exonerate some of them," General Clark insisted. "You decline to exonerate any witnesses."

"You can draw your own conclusions," Mr. Brown replied.

And again: [DOT]

Mr; Brown then asked the right to put some questions of his own to Mr. Twigg.

"Do you consider the inquiry perfect as to details of wasteful expenditure?" He asked.

Mr. Twigg replied that the committee had gone as deeply into these matters as it could.

"I am perfectly satisfied," Mr. Twigg added.

"There has been no extravagance?" Mr. Brown insisted.

The Budget-Mr. Reid

"I wont say that," Mr. Twigg answered. "There must be extravagance when you put thousands of men into camps at short notice. The average cost of camps and of feeding the men compares satisfactorily with the cost ip lumber and other camps in this province."

I need not go into this matter any further because from the evidence I have submitted I think it has been shown that this committee did not go very fully into the matter of the running of the camps, in fact they refused to hear witnesses who could give them this information. This demonstrates that the whole inquiry was simply, as Mr. Brown publicly stated, a farce.

I am sorry that all the assertions which I made on March 16 were not gone into. I made serious charges, some in connection with provincial cabinet ministers, and these were never brought out. Only three were dealt with. One was admitted; in the case of the other it was stated I was absolutely wrong regarding the 50,000 blankets, and in connection with the third charge they say that the camps were run in an economical manner. I think it is a mighty poor average when out of fourteen assertions and charges only three were dealt with. This would seem to indicate that, generally speaking, all my statements were accurate or eleven of them would not have been left unchallenged.

I have a copy of a provincial paper in which the premier makes a crack at the Liberal members of this house. He states that investigations had been made necessary by the spreading of propaganda to injure the government. I can assure the house that we do not need to say anything here to injure the government in British Columbia. The premier states that the disgraceful statements made by two British Columbia Liberal members in the House of Commons had been proven to be false. That is not exactly correct because, as I say, I made fourteen assertions and only three were dealt with, one of which was admitted to be correct. If there was anything disgraceful, it was the manner in which this whole matter was carried out, especially as some cabinet ministers were involved.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Is the hon. gentleman referring to cabinet ministers in this government?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

No, I was referring to cabinet ministers of the provincial government.

The hon. member for Nanaimo (Mr. Dickie) would have done his party and his countrymen much more good had he read the full report submitted to the legislature. This report contains many recommendations, but the hon. member saw fit to deal only with the

unemployment charges and did not refer to what is also an important portion of the report. I think the hon. member would have done considerable good for the people of British Columbia by advocating the adoption of the suggestions submitted by this committee. I shall read one or two of the recommendations, which are as follows:

That negotiations be opened with the Dominion government with a view of starting on the Peace river outlet and thus give employment to many men. That investigation should be made to the end that suitable men engaged upon such work would be assisted to a reasonable extent in taking up land in the Peace river district.

That members of the militia unemployed be cared for by their respective units.

That arrangements should be made for representatives of basic British Columbia industries to attend the Imperial conference as observers to assist the Dominion government in recapturing empire. markets.

I am glad it is admitted that empire markets have to be recaptured. The recommendations continue:

Direct relief being wasteful and demoralizing be discontinued in favour of work for remuneration.

I might say, Mr. Speaker, that in British Columbia camps have been established, machinery has been purchased and considerable money spent and, apart from the demoralizing aspect of the dole, it would be too bad if these facilities were not utilized any further. As I said before, the hon. member for Nanaimo would have accomplished much more had he read all the recommendations submitted to the provincial legislature on April 13.

During the short time at my disposal I shall discuss a few matters touching upon the amendments to the budget and the budget speech, as well as general affairs. I listened last evening to an hon. member throwing out accusations that the Liberal party had changed its attitude. It is rather amusing to hear such accusations, because if there ever was a party which changed its attitude, it is the party sitting to the right of the Speaker. Although not then a member of this house, I well remember, when the Dunning budget was brought down, the pooh-pooh that went up all over the country against what was called the gesture in that budget of extending a preference to Great Britain and raising the tariff against foreign countries. The hon. Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Stevens) called it a meaningless gesture, and generally speaking the budget was ridiculed by hon. gentlemen opposite. But they have since changed, Mr. Speaker, and changed very fast. As a matter of fact, if the Liberal party does

The Budget-Mr. Reid

gold standard, and not accepting silver money, I am in a position to draw this comparison. When silver was on a parity with gold every dollar the Chinaman had was equal to the dollar of ours. But to-day however when we sell a case of salmon worth, say, S4.75 or $5, the Chinaman has to give us practically four times that value in his money before we will accept it. Undoubtedly we cannot do business under those conditions. If business is to be on a mutual basis, then there must be a mutual basis either of silver or gold. If business is to be continued the symbol c-r unit of value has to be equal throughout the various countries of the world, or very nearly so.

I have listened with a great deal of attention to the Minister of Trade and Commerce who spoke a few evenings ago concerning interest, and who was very careful to put the figures at ten per cent. He said neither industry nor agriculture could survive or prosper with that interest rate. Why did he not say six per cent? With our declining wages I believe we will never get out of our present difficulties if the rate of interest on government securities, either municipal or provincial, continues at six per cent, coupled with decreasing wages. I have one little criticism of the government. It was bad enough to take ten per cent off the smaller salaries, but I hope the government will not go any further. They have given the lead in regard to wage reductions ahd I hope they will not begin to increase the hours of labour. Only to-day I received a telegram from postal workers who are alarmed because of the notice which has been issued stating that they will be called upon to work overtime and longer hours without further recompense. I hope this government will not be a party to a policy of lower wages and longer hours. As one coming from the industrial field I know the great fight waged in past years to bring about the eight-hour day and increase the standard of living. I trust this government will not be a party to cutting wages and increasing hours of labour, especially at a time such as the present, and after so many years of endeavour on the part of workers to bring about better working conditions.

I should like to have seen the government go a little further in connection with the income tax. We are always being told about activities in the United States, and wre have been told that in that country the income tax is much lower. In the old country the income tax is almost twice the tax in this country, but from reports we learn that it is paid cheerfully. I should like to have seen the govern-

ment go after the larger incomes, because although I will not say greed is an inherent quality in all people yet it is in a great many. That greed has to be held within bounds, and to my mind proper taxation would be one way of bringing about the desired effect, and curbing greed to some extent. The words of the poet Burns: "Man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn" are more true to-day than when they were written, and the fact that the wealth of the world is in the hands of a few should be considered most seriously by the government in power.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. LOUIS BARIBEAU (Champlain) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, it is perhaps

bold on my part to participate in this debate. I am fully aware that I shall not be able to maintain the discussion on the high level where my hon. colleagues have placed it. Therefore, acknowledging my boldness I rely entirely on the proverbial indulgence of the house.

I deem it my duty, however, to congratulate the hon. Minister of Finance (Mr. Rhodes), on his splendid speech on the budget, so greatly welcome in all provinces of the dominion. The expenditure of the administration have been so distributed that each ratepayer contributes according to his means and the luxuries he can afford.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Joseph Arthur Barrette

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARRETTE (Translation):

Hear,

hear!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

May I,

sir, quote the views of the leading business men of my district and province. Mr. W.

G. E. Aird, manager of the Wabasso Cotton Company, states: *

That the general opinion among financiers is that the budget is a moderate and reasonable one.

Mr. Bromley Smith, manager of the Canada Iron Foundries, has this to say:

I think we are still privileged in not having to contribute more, when we compare our position with that of other countries.

Mr. Beaudry Leman, general manager of the Banque Canadienne National, states:

The balancing of the budget is an essential condition of the financial stability of the state and the maintenance on satisfactory basis of the national credit.

Workmen and employers, wage earners and those with independent means: briefly, every body is interested that the finances of the Dominion government should be on a sound

basis.

The only possible way to reach this end is that each person should contribute his reasonable quota.

On the other hand, the state must, under present circumstances, cut out useless expenditures and those which are in the luxury class.

The Budget-Mr. Baribeau

Mr. Taggart Smyth, general manager of the Savings Bank, states:

The measures adopted are governed by the needs of the hour and seem best adapted to the present circumstances. Nobody is astonished and I think that the public will welcome them.

Mr. T. J. Tibbutt, president of the Tibbutt Shoe and Leather Co., has this to say:

It is the best budget we have had for a long time past and it is much less burdensome than the United States budget. Canada, however, is less affected than most of the other countries, by the present economic crisis.

Mr. Frank I. Ritchie, manager of the Wayagamack Pulp & Paper Co., states:

The present budget is fair and equitable.

I deem it also my duty to express my thanks to the people of Champlain who have honoured me with their trust by electing me to represent them in this house.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Denis

Liberal

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

It will be

otherwise at the next election.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

The constituency, sir, which I represent, besides bearing the name of the father of the whole country, which places it among the most venerable, owing to its seniority, is still one of the most important counties in old Quebec. Extending from the shores of the St. Lawrence river across the Laurentian mountains; to the west, bounded by the St. Maurice river which is the source of so much electric energy; and to the east, by the charming St. Ann's river, the county of Champlain maintains a population of 75,000 people, 99 per cent of whom are French Canadians; it comprises three towns of 10,000, 6,000 and 4,000 people respectively, and thirty rural parishes.

This means that I shall relieve the fears of the young men in making known to you the conditions prevailing in such an important section of the country. The house will derive some information which will allow it to judge better of the situation in Quebec, as well as the excellent results of the government's policy; as I intend to sound the optimistic note, notwithstanding what the hon. members opposite may think, for they have all become pessimists since the people of this country have so sadly left them in the lurch.

Let us examine what is the prevailing situation of industries in cities. Indeed, at Cap-de-la-Madeleine, as everywhere else, the economic depression weighs heavily on the good working classes. Two large pulp and paper industries, the Canada Power and Paper Co. and the Wayagamack are the source of the main activities of the workmen.

The former closed its doors a few months ago, while the latter is still working but with a decreased output.

An hon. MEMBER (Translation): What

a fine government!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

Does this mean that work is completely stopped and that nothing was done to relieve unemployment? This is where I wish to congratulate the right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) on the success of his policy as regards unemployment. At a time, sir, when the improvident policy of excessive industrialization inaugurated by the Taschereau government brought about, in the paper industry, the present crisis, the Dominion government, thanks to its wise policy to relieve unemployment, helped the heretofore prosperous working population of that town to ward off poverty-owing to the mills closing down- by undertaking public works and thus giving work to those whom a prolonged state of unemployment might have placed in dire circumstances.

Beside this pulp and paper industry, there is also a natural silk factory lately established in that town. The latter has already given marvellous results, and will further develop as the effects of the protective tariff are felt.

What I have just stated as regards Cap-de-la-Madeleine, may also apply to Grand'Mere, where there is located a branch of the Canada Power and Paper Co. Again there, while the mills were only working part time, the unemployment act gave great relief. There is also located in that town a very prosperous boot and shoe industry. In the town of St. Tite, is to be found a factory making leather goods, which also is doing well. These facts induce me to state that the situation is greatly improving and that the future is very promising. That is why the working classes, believing in the intelligent efforts of the government are not dismayed, and close their ears to the fanciful theories of a diabolical communistic propaganda. For my part, I shall not cease asking the government's protection for the good working classes of Champlain.

The Three Rivers district, one of the largest producing centres of paper and pulp in the world, is undergoing a severe crisis; and I would suggest to our distinguished representatives, at the Imperial conference, to continue their efforts with the British Government so as to obtain for Canadian pulp and paper a special preference. If our pulp and newsprint were given a preference of 10 per cent,

The Budget-Mr. Baribeau

it would greatly benefit this industry, as pulp and paper are amongst our great assets, they are, however, enjoying, at present, but a relative prosperity. A Canadian preference of ten per cent on pulp and paper exports would improve the lot of the numerous workmen engaged in that industry.

May I, sir, read a resolution to that effect adopted by municipal council of the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine: .

Canada, Province of Quebec,

Municipality of the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine.

Resolution No. 4554.

At a regular meeting (special) of the council of the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine, held in the ordinary place and chamber of the sessions of the council, at the City Hall, on Monday this twenty-ninth day of February, 1932, at 7 p.m.

At which meeting were present: His worship the mayor, J. A. Nadeau, Messrs, the councillors: Ernest Arseneau, Ernest Houle, Henri Thiffault, Armand Lera ire and Francois Cour-teau, constituting a quorum under the chairmanship of the mayor.

Moved by councillor Ernest Houle, seconded by councillor Ernest Arseneau,

Resolved, whereas the pulp and paper industry is in a precarious state in our province and throughout the country.

Whereas in July next an Imperial Economic Conference will be held at Ottawa to discuss an economic scheme of mutual preference for the British Empire.

Whereas the National government in England has adopted a protective tariff policy and that this same government is committed to a policy of preference on products of the nations which comprise the British Empire, until and in provision of the mutual and reciprocal results which this economic conference will foster.

Whereas the Canadian government is in favour of a mutual preference policy within the empire.

Whereas England purchases millions of dollars worth of pulp and paper, yearly.

Be it resolved that the council of the town of Cap-de-la-Madeleine takes the liberty of suggesting that the Dominion government continue its endeavours with the Imperial govern-men in order that a more substantial preference be granted to the Canadian pulp and news print.

That the clerk be requested to forward a copy of the present resolution to the hon. Henry Stevens, Minister of Trade and Commerce, to Mr. J. L. Baribeau, M.P., for Champlain and to Mr. Charles Bourgeois, M.P., for Three Rivers-St. Maurice, praying them to give it their attention and support.

Carried unanimously.

Certified copy.

Raoul Rocheleau,

Clerk.

I have just drawn a rapid sketch of the workman's condition in the county which I am privileged to represent. Allow me now to introduce to you the finest rural people in Canada.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Lucien Dubois

Liberal

Mr. DUBOIS (Translation):

Hear, hear!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

This statement may appear contrary to the general belief, but it is a fact, since everywhere, in the new parishes as well as in the older ones, agriculture maintains the place where the Creator wished it to be and constitutes a great nucleus of high moral ideals and physical welfare. Come to our country side along the shores of the St. Lawrence river, visit the inland parishes, penetrate even into the back sections, victorious of the forest, and the same vista will meet your eyes searching for the charms of landscapes, and the same happy life will fill your patriotic heart with joy.

What is meant here is that our compatriots are at work; as always, they are part of the land, they love it and toil over it. They do not farm for the time being, satisfied with what each year brings, like those lacking foresight, neither with the simplicity of certain farmers who, believing that the resources of a wheat farm are inexhaustible, live at a rate that only a gold mine could permit, but they farm wisely and scientifically like heads of industries, in view of a permanent success. Let economic crises then come, let meagre returns be obtained, they are inured to the hardships and can await normal times without crying famine nor face ruin and death.

This does not signify that everything runs smoothly. Unfortunately, in Champlain, as in other counties, farmers have deserted the farm for the city, in a race for prize money, which manufacturers offer in the shape of high wages. Furthermore, yet sad to state, quite a number of our farmers having purchased properties at too high a price, are today unable to meet their liabilities. The returns of their farm products are too small...

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Lucien Dubois

Liberal

Mr. DUBOIS (Translation):

Hear, hear!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Jean Louis Baribeau

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARIBEAU (Translation):

... but they know that such prices prevail everywhere; municipal taxes are high, as well as school taxes.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Joseph Georges Bouchard

Liberal

Mr. BOUCHARD (Translation):

Not everywhere.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OP DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OP THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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April 19, 1932